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Page 263

AMICA AMERICA

sung theMarseillaise on New Year's Day 1940? ... A little later renewed cheering came over the radio; a jazz band joined in; it was midnight in St. Louis, Missouri ... What were they thinking about France in St. Louis, Missouri? ... I was soon to know, for I had promised to go there to give a lecture. It seemed that the relations between the two countries were a little better. An Ambassador, Admiral Leahy, had just been sent to France by the President, and Li fe had asked me to write an article to explain this decision ... We talked about our children, our friends and my mother for whom life must be so hard ... Finally a new burst of laughter and songs announced that the twelve strokes of midnight were ringing out in San Francisco. All America had now entered upon the year 1941.

My lecture tour took me to the four corners of the United States. I travelled a great deal by air. In my childhood I had enthusiastically read and reread a book by Robida, The Electric Life, in which aerial liners were described. At that time this seemed to be the maddest and most extreme of dreams. Now the classic waiting-rooms at the airports with their baggage scales, loudspeakers, floodlights in front and recreation rooms for the pilots seemed to me as familiar and matter-of-fact as the station at Elbeuf had been. I flew mostly at night above a black abyss which was brightened from time to time by enchanted cities and the blue and red jewels of signal lights.
I spoke at Charlotte, at Palm Beach, at Atlanta where I had luncheon beside a modest young woman with eyeglasses, who said to me toward the end of the meal:
`You know, I write too . . .'
`And what have you written?' I asked with polite condescension.
`I have written a novel.'
`Oh, indeed ... And what is the title?'
`Gone with theWind', she said softly.
I spoke in Texas at Houston, Austin and Fort Worth; then in Louisiana at New Orleans. I spoke in Los Angeles and in San Francisco, in Omaha (Nebraska) and in Denver (Colorado), in Cincinnati and in Baltimore. Sometimes after a lecture the French people of the city would ask me to say a few words to them. I preached unity:
`You tell me that you are divided by your opinions and nevertheless

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE sung theMarseillaise on New Year's Day 1940? ... A little later renewed cheering came over what is radio; a jazz band joined in; it was midnight in St. Louis, Missouri ... What were they thinking about France in St. Louis, Missouri? ... I was soon to know, for I had promised to go there to give a lecture. It seemed that what is relations between what is two countries were a little better. An Ambassador, Admiral Leahy, had just been sent to France by what is President, and Li fe had asked me to write an article to explain this decision ... We talked about our children, our friends and my mother for whom life must be so hard ... Finally a new burst of laughter and songs announced that what is twelve strokes of midnight were ringing out in San Francisco. All America had now entered upon what is year 1941. My lecture tour took me to what is four corners of what is United States. I travelled a great deal by air. In my childhood I had enthusiastically read and reread a book by Robida, what is Electric Life, in which aerial liners were described. At that time this seemed to be what is maddest and most extreme of dreams. Now what is classic waiting-rooms at what is airports with their baggage scales, loudspeakers, floodlights in front and recreation rooms for what is pilots seemed to me as familiar and matter-of-fact as what is station at Elbeuf had been. I flew mostly at night above a black abyss which was brightened from time to time by enchanted cities and what is blue and red jewels of signal lights. I spoke at Charlotte, at Palm Beach, at Atlanta where I had luncheon beside a modest young woman with eyeglasses, who said to me toward what is end of what is meal: `You know, I write too . . .' `And what have you written?' I asked with polite condescension. `I have written a novel.' `Oh, indeed ... And what is what is title?' `Gone with theWind', she said softly. I spoke in Texas at Houston, Austin and Fort Worth; then in Louisiana at New Orleans. I spoke in Los Angeles and in San Francisco, in Omaha (Nebraska) and in Denver (Colorado), in Cincinnati and in Baltimore. Sometimes after a lecture what is French people of what is city would ask me to say a few words to them. I preached unity: `You tell me that you are divided by your opinions and nevertheless where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 263 where is p align="center" where is strong AMICA AMERICA where is p align="justify" sung theMarseillaise on New Year's Day 1940? ... A little later renewed cheering came over what is radio; a jazz band joined in; it was midnight in St. Louis, Missouri ... What were they thinking about France in St. Louis, Missouri? ... I was soon to know, for I had promised to go there to give a lecture. It seemed that what is relations between what is two countries were a little better. An Ambassador, Admiral Leahy, had just been sent to France by the President, and Li fe had asked me to write an article to explain this decision ... We talked about our children, our friends and my mother for whom life must be so hard ... Finally a new burst of laughter and songs announced that what is twelve strokes of midnight were ringing out in San Francisco. All America had now entered upon what is year 1941. My lecture tour took me to what is four corners of what is United States. I travelled a great deal by air. In my childhood I had enthusiastically read and reread a book by Robida, what is Electric Life, in which aerial liners were described. At that time this seemed to be what is maddest and most extreme of dreams. Now what is classic waiting-rooms at the airports with their baggage scales, loudspeakers, floodlights in front and recreation rooms for what is pilots seemed to me as familiar and matter-of-fact as what is station at Elbeuf had been. I flew mostly at night above a black abyss which was brightened from time to time by enchanted cities and what is blue and red jewels of signal lights. I spoke at Charlotte, at Palm Beach, at Atlanta where I had luncheon beside a modest young woman with eyeglasses, who said to me toward what is end of what is meal: `You know, I write too . . .' `And what have you written?' I asked with polite condescension. `I have written a novel.' `Oh, indeed ... And what is what is title?' `Gone with theWind', she said softly. I spoke in Texas at Houston, Austin and Fort Worth; then in Louisiana at New Orleans. I spoke in Los Angeles and in San Francisco, in Omaha (Nebraska) and in Denver (Colorado), in Cincinnati and in Baltimore. Sometimes after a lecture what is French people of what is city would ask me to say a few words to them. I preached unity: `You tell me that you are divided by your opinions and nevertheless where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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