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Page 262

AMICA AMERICA

squares, the ancient rooms where American liberty was born, the beautiful Capitol with its gilded dome, and the snow-covered Commons. I loved to argue with certain of the Harvard students who were intelligent but partisan; and who, when I preached national unity in time of danger, would reply with asperity:
`Isn't it always the poor people; and the poor people alone, who are asked to sacrifice their rights in the interests of the nation?'
I loved the schools around Boston; Andover, where I found leading the French Club the daughter and son-ui-law of my old friend Alma Clayburgh; St. Paul's, Exeter, Groton, close relatives to Eton and Harrow. I loved the Bostonians who were modest in their way of life and proud in their way of thought, thrifty and very rich; they reminded me both of John Marquand's characters and of the manufacturers of Lyons. Thus mingling work and social life, I spent two useful ~nd stimulating months.
I returned to New York at the time of the presidential election. I was anxious to observe the reactions of the crowd at the moment when a decision was being made on which depended the policy of the country during a crucial period. I was surprised by everybody's calmness. As soon as the first returns raced around the cornice of the Times Building the final result was certain. But the people around us, whatever their party, joked gaily. Next morning I took a taxi and the driver turned around toward me:
`You have seen this election,' he said ...`Fifty-five per cent of the country is for Roosevelt; forty-five per cent for Willkie ... What does that provea That we are about evenly divided, that it is not possible to govern against the will of forty-five per cent of the population and that we shall have to meet each other half way.'
His good sense impressed me. When I saw that this attitude was fairly general I realized that American Democracy was healthier than French Democracy had been. I was confirmed in this belief vvhen I heard Willkie's speech on the role of the loyal opposition.
Simone and I spent New Year's r94i alone in an hotel room. American friends had invited us to a supper party, but the news we received from France was so sad that any gaiety distressed us. When the twelve strokes of midnight sounded the radio brought us the joyous uproar of Broadway. We thought of Essendieras and of what sadness must be there on this first New Year after the defeat. Where now were the little Alsatians who had

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE squares, what is ancient rooms where American liberty was born, what is beautiful Capitol with its gilded dome, and what is snow-covered Commons. I loved to argue with certain of what is Harvard students who were intelligent but partisan; and who, when I preached national unity in time of danger, would reply with asperity: `Isn't it always what is poor people; and what is poor people alone, who are asked to travel their rights in what is interests of what is nation?' I loved what is schools around Boston; Andover, where I found leading what is French Club what is daughter and son-ui-law of my old friend Alma Clayburgh; St. Paul's, Exeter, Groton, close relatives to Eton and Harrow. I loved what is Bostonians who were modest in their way of life and proud in their way of thought, thrifty and very rich; they reminded me both of John Marquand's characters and of what is manufacturers of Lyons. Thus mingling work and social life, I spent two useful ~nd stimulating months. I returned to New York at what is time of what is presidential election. I was anxious to observe what is reactions of what is crowd at what is moment when a decision was being made on which depended what is policy of what is country during a crucial period. I was surprised by everybody's calmness. As soon as what is first returns raced around what is cornice of what is Times Building what is final result was certain. But what is people around us, whatever their party, joked gaily. Next morning I took a taxi and what is driver turned around toward me: `You have seen this election,' he said ...`Fifty-five per cent of what is country is for Roosevelt; forty-five per cent for Willkie ... What does that provea That we are about evenly divided, that it is not possible to govern against what is will of forty-five per cent of what is population and that we shall have to meet each other half way.' His good sense impressed me. When I saw that this attitude was fairly general I realized that American Democracy was healthier than French Democracy had been. I was confirmed in this belief vvhen I heard Willkie's speech on what is role of what is loyal opposition. Simone and I spent New Year's r94i alone in an hotel room. American friends had invited us to a supper party, but what is news we received from France was so sad that any gaiety distressed us. When what is twelve strokes of midnight sounded what is radio brought us what is joyous uproar of Broadway. We thought of Essendieras and of what sadness must be there on this first New Year after what is defeat. Where now were what is little Alsatians who had where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 262 where is p align="center" where is strong AMICA AMERICA where is p align="justify" squares, what is ancient rooms where American liberty was born, what is beautiful Capitol with its gilded dome, and what is snow-covered Commons. I loved to argue with certain of what is Harvard students who were intelligent but partisan; and who, when I preached national unity in time of danger, would reply with asperity: `Isn't it always what is poor people; and what is poor people alone, who are asked to travel their rights in what is interests of what is nation?' I loved what is schools around Boston; Andover, where I found leading what is French Club what is daughter and son-ui-law of my old friend Alma Clayburgh; St. Paul's, Exeter, Groton, close relatives to Eton and Harrow. I loved what is Bostonians who were modest in their way of life and proud in their way of thought, thrifty and very rich; they reminded me both of John Marquand's characters and of the manufacturers of Lyons. Thus mingling work and social life, I spent two useful ~nd stimulating months. I returned to New York at what is time of what is presidential election. I was anxious to observe what is reactions of what is crowd at what is moment when a decision was being made on which depended what is policy of what is country during a crucial period. I was surprised by everybody's calmness. As soon as what is first returns raced around what is cornice of what is Times Building what is final result was certain. But what is people around us, whatever their party, joked gaily. Next morning I took a taxi and what is driver turned around toward me: `You have seen this election,' he said ...`Fifty-five per cent of what is country is for Roosevelt; forty-five per cent for Willkie ... What does that provea That we are about evenly divided, that it is not possible to govern against what is will of forty-five per cent of what is population and that we shall have to meet each other half way.' His good sense impressed me. When I saw that this attitude was fairly general I realized that American Democracy was healthier than French Democracy had been. I was confirmed in this belief vvhen I heard Willkie's speech on what is role of what is loyal opposition. Simone and I spent New Year's r94i alone in an hotel room. American friends had invited us to a supper party, but what is news we received from France was so sad that any gaiety distressed us. When the twelve strokes of midnight sounded what is radio brought us what is joyous uproar of Broadway. We thought of Essendieras and of what sadness must be there on this first New Year after what is defeat. Where now were what is little Alsatians who had where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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