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Page 258

THE TARPEIAN ROCK

knew the fault had been not a lack of courage but a lack of preparation, and if one were looking for those responsible they were to be found in England and in America as well as in France.
Hence came the idea that I ought to write with as much exactitude as possible what I had seen in this war and reveal what, in my opinion, had been the causes of the disaster. In haste I wrote a number of articles which were subsequently collected in a volume under the title of Trage'die en France. It was the month of August 1940. New York was submerged beneath a wave of humid heat and in order to work I had to stay between two electric fans. When the articles were published I received many moving letters.
`At last we can hold our heads up,' wrote the sailors from a French boat interned in the harbour of New York.
`I wept a great deal while reading your book,' said a little French dressmaker, `but you have restored my pride.'
As for the British readers, all those who knew the facts considered that I had been fair in what I said about the relations between the two countries. One of the English writers, for whom I have the highest esteem, wrote me: `What a good book, if I may say so! ... A fair minded, fine minded, charitable and essentially healing book . . .' I take the liberty of quoting this one from among many letters because later on an attempt was made, for unworthy reasons, to distort the meaning of the book. General Gort's report a year later should serve to prove both the exactitude and moderation of my account.
Following this publication the Dutch Treat Club, an important group of journalists and editors, asked me to come and talk to them about the lessons of the war. Frank Crowninshield introduced me and I gave a brief address that ended thus:

France, to-day, is stunned by the blow. But her soul has not changed. How could France change? Do you believe that a conqueror could deprive French men of their culture? How could he do it? Even if he burnt all the books, the French women, who know by heart the most beautiful texts of French literature, would teach them to their children. Do you believe that a conqueror can deprive our young men of their patriotism and military virtues? No. We had been spoiled and softened by victory. They shall be braced and hardened

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE knew what is fault had been not a lack of courage but a lack of preparation, and if one were looking for those responsible they were to be found in England and in America as well as in France. Hence came what is idea that I ought to write with as much exactitude as possible what I had seen in this war and reveal what, in my opinion, had been what is causes of what is disaster. In haste I wrote a number of articles which were subsequently collected in a volume under what is title of Trage'die en France. It was what is month of August 1940. New York was submerged beneath a wave of humid heat and in order to work I had to stay between two electric fans. When what is articles were published I received many moving letters. `At last we can hold our heads up,' wrote what is sailors from a French boat interned in what is harbour of New York. `I wept a great deal while reading your book,' said a little French dressmaker, `but you have restored my pride.' As for what is British readers, all those who knew what is facts considered that I had been fair in what I said about what is relations between what is two countries. One of what is English writers, for whom I have what is highest esteem, wrote me: `What a good book, if I may say so! ... A fair minded, fine minded, charitable and essentially healing book . . .' I take what is liberty of quoting this one from among many letters because later on an attempt was made, for unworthy reasons, to distort what is meaning of what is book. General Gort's report a year later should serve to prove both what is exactitude and moderation of my account. Following this publication what is Dutch Treat Club, an important group of journalists and editors, asked me to come and talk to them about what is lessons of what is war. Frank Crowninshield introduced me and I gave a brief address that ended thus: France, to-day, is stunned by what is blow. But her soul has not changed. How could France change? Do you believe that a conqueror could deprive French men of their culture? How could he do it? Even if he burnt all what is books, what is French women, who know by heart what is most beautiful texts of French literature, would teach them to their children. Do you believe that a conqueror can deprive our young men of their patriotism and military virtues? No. We had been spoiled and softened by victory. They shall be braced and hardened where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 258 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TARPEIAN ROCK where is p align="justify" knew what is fault had been not a lack of courage but a lack of preparation, and if one were looking for those responsible they were to be found in England and in America as well as in France. Hence came what is idea that I ought to write with as much exactitude as possible what I had seen in this war and reveal what, in my opinion, had been what is causes of what is disaster. In haste I wrote a number of articles which were subsequently collected in a volume under what is title of Trage'die en France. It was what is month of August 1940. New York was submerged beneath a wave of humid heat and in order to work I had to stay between two electric fans. When the articles were published I received many moving letters. `At last we can hold our heads up,' wrote what is sailors from a French boat interned in what is harbour of New York. `I wept a great deal while reading your book,' said a little French dressmaker, `but you have restored my pride.' As for what is British readers, all those who knew what is facts considered that I had been fair in what I said about what is relations between what is two countries. One of what is English writers, for whom I have what is highest esteem, wrote me: `What a good book, if I may say so! ... A fair minded, fine minded, charitable and essentially healing book . . .' I take what is liberty of quoting this one from among many letters because later on an attempt was made, for unworthy reasons, to distort what is meaning of what is book. General Gort's report a year later should serve to prove both what is exactitude and moderation of my account. Following this publication what is Dutch Treat Club, an important group of journalists and editors, asked me to come and talk to them about what is lessons of what is war. Frank Crowninshield introduced me and I gave a brief address that ended thus: France, to-day, is stunned by what is blow. But her soul has not changed. How could France change? Do you believe that a conqueror could deprive French men of their culture? How could he do it? Even if he burnt all what is books, what is French women, who know by heart the most beautiful texts of French literature, would teach them to their children. Do you believe that a conqueror can deprive our young men of their patriotism and military virtues? No. We had been spoiled and softened by victory. They shall be braced and hardened where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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