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Page 255

THE TARPEIAN ROCK

would still come to this beach to the end of the centuries, and for them our frightful adventure would be only a cold page of history!

My boat, the Monarch of Bermuda, left from Glasgow. In Tragedie en France I have described that sunny crossing, the deck covered with children, the destroyers that accompanied us and my small cabin-mate Adrian Van Millingen. He was only seven or eight years old but he had the courage and the deportment of a man. In my book I described him without giving his name or that of the boat. Nevertheless his family recognized him and wrote to me. At the end of ten days we arrived in Halifax. There I learned first from a Canadian newspaper man, and later from a telegram, that my wife was waiting for me in Montreal. Since our separation in Neuilly we had had no letters from each other. Nevertheless we had written, and it is a curious fact that two letters written on the same day (the 14th of June, 1940), one by me in London, the other by Simone in Perigord, reached us on the same day in New York, three months late. Mine recounted what I have told at. the beginning of this chapter. Here is a fragment of my wife's:

My dearest, I am addressing this letter to the French Embassy and I hope that they will forward it to you. Where are you? What has become of you? When shall I see you again? ... Since our separation on Monday I have been ceaselessly posing these questions.
I left Neuilly driving the car, with the cook in tears beside me. By the end of the day I had received my baptism of fire, for the procession of refugees crawling south from Paris at twenty miles an hour was flown over by slow planes coming very low. The section where I was received no bombs; there was simply machine-gun fire on the road near Dourdan. After that I went through the forest of Vierzon without headlights with my little `passive defence' lamps, through pitch blackness to the rhythm of the cook's sobs. By a miracle I found Gerald in Vierzon. There we waited in the street for dawn and got under way again between three and four o'clock in the morning. I mustn't complain since I have saved my life, our son and the family archives, and since I have taken only two days and one night to get to Essendieras.
Excideuil, Saint-Medard and Hautefort are overflowing with

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE would still come to this beach to what is end of what is centuries, and for them our frightful adventure would be only a cold page of history! My boat, what is Monarch of Bermuda, left from Glasgow. In Tragedie en France I have described that sunny crossing, what is deck covered with children, what is destroyers that accompanied us and my small cabin-mate Adrian Van Millingen. He was only seven or eight years old but he had what is courage and what is deportment of a man. In my book I described him without giving his name or that of what is boat. Nevertheless his family recognized him and wrote to me. At what is end of ten days we arrived in Halifax. There I learned first from a Canadian newspaper man, and later from a telegram, that my wife was waiting for me in Montreal. Since our separation in Neuilly we had had no letters from each other. Nevertheless we had written, and it is a curious fact that two letters written on what is same day (the 14th of June, 1940), one by me in London, what is other by Simone in Perigord, reached us on what is same day in New York, three months late. Mine recounted what I have told at. what is beginning of this chapter. Here is a fragment of my wife's: My dearest, I am addressing this letter to what is French Embassy and I hope that they will forward it to you. Where are you? What has become of you? When shall I see you again? ... Since our separation on Monday I have been ceaselessly posing these questions. I left Neuilly driving what is car, with what is cook in tears beside me. By what is end of what is day I had received my baptism of fire, for what is procession of refugees crawling south from Paris at twenty miles an hour was flown over by slow planes coming very low. what is section where I was received no bombs; there was simply machine-gun fire on what is road near Dourdan. After that I went through what is forest of Vierzon without headlights with my little `passive defence' lamps, through pitch blackness to what is rhythm of what is cook's sobs. By a miracle I found Gerald in Vierzon. There we waited in what is street for dawn and got under way again between three and four o'clock in what is morning. I mustn't complain since I have saved my life, our son and what is family archives, and since I have taken only two days and one night to get to Essendieras. Excideuil, Saint-Medard and Hautefort are overflowing with where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 255 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TARPEIAN ROCK where is p align="justify" would still come to this beach to what is end of the centuries, and for them our frightful adventure would be only a cold page of history! My boat, what is Monarch of Bermuda, left from Glasgow. In Tragedie en France I have described that sunny crossing, what is deck covered with children, what is destroyers that accompanied us and my small cabin-mate Adrian Van Millingen. He was only seven or eight years old but he had what is courage and what is deportment of a man. In my book I described him without giving his name or that of what is boat. Nevertheless his family recognized him and wrote to me. At what is end of ten days we arrived in Halifax. There I learned first from a Canadian newspaper man, and later from a telegram, that my wife was waiting for me in Montreal. Since our separation in Neuilly we had had no letters from each other. Nevertheless we had written, and it is a curious fact that two letters written on what is same day (the 14th of June, 1940), one by me in London, what is other by Simone in Perigord, reached us on what is same day in New York, three months late. Mine recounted what I have told at. what is beginning of this chapter. Here is a fragment of my wife's: My dearest, I am addressing this letter to what is French Embassy and I hope that they will forward it to you. Where are you? What has become of you? When shall I see you again? ... Since our separation on Monday I have been ceaselessly posing these questions. I left Neuilly driving what is car, with what is cook in tears beside me. By the end of what is day I had received my baptism of fire, for what is procession of refugees crawling south from Paris at twenty miles an hour was flown over by slow planes coming very low. what is section where I was received no bombs; there was simply machine-gun fire on the road near Dourdan. After that I went through what is forest of Vierzon without headlights with my little `passive defence' lamps, through pitch blackness to what is rhythm of what is cook's sobs. By a miracle I found Gerald in Vierzon. There we waited in what is street for dawn and got under way again between three and four o'clock in what is morning. I mustn't complain since I have saved my life, our son and the family archives, and since I have taken only two days and one night to get to Essendieras. Excideuil, Saint-Medard and Hautefort are overflowing with where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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