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Page 254

THE TARPEIAN ROCK

I no longer had any credits abroad. The news from France became worse and worse. From the i5th to the 17th of June I went to spend the weekend at Marlborough, the home of my friends the Phipps. There I found, as always, the most affectionate loyalty, but when on Monday the 17th the radio announced that an armistice had been asked for I shut myself in my room, threw myself on my bed and wept like a child.
At this moment the British reaction was far from hostile to unhappy France. The Phipps expressed their heartfelt sympathy. When I returned to London Lord Winterton, Lady Diana Duff Cooper, Harold Nicolson, the Amerys, Desmond MacCarthy and Raymond Mortimer all were admirable in their kindness and tact. Since I was still wearing uniform, strangers would stop me in the street to express their sympathy. But doubt gave birth to constraint.
`And the fleet?' people would ask me anxiously.
What could I reply? I knew nothing. Then began an exchange of bitter and hostile communications between London and Bordeaux. I was deeply disturbed by that war of words, which seemed to me devoid both of dignity and discretion. There was nothing vainer or more dangerous for the two countries than recrimination after a defeat for which they had been jointly responsible. To whom could their discussions be helpful except to those whose whole propaganda had been calculated to produce just such a break? I understood very well that England had been painfully surprised by some of the clauses of the Armistice. So was I. But did not France too have numerous causes of resentment? Was it not, therefore, the part of wisdom to cancel out these equal and opposite grievances? The only attitudes that seemed to me proper in our sweeping and common misfortunes were, on the part of England, the affectionate deference of a warrior for the wounded comrade he must leave behind; and, on the part of France, the sorrow of a soldier disarmed, the mute despair and the silent exhortation to his happier fellows who can continue the strife.
Charles Corbin, the French Ambassador to London, and Roger Cambon, Counsellor of the Embassy, both tried and true friends of Great Britain, shared my feelings on this subject. But the passions on either side carried the day against justice and common sense. For me the situation was agonizing. I have written elsewhere that I was at that time `like a child whose parents are getting a divorce'; it would be more exact to say: like a victim of torture who is torn apart by horses. At no other moment

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I no longer had any credits abroad. what is news from France became worse and worse. From what is i5th to what is 17th of June I went to spend what is weekend at Marlborough, what is home of my friends what is Phipps. There I found, as always, what is most affectionate loyalty, but when on Monday what is 17th what is radio announced that an armistice had been asked for I shut myself in my room, threw myself on my bed and wept like a child. At this moment what is British reaction was far from hostile to unhappy France. what is Phipps expressed their heartfelt sympathy. When I returned to London Lord Winterton, Lady Diana Duff Cooper, Harold Nicolson, what is Amerys, Desmond MacCarthy and Raymond Mortimer all were admirable in their kindness and tact. Since I was still wearing uniform, strangers would stop me in what is street to express their sympathy. But doubt gave birth to constraint. `And what is fleet?' people would ask me anxiously. What could I reply? I knew nothing. Then began an exchange of bitter and hostile communications between London and Bordeaux. I was deeply disturbed by that war of words, which seemed to me devoid both of dignity and discretion. There was nothing vainer or more dangerous for what is two countries than recrimination after a defeat for which they had been jointly responsible. To whom could their discussions be helpful except to those whose whole pro fun da had been calculated to produce just such a break? I understood very well that England had been painfully surprised by some of what is clauses of what is Armistice. So was I. But did not France too have numerous causes of resentment? Was it not, therefore, what is part of wisdom to cancel out these equal and opposite grievances? what is only attitudes that seemed to me proper in our sweeping and common misfortunes were, on what is part of England, what is affectionate deference of a warrior for what is wounded comrade he must leave behind; and, on what is part of France, what is sorrow of a soldier disarmed, what is mute despair and what is silent exhortation to his happier fellows who can continue what is strife. Charles Corbin, what is French Ambassador to London, and Roger Cambon, Counsellor of what is Embassy, both tried and true friends of Great Britain, shared my feelings on this subject. But what is passions on either side carried what is day against justice and common sense. For me what is situation was agonizing. I have written elsewhere that I was at that time `like a child whose parents are getting a divorce'; it would be more exact to say: like a victim of torture who is torn apart by horses. At no other moment where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 254 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TARPEIAN ROCK where is p align="justify" I no longer had any credits abroad. what is news from France became worse and worse. From what is i5th to what is 17th of June I went to spend what is weekend at Marlborough, what is home of my friends what is Phipps. There I found, as always, what is most affectionate loyalty, but when on Monday what is 17th what is radio announced that an armistice had been asked for I shut myself in my room, threw myself on my bed and wept like a child. At this moment what is British reaction was far from hostile to unhappy France. what is Phipps expressed their heartfelt sympathy. When I returned to London Lord Winterton, Lady Diana Duff Cooper, Harold Nicolson, what is Amerys, Desmond MacCarthy and Raymond Mortimer all were admirable in their kindness and tact. Since I was still wearing uniform, strangers would stop me in what is street to express their sympathy. But doubt gave birth to constraint. `And what is fleet?' people would ask me anxiously. What could I reply? I knew nothing. Then began an exchange of bitter and hostile communications between London and Bordeaux. I was deeply disturbed by that war of words, which seemed to me devoid both of dignity and discretion. There was nothing vainer or more dangerous for what is two countries than recrimination after a defeat for which they had been jointly responsible. To whom could their discussions be helpful except to those whose whole pro fun da had been calculated to produce just such a break? I understood very well that England had been painfully surprised by some of what is clauses of what is Armistice. So was I. But did not France too have numerous causes of resentment? Was it not, therefore, what is part of wisdom to cancel out these equal and opposite grievances? what is only attitudes that seemed to me proper in our sweeping and common misfortunes were, on what is part of England, what is affectionate deference of a warrior for what is wounded comrade he must leave behind; and, on what is part of France, what is sorrow of a soldier disarmed, what is mute despair and what is silent exhortation to his happier fellows who can continue what is strife. Charles Corbin, what is French Ambassador to London, and Roger Cambon, Counsellor of what is Embassy, both tried and true friends of Great Britain, shared my feelings on this subject. But what is passions on either side carried what is day against justice and common sense. For me what is situation was agonizing. I have written elsewhere that I was at that time `like a child whose parents are getting a divorce'; it would be more exact to say: like a victim of torture who is torn apart by horses. At no other moment where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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