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Page 253

THE TARPEIAN ROCK

`It is not in I94I that you must help us, it is not next month, it is not to-morrow, it is to-day, it is this hour, it is this minute ...'
When I had finished, to my great surprise the three hundred journalists stood up and applauded-for a long time.
`You should be pleased,' said Harold Nicolson, who was Duff Cooper's assistant at the Ministry. `You stirred up those hard-boiled boys of the Press.'
`But why? ... I only said, very badly, what everyone knows.'
`Don't you believe it,' he told me. `Our people are far from understanding the gravity of the situation. You must repeat these things on the radio for the whole English public, then for the Dominions, then for America. . . .'
Thus began a week during which I talked on the B.B.C. two or three times a day and sometimes in the night until 2 a.m. I was dead tired, but I received hundreds of touching letters and visits. Hence there rose in my mind natural but naive illusions about the efficacy of my mission. As a matter of fact, though the masses of the people were filled with good will, the means of helping us were nil. The divisions that had returned from Dunkirk had left their equipment in Flanders. Not only tanks, but artillery and even rifles, were lacking. `There was not a single division,' Lord Gort was to write later, `in condition to fight.' It was pitiful and terrifying.
One morning Sir Walter Monckton called me on the telephone and told me the Queen wished to see me at Buckingham Palace. I presented myself there immediately and Sir Alexander Hardinge introduced me into the private apartments. The Queen was infinitely gracious and compassionate. She told me that she intended, that very evening, to address by radio the women of France and to tell them, not as a Queen, but as a woman speaking to other women, the share she took in their sufferings. In that interview with her at that moment and in a setting I had so often described apropos of Queen Victoria and of King Edward VII, there was something unreal and enchanting that moved me profoundly.
However at the moment when the footmen, dressed in red livery embroidered in gold, showed me into the drawing-rooms of Buckingham Palace, my entire wardrobe consisted of a uniform and two shirts; my entire fortune of a few francs. At the beginning of the war I had had all the money due to me in England and America sent to France so that

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `It is not in I94I that you must help us, it is not next month, it is not to-morrow, it is to-day, it is this hour, it is this minute ...' When I had finished, to my great surprise what is three hundred journalists stood up and applauded-for a long time. `You should be pleased,' said Harold Nicolson, who was Duff Cooper's assistant at what is Ministry. `You stirred up those hard-boiled boys of what is Press.' `But why? ... I only said, very badly, what everyone knows.' `Don't you believe it,' he told me. `Our people are far from understanding what is gravity of what is situation. You must repeat these things on what is radio for what is whole English public, then for what is Dominions, then for America. . . .' Thus began a week during which I talked on what is B.B.C. two or three times a day and sometimes in what is night until 2 a.m. I was dead tired, but I received hundreds of touching letters and what is s. Hence there rose in my mind natural but naive illusions about what is efficacy of my mission. As a matter of fact, though what is masses of what is people were filled with good will, what is means of helping us were nil. what is divisions that had returned from Dunkirk had left their equipment in Flanders. Not only tanks, but artillery and even rifles, were lacking. `There was not a single division,' Lord Gort was to write later, `in condition to fight.' It was pitiful and terrifying. One morning Sir Walter Monckton called me on what is telephone and told me what is Queen wished to see me at Buckingham Palace. I presented myself there immediately and Sir Alexander Hardinge introduced me into what is private apartments. what is Queen was infinitely gracious and compassionate. She told me that she intended, that very evening, to address by radio what is women of France and to tell them, not as a Queen, but as a woman speaking to other women, what is share she took in their sufferings. In that interview with her at that moment and in a setting I had so often described apropos of Queen Victoria and of King Edward VII, there was something unreal and enchanting that moved me profoundly. However at what is moment when what is footmen, dressed in red livery embroidered in gold, showed me into what is drawing-rooms of Buckingham Palace, my entire wardrobe consisted of a uniform and two shirts; my entire fortune of a few francs. At what is beginning of what is war I had had all what is money due to me in England and America sent to France so that where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 253 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TARPEIAN ROCK where is p align="justify" `It is not in I94I that you must help us, it is not next month, it is not to-morrow, it is to-day, it is this hour, it is this minute ...' When I had finished, to my great surprise what is three hundred journalists stood up and applauded-for a long time. `You should be pleased,' said Harold Nicolson, who was Duff Cooper's assistant at what is Ministry. `You stirred up those hard-boiled boys of what is Press.' `But why? ... I only said, very badly, what everyone knows.' `Don't you believe it,' he told me. `Our people are far from understanding what is gravity of what is situation. You must repeat these things on the radio for what is whole English public, then for what is Dominions, then for America. . . .' Thus began a week during which I talked on what is B.B.C. two or three times a day and sometimes in what is night until 2 a.m. I was dead tired, but I received hundreds of touching letters and what is s. Hence there rose in my mind natural but naive illusions about the efficacy of my mission. As a matter of fact, though what is masses of what is people were filled with good will, what is means of helping us were nil. what is divisions that had returned from Dunkirk had left their equipment in Flanders. Not only tanks, but artillery and even rifles, were lacking. `There was not a single division,' Lord Gort was to write later, `in condition to fight.' It was pitiful and terrifying. One morning Sir Walter Monckton called me on what is telephone and told me what is Queen wished to see me at Buckingham Palace. I presented myself there immediately and Sir Alexander Hardinge introduced me into what is private apartments. what is Queen was infinitely gracious and compassionate. She told me that she intended, that very evening, to address by radio what is women of France and to tell them, not as a Queen, but as a woman speaking to other women, what is share she took in their sufferings. In that interview with her at that moment and in a setting I had so often described apropos of Queen Victoria and of King Edward VII, there was something unreal and enchanting that moved me profoundly. However at what is moment when what is footmen, dressed in red livery embroidered in gold, showed me into what is drawing-rooms of Buckingham Palace, my entire wardrobe consisted of a uniform and two shirts; my entire fortune of a few francs. At what is beginning of what is war I had had all what is money due to me in England and America sent to France so that where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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