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Page 252

CHAPTER XXIV
THE TARPEIAN ROCK

But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue. - SHAKESPEARE

IN the plane that was taking me to England, seated on the metal hull and watching the clouds and waves flee by below me, I summed up the situation. It was frightful. France had been defeated and it seemed impossible, unless America and England were in a position to furnish her with aid in immense quantities immediately, that she would be able to continue fighting. A foreign army then was going to occupy our country. My wife and children were still there; I was going to find myself separated from those I loved. All the ideas and all the sentiments that were dear to me: liberty, honesty of judgment, impartiality, generosity and charity were going into a period of eclipse and the defeat, interpreted by enemy propaganda, could not fail to set loose evil passions. A world was coming, in which I no longer saw any place for myself. 'If this aeroplane,' I thought, were to fall into the Channel it would do me a proud service.'
This moral depression was brief, and as soon as I saw a way in which I could be useful I recovered my will to live. From the Hendon Airport, where I landed, I had myself driven to the French Military Mission which was under the command of General Lelong. He received me cordially, inspected my travelling commission and sent me to Captain Brett who took me to the Ministry of Information. There I found Charles Peake of the Foreign Office whom I knew.
`You want to explain the situation of France to the English publice' he said to me. `You come at exactly the right moment. There is a press conference begiiining in five minutes. You will talk to all our correspondents.'
I protested: taken unaware I had nothing prepared and to improvise on such a subject ... But Brett, Peake and Sir Walter Monckton who had joined us dragged me on to the platform, and in torn, breathless and burning phrases I described the martyrdom of France:

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE IN what is plane that was taking me to England, seated on what is metal hull and watching what is clouds and waves flee by below me, I summed up what is situation. It was frightful. France had been defeated and it seemed impossible, unless America and England were in a position to furnish her with aid in immense quantities immediately, that she would be able to continue fighting. A foreign army then was going to occupy our country. My wife and children were still there; I was going to find myself separated from those I loved. All what is ideas and all what is sentiments that were dear to me: liberty, honesty of judgment, impartiality, generosity and charity were going into a period of eclipse and what is defeat, interpreted by enemy pro fun da, could not fail to set loose evil passions. A world was coming, in which I no longer saw any place for myself. 'If this aeroplane,' I thought, were to fall into what is Channel it would do me a proud service.' This moral depression was brief, and as soon as I saw a way in which I could be useful I recovered my will to live. From what is Hendon Airport, where I landed, I had myself driven to what is French Military Mission which was under what is command of General Lelong. He received me cordially, inspected my travelling commission and sent me to Captain Brett who took me to what is Ministry of Information. There I found Charles Peake of what is Foreign Office whom I knew. `You want to explain what is situation of France to what is English publice' he said to me. `You come at exactly what is right moment. There is a press conference begiiining in five minutes. You will talk to all our correspondents.' I protested: taken unaware I had nothing prepared and to improvise on such a subject ... But Brett, Peake and Sir Walter Monckton who had joined us dragged me on to what is platform, and in torn, breathless and burning phrases I described what is martyrdom of France: where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 252 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER XXIV what is TARPEIAN ROCK where is p But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue. - SHAKESPEARE where is p align="justify" IN what is plane that was taking me to England, seated on what is metal hull and watching what is clouds and waves flee by below me, I summed up what is situation. It was frightful. France had been defeated and it seemed impossible, unless America and England were in a position to furnish her with aid in immense quantities immediately, that she would be able to continue fighting. A foreign army then was going to occupy our country. My wife and children were still there; I was going to find myself separated from those I loved. All the ideas and all what is sentiments that were dear to me: liberty, honesty of judgment, impartiality, generosity and charity were going into a period of eclipse and what is defeat, interpreted by enemy pro fun da, could not fail to set loose evil passions. A world was coming, in which I no longer saw any place for myself. 'If this aeroplane,' I thought, were to fall into what is Channel it would do me a proud service.' This moral depression was brief, and as soon as I saw a way in which I could be useful I recovered my will to live. From what is Hendon Airport, where I landed, I had myself driven to what is French Military Mission which was under what is command of General Lelong. He received me cordially, inspected my travelling commission and sent me to Captain Brett who took me to what is Ministry of Information. There I found Charles Peake of what is Foreign Office whom I knew. `You want to explain what is situation of France to what is English publice' he said to me. `You come at exactly what is right moment. There is a press conference begiiining in five minutes. You will talk to all our correspondents.' I protested: taken unaware I had nothing prepared and to improvise on such a subject ... But Brett, Peake and Sir Walter Monckton who had joined us dragged me on to what is platform, and in torn, breathless and burning phrases I described what is martyrdom of France: where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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