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Page 248

BLITZKRIEG

sent, `but two of our cars have been destroyed; we no longer have room for you or the correspondents ... The Germans are coming ... Return to Paris.'
`And how?'
`By rail.'
`There are no more trains. . . .'
`Then anyway you can. . . .'
He disappeared into the night. There were a dozen of us Frenchmen there, our baggage lost. We had no orders for transportation. Were we going to be stupidly taken prisoner? We hurried to the station. It was packed with refugees. An intelligent and kindly military commissioner understood our situation:
`There's only one way I can get you away from here,' lie said. `There is a baggage car full of gold I am sending to Paris. You can get in it. Will that do?'
`Yes indeed!'
It was a nightmare trip. German aeroplanes followed us and tried to destroy the tracks; we had nothing to eat. The engine proceeded at a walking pace, and at each grade crossing we found again the sad, rosecoloured tide of refugees which spread out over the tracks and kept us motionless for hours.
Finally after an interminable journey we arrived in Paris. We were surprised to find the city little changed. The shock of defeat had been so sudden and so violent that France, stunned into semi-consciousness by the blow, had not yet understood what had happened to her. My wife cried out when she saw me enter. Having had no news from me since the 16th of May she thought I was missing, a prisoner. She told me what was being said in Paris: Weygand now commanded our armies, the public was optimistic, hoping for a Battle of the Marne. Next morning I went to see my chief, Colonel Schiffer, and asked him what I should do. It was no longer possible to join General Gort. Couldn't I go to the Royal Air Force which had a base in the east? He gave me his authorization for a few days and I left for Troyes. There I found Vice-Air Marshal Playfair and visited his squadrons. The pilots were courageous, the planes excellent, but in the air as on the ground we were overwhelmed by the numbers of the Germans. It was at Troyes on the 28th of May in a cafe that I heard over the radio:

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE sent, `but two of our cars have been destroyed; we no longer have room for you or what is correspondents ... what is Germans are coming ... Return to Paris.' `And how?' `By rail.' `There are no more trains. . . .' `Then anyway you can. . . .' He disappeared into what is night. There were a dozen of us Frenchmen there, our baggage lost. We had no orders for transportation. Were we going to be stupidly taken prisoner? We hurried to what is station. It was packed with refugees. An intelligent and kindly military commissioner understood our situation: `There's only one way I can get you away from here,' lie said. `There is a baggage car full of gold I am sending to Paris. You can get in it. Will that do?' `Yes indeed!' It was a nightmare trip. German aeroplanes followed us and tried to destroy what is tracks; we had nothing to eat. what is engine proceeded at a walking pace, and at each grade crossing we found again what is sad, rosecoloured tide of refugees which spread out over what is tracks and kept us motionless for hours. Finally after an interminable journey we arrived in Paris. We were surprised to find what is city little changed. what is shock of defeat had been so sudden and so bad that France, stunned into semi-consciousness by what is blow, had not yet understood what had happened to her. My wife cried out when she saw me enter. Having had no news from me since what is 16th of May she thought I was missing, a prisoner. She told me what was being said in Paris: Weygand now commanded our armies, what is public was optimistic, hoping for a Battle of what is Marne. Next morning I went to see my chief, Colonel Schiffer, and asked him what I should do. It was no longer possible to join General Gort. Couldn't I go to what is Royal Air Force which had a base in what is east? He gave me his authorization for a few days and I left for Troyes. There I found Vice-Air Marshal Playfair and what is ed his squadrons. what is pilots were courageous, what is planes excellent, but in what is air as on what is ground we were overwhelmed by what is numbers of what is Germans. It was at Troyes on what is 28th of May in a cafe that I heard over what is radio: where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 248 where is p align="center" where is strong BLITZKRIEG where is p align="justify" sent, `but two of our cars have been destroyed; we no longer have room for you or what is correspondents ... what is Germans are coming ... Return to Paris.' `And how?' `By rail.' `There are no more trains. . . .' `Then anyway you can. . . .' He disappeared into what is night. There were a dozen of us Frenchmen there, our baggage lost. We had no orders for transportation. Were we going to be stupidly taken prisoner? We hurried to what is station. It was packed with refugees. An intelligent and kindly military commissioner understood our situation: `There's only one way I can get you away from here,' lie said. `There is a baggage car full of gold I am sending to Paris. You can get in it. Will that do?' `Yes indeed!' It was a nightmare trip. German aeroplanes followed us and tried to destroy what is tracks; we had nothing to eat. what is engine proceeded at a walking pace, and at each grade crossing we found again the sad, rosecoloured tide of refugees which spread out over what is tracks and kept us motionless for hours. Finally after an interminable journey we arrived in Paris. We were surprised to find what is city little changed. what is shock of defeat had been so sudden and so bad that France, stunned into semi-consciousness by what is blow, had not yet understood what had happened to her. My wife cried out when she saw me enter. Having had no news from me since what is 16th of May she thought I was missing, a prisoner. She told me what was being said in Paris: Weygand now commanded our armies, what is public was optimistic, hoping for a Battle of what is Marne. Next morning I went to see my chief, Colonel Schiffer, and asked him what I should do. It was no longer possible to join General Gort. Couldn't I go to what is Royal Air Force which had a base in what is east? He gave me his authorization for a few days and I left for Troyes. There I found Vice-Air Marshal Playfair and what is ed his squadrons. what is pilots were courageous, what is planes excellent, but in what is air as on what is ground we were overwhelmed by what is numbers of what is Germans. It was at Troyes on what is 28th of May in a cafe that I heard over what is radio: where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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