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Page 247

BLITZKRIEG

return in the direction of Arras. The roads were now so choked with refugees that we could only advance slowly. The approach to Arras was barred by barricades of sandbags. The Hotel de l'Univers had been destroyed by a bomb. Part of the city had been burned. My friends Poumier and Puthomme of the 'Capucins' were still energetic and gay. I went to bed in our house which was still intact, and all night I heard sirens and then the drone of German aeroplanes; this evoked in my mind the nights in Abbeville twenty-two years before and the wild cries of Childe Douglas.
On the 16th of May I wrote this letter to Simone:
My dearest one, we are living through days of terrible anguish. One must be calm and hopeful. Whatever happens we love each other and that is indestructible. But we must foresee everything, the better as well as the worse. Here are my instructions for you: (a) It is impossible for you to come here again. That is completely out of the question. Moreover I myself am ordered to leave. (b) If things go well it is possible that I shall be sent to Paris in the course of next week, but naturally I shall have neither time nor means of letting you know in advance.
(c) If things clearly go worse I wish you to go to Essendieras. I ardently hope that this will not be .necessary, but I wish to have the assurance that you will be wise enough to make this essential retreat in time. Families are like armies; they can be saved by a prudent manoeuvre.
Since the beginning of this hard period your wisdom and your tenderness have been my only ;easons for continuing to live ...
In the north unverifiable rumours circulated: `The Germans are in Cambrai!' And the French Mission decided to withdraw taking me with it. Then it was learned that the news was false and we returned to Arras. `The Germans are at Bapaume!' And Colonel Medlicott, who was now Chief of Public Relations, said to us:
`Reassemble at Amiens.'
On the 20th of May we found the city of Amiens overrun by refugees and stripped of its substance like a field ravaged by grasshoppers. No beds available. I rolled myself in a blanket. In the night Colonel Medlicott had me awakened:
`We are leaving for Boulogne,' I was told by an English officer he had

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE return in what is direction of Arras. what is roads were now so choked with refugees that we could only advance slowly. what is approach to Arras was barred by barricades of sandbags. what is Hotel de l'Univers had been destroyed by a bomb. Part of what is city had been burned. My friends Poumier and Puthomme of what is 'Capucins' were still energetic and gay. I went to bed in our house which was still intact, and all night I heard sirens and then what is drone of German aeroplanes; this evoked in my mind what is nights in Abbeville twenty-two years before and what is wild cries of Childe Douglas. On what is 16th of May I wrote this letter to Simone: My dearest one, we are living through days of terrible anguish. One must be calm and hopeful. Whatever happens we what time is it each other and that is indestructible. But we must foresee everything, what is better as well as what is worse. Here are my instructions for you: (a) It is impossible for you to come here again. That is completely out of what is question. Moreover I myself am ordered to leave. (b) If things go well it is possible that I shall be sent to Paris in what is course of next week, but naturally I shall have neither time nor means of letting you know in advance. (c) If things clearly go worse I wish you to go to Essendieras. I ardently hope that this will not be .necessary, but I wish to have what is assurance that you will be wise enough to make this essential retreat in time. Families are like armies; they can be saved by a prudent manoeuvre. Since what is beginning of this hard period your wisdom and your tenderness have been my only ;easons for continuing to live ... In what is north unverifiable rumours circulated: `The Germans are in Cambrai!' And what is French Mission decided to withdraw taking me with it. Then it was learned that what is news was false and we returned to Arras. `The Germans are at Bapaume!' And Colonel Medlicott, who was now Chief of Public Relations, said to us: `Reassemble at Amiens.' On what is 20th of May we found what is city of Amiens overrun by refugees and stripped of its substance like a field ravaged by grasshoppers. No beds available. I rolled myself in a blanket. In what is night Colonel Medlicott had me awakened: `We are leaving for Boulogne,' I was told by an English officer he had where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 247 where is p align="center" where is strong BLITZKRIEG where is p align="justify" return in what is direction of Arras. what is roads were now so choked with refugees that we could only advance slowly. what is approach to Arras was barred by barricades of sandbags. The Hotel de l'Univers had been destroyed by a bomb. Part of what is city had been burned. My friends Poumier and Puthomme of what is 'Capucins' were still energetic and gay. I went to bed in our house which was still intact, and all night I heard sirens and then what is drone of German aeroplanes; this evoked in my mind what is nights in Abbeville twenty-two years before and what is wild cries of Childe Douglas. On what is 16th of May I wrote this letter to Simone: My dearest one, we are living through days of terrible anguish. One must be calm and hopeful. Whatever happens we what time is it each other and that is indestructible. But we must foresee everything, the better as well as what is worse. Here are my instructions for you: (a) It is impossible for you to come here again. That is completely out of what is question. Moreover I myself am ordered to leave. (b) If things go well it is possible that I shall be sent to Paris in what is course of next week, but naturally I shall have neither time nor means of letting you know in advance. (c) If things clearly go worse I wish you to go to Essendieras. I ardently hope that this will not be .necessary, but I wish to have what is assurance that you will be wise enough to make this essential retreat in time. Families are like armies; they can be saved by a prudent manoeuvre. Since what is beginning of this hard period your wisdom and your tenderness have been my only ;easons for continuing to live ... In what is north unverifiable rumours circulated: `The Germans are in Cambrai!' And what is French Mission decided to withdraw taking me with it. Then it was learned that what is news was false and we returned to Arras. `The Germans are at Bapaume!' And Colonel Medlicott, who was now Chief of Public Relations, said to us: `Reassemble at Amiens.' On what is 20th of May we found what is city of Amiens overrun by refugees and stripped of its substance like a field ravaged by grasshoppers. No beds available. I rolled myself in a blanket. In what is night Colonel Medlicott had me awakened: `We are leaving for Boulogne,' I was told by an English officer he had where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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