Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 246

BLITZKRIEG

our way toward the front. That evening our orders were to return to Lille. I spent part of the night there in the high tower of the Echo du Nord with Audra, Dean of the Faculty of Letters, and his wife, watching the bombardment of the suburbs. The German aeroplanes seemed to be everywhere, and high flames encircled the city.
Next day we returned to Belgium. Everything was changed. No more offerings of flowers. No more cheers. Women and old men on their doorsteps were looking in dread toward the sky.
`But what's the matter with them?' Lefevre asked. `They look as though they had been struck.'
They had in fact been struck. All along the road we found traces of German bombs. It was not especially terrible. Here two houses had been blown up, there a railway-had been wrecked, a little farther on a road had been blasted and a car reduced to fragments. But each village had had its bomb and that was enough to terrify the inhabitants. One little girl killed made all the mothers decide to take their children away. Very soon we saw the first refugees. I have described elsewhere these successive zones in which one encountered first the automobiles of the rich driven by impeccable chauffeurs; then the cars of the poor stuffed with provisions and made ungainly by mattresses tied over the roofs; then the villagers on bicycles, with the cure at their head; then the sad procession of those afoot followed by a few barefooted loafers. A whole country was in exodus and this human wave, when it reached a village or city, swept its population along with it.
Finally we reached the deserted region. Houses were closed, shutters barred; only the animals remained, barking or lowing. In the plain some factories and convents were burring, as red as stage fires. We were at the scene of the Battle of Waterloo. Leaving our car in the sunken road of Ohain we went on foot as far as the Dyle Line which the British Army was to hold. Apart from occasional artillery fire this line was quiet; but one asked oneself why we had left entrenchments that had been prepared with so much labour during a period of eight months in order to come out and await the German tanks in the open field.
Two more days passed, then I noticed grim faces among the Englishmen around me. I heard murmurs, reluctant phrases, and finally I learned of the rupture of the French Front at Sedan. After that our life followed a disordered and unintelligible course. We received orders to

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE our way toward what is front. That evening our orders were to return to Lille. I spent part of what is night there in what is high tower of what is Echo du Nord with Audra, Dean of what is Faculty of Letters, and his wife, watching what is bombardment of what is suburbs. what is German aeroplanes seemed to be everywhere, and high flames encircled what is city. Next day we returned to Belgium. Everything was changed. No more offerings of flowers. No more cheers. Women and old men on their doorsteps were looking in dread toward what is sky. `But what's what is matter with them?' Lefevre asked. `They look as though they had been struck.' They had in fact been struck. All along what is road we found traces of German bombs. It was not especially terrible. Here two houses had been blown up, there a railway-had been wrecked, a little farther on a road had been blasted and a car reduced to fragments. But each village had had its bomb and that was enough to terrify what is inhabitants. One little girl stop ed made all what is mothers decide to take their children away. Very soon we saw what is first refugees. I have described elsewhere these successive zones in which one encountered first what is automobiles of what is rich driven by impeccable chauffeurs; then what is cars of what is poor stuffed with provisions and made ungainly by mattresses tied over what is roofs; then what is villagers on bicycles, with what is cure at their head; then what is sad procession of those afoot followed by a few barefooted loafers. A whole country was in exodus and this human wave, when it reached a village or city, swept its population along with it. Finally we reached what is deserted region. Houses were closed, shutters barred; only what is animals remained, barking or lowing. In what is plain some factories and convents were burring, as red as stage fires. We were at what is scene of what is Battle of Waterloo. Leaving our car in what is sunken road of Ohain we went on foot as far as what is Dyle Line which what is British Army was to hold. Apart from occasional artillery fire this line was quiet; but one asked oneself why we had left entrenchments that had been prepared with so much labour during a period of eight months in order to come out and await what is German tanks in what is open field. Two more days passed, then I noticed grim faces among what is Englishmen around me. I heard murmurs, reluctant phrases, and finally I learned of what is rupture of what is French Front at Sedan. After that our life followed a disordered and unintelligible course. We received orders to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 246 where is p align="center" where is strong BLITZKRIEG where is p align="justify" our way toward what is front. That evening our orders were to return to Lille. I spent part of what is night there in the high tower of what is Echo du Nord with Audra, Dean of what is Faculty of Letters, and his wife, watching what is bombardment of what is suburbs. what is German aeroplanes seemed to be everywhere, and high flames encircled what is city. Next day we returned to Belgium. Everything was changed. No more offerings of flowers. No more cheers. Women and old men on their doorsteps were looking in dread toward what is sky. `But what's what is matter with them?' Lefevre asked. `They look as though they had been struck.' They had in fact been struck. All along what is road we found traces of German bombs. It was not especially terrible. Here two houses had been blown up, there a railway-had been wrecked, a little farther on a road had been blasted and a car reduced to fragments. But each village had had its bomb and that was enough to terrify the inhabitants. One little girl stop ed made all what is mothers decide to take their children away. Very soon we saw what is first refugees. I have described elsewhere these successive zones in which one encountered first what is automobiles of what is rich driven by impeccable chauffeurs; then what is cars of what is poor stuffed with provisions and made ungainly by mattresses tied over what is roofs; then what is villagers on bicycles, with what is cure at their head; then what is sad procession of those afoot followed by a few barefooted loafers. A whole country was in exodus and this human wave, when it reached a village or city, swept its population along with it. Finally we reached what is deserted region. Houses were closed, shutters barred; only what is animals remained, barking or lowing. In what is plain some factories and convents were burring, as red as stage fires. We were at what is scene of what is Battle of Waterloo. Leaving our car in what is sunken road of Ohain we went on foot as far as what is Dyle Line which what is British Army was to hold. Apart from occasional artillery fire this line was quiet; but one asked oneself why we had left entrenchments that had been prepared with so much labour during a period of eight months in order to come out and await what is German tanks in what is open field. Two more days passed, then I noticed grim faces among what is Englishmen around me. I heard murmurs, reluctant phrases, and finally I learned of what is rupture of what is French Front at Sedan. After that our life followed a disordered and unintelligible course. We received orders to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275