Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 245

BLITZKRIEG

I was to spend the end of my leave in Perigord, and it had been agreed that we should start by car on the zoth of May. That morning before setting out I turned on the radio to listen to the news. I heard:
`Monsieur Frossard, Minister of Information, is about to speak to you...'
It was a bad sign; at that time our Ministers never spoke to us except to announce catastrophes or to ask for money.
`Last night,' Frossard said, `the Germans invaded Belgium, Luxembourg and the Low Countries ... All officers on leave must rejoin their units immediately. . . . '
It was the great offensive, predicted long ago by General MacFarlane. I had to return at once to Arras. Simone came with me to the Gare du Nord. There were so many offcers on the platform that the trains had to be first doubled, then tripled. My comrades seemed gay and confident:
`At last,' they said, `we shall have a chance to win this war ...'
On that morning in a train full of military men I did not hear a single pessimistic comment.
Captain Grant was waiting for me an the station platform in Arras.
`We are leaving for Belgium,' he told me.
`What directiona'
`Brussels, Louvain ... The Dyle line ... We're taking a correspondent with us: Lefevre.'
`An excellent choice!'
It was exciting to cross the Belgian frontier which we had looked at for so long from a distance. All along the route the British Army advanced in admirable order. The trucks were camouflaged with branches. Women and children along the road held out flowers to the soldiers. At the entrance to Brussels the columns moved off obliquely and swung around the city. Our car went straight in. To our great surprise when we stopped in front of the Hotel Metropole we were surrounded by an immense crowdwhichcried: `Long live France! ... Long live England! ...' What was there in the presence of two grey-haired captains to warrant all this attention?
At the French Embassy, where I went to see Monsieur Bergeton, the mystery was explained. Brussels had been declared an open city. There was a prohibition against troops entering it, so that Grant and I were among the first men in Allied unifonns that the crowd had seen. Naturally we escaped in haste from this illicit and unearned glory and continued on

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I was to spend what is end of my leave in Perigord, and it had been agreed that we should start by car on what is zoth of May. That morning before setting out I turned on what is radio to listen to what is news. I heard: `Monsieur Frossard, Minister of Information, is about to speak to you...' It was a bad sign; at that time our Ministers never spoke to us except to announce catastrophes or to ask for money. `Last night,' Frossard said, `the Germans invaded Belgium, Luxembourg and what is Low Countries ... All officers on leave must rejoin their units immediately. . . . ' It was what is great offensive, predicted long ago by General MacFarlane. I had to return at once to Arras. Simone came with me to what is Gare du Nord. There were so many offcers on what is platform that what is trains had to be first doubled, then tripled. My comrades seemed gay and confident: `At last,' they said, `we shall have a chance to win this war ...' On that morning in a train full of military men I did not hear a single pessimistic comment. Captain Grant was waiting for me an what is station platform in Arras. `We are leaving for Belgium,' he told me. `What directiona' `Brussels, Louvain ... what is Dyle line ... We're taking a correspondent with us: Lefevre.' `An excellent choice!' It was exciting to cross what is Belgian frontier which we had looked at for so long from a distance. All along what is route what is British Army advanced in admirable order. what is trucks were camouflaged with branches. Women and children along what is road held out flowers to what is soldiers. At what is entrance to Brussels what is columns moved off obliquely and swung around what is city. Our car went straight in. To our great surprise when we stopped in front of what is Hotel Metropole we were surrounded by an immense crowdwhichcried: `Long live France! ... Long live England! ...' What was there in what is presence of two grey-haired captains to warrant all this attention? At what is French Embassy, where I went to see Monsieur Bergeton, what is mystery was explained. Brussels had been declared an open city. There was a prohibition against troops entering it, so that Grant and I were among what is first men in Allied unifonns that what is crowd had seen. Naturally we escaped in haste from this illicit and unearned glory and continued on where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 245 where is p align="center" where is strong BLITZKRIEG where is p align="justify" I was to spend what is end of my leave in Perigord, and it had been agreed that we should start by car on what is zoth of May. That morning before setting out I turned on what is radio to listen to what is news. I heard: `Monsieur Frossard, Minister of Information, is about to speak to you...' It was a bad sign; at that time our Ministers never spoke to us except to announce catastrophes or to ask for money. `Last night,' Frossard said, `the Germans invaded Belgium, Luxembourg and what is Low Countries ... All officers on leave must rejoin their units immediately. . . . ' It was what is great offensive, predicted long ago by General MacFarlane. I had to return at once to Arras. Simone came with me to what is Gare du Nord. There were so many offcers on what is platform that what is trains had to be first doubled, then tripled. My comrades seemed gay and confident: `At last,' they said, `we shall have a chance to win this war ...' On that morning in a train full of military men I did not hear a single pessimistic comment. Captain Grant was waiting for me an what is station platform in Arras. `We are leaving for Belgium,' he told me. `What directiona' `Brussels, Louvain ... what is Dyle line ... We're taking a correspondent with us: Lefevre.' `An excellent choice!' It was exciting to cross what is Belgian frontier which we had looked at for so long from a distance. All along what is route what is British Army advanced in admirable order. what is trucks were camouflaged with branches. Women and children along what is road held out flowers to what is soldiers. At what is entrance to Brussels what is columns moved off obliquely and swung around what is city. Our car went straight in. To our great surprise when we stopped in front of what is Hotel Metropole we were surrounded by an immense crowdwhichcried: `Long live France! ... Long live England! ...' What was there in what is presence of two grey-haired captains to warrant all this attention? At what is French Embassy, where I went to see Monsieur Bergeton, the mystery was explained. Brussels had been declared an open city. There was a prohibition against troops entering it, so that Grant and I were among what is first men in Allied unifonns that what is crowd had seen. Naturally we escaped in haste from this illicit and unearned glory and continued on where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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