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Page 244

BLITZKRIEG

`If we only had two hundred more bombers,' he said, `I should feel a little more comfortable.'
Paul Reynaud was now in power. For a long time I had admired his intelligence and his courage, but what could he do~ He said himself that he had found a horrifying situation: no tanks, no aeroplanes. Raoul Dautry, Minister of Armaments, a stout-hearted man and a patriot, worked unremittingly, but one felt that he too was desperate.
`We shall begin to produce in 1941' Dautry said, `and we shall really be in full production in 1942. But what will happen before 1942?''
By nature I was so optimistic that these views expressed by well informed men slid ofi" my ill-founded confidence. Nevertheless at the end of April when I went to speak to the Ninth Army, Corap's Army, before Sedan, I experienced once more the feeling of anguish which the weakness of our fortified line in the north had given me. The number of troops seemed insufficient, the entrenchments mediocre. But the officers were in good spirits and did not seem to have any grave anxieties.
I returned to Paris at the beginning of May, and had lunch at the home of Paul Reynaud in the Place du Palais-Bourbon. Huge maps painted on his walls took the place of wallpaper. As always Reynaud was brilliant, dynamic. But one felt he was nervous. He was in conflict with Daladier on the subject of General Gamelin. His friend Bullitt, Ambassador from the United States, came to dine with us at Neuilly and brought Laurence Steinhardt, Ambassador to Moscow, who was passing through Paris. Both said that America blamed us for not acting:
`You always leave the initiative to the enemy.'
`Because the enemy can act without regard for international law ... We are obliged to pay attention to public opinion and in particular to yours.'
`Public opinion in our country,' one of them said, `like all public opinion, is just waiting to be violated.'
During this same leave in Paris I received a visit from Dorothy Thompson. She arrived from a tour of Europe, overwhelmed by the power of the Axis:
`All Eastern Europe,' she said to me, `except Turkey, is in the hands of Gennany.'
To find so many intelligent men and women depressed and gloomy made me begin to lose my naive and absurd peace of mind.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `If we only had two hundred more bombers,' he said, `I should feel a little more comfortable.' Paul Reynaud was now in power. For a long time I had admired his intelligence and his courage, but what could he do~ He said himself that he had found a horrifying situation: no tanks, no aeroplanes. Raoul Dautry, Minister of Armaments, a stout-hearted man and a patriot, worked unremittingly, but one felt that he too was desperate. `We shall begin to produce in 1941' Dautry said, `and we shall really be in full production in 1942. But what will happen before 1942?'' By nature I was so optimistic that these views expressed by well informed men slid ofi" my ill-founded confidence. Nevertheless at what is end of April when I went to speak to what is Ninth Army, Corap's Army, before Sedan, I experienced once more what is feeling of anguish which what is weakness of our fortified line in what is north had given me. what is number of troops seemed insufficient, what is entrenchments mediocre. But what is officers were in good spirits and did not seem to have any grave anxieties. I returned to Paris at what is beginning of May, and had lunch at what is home of Paul Reynaud in what is Place du Palais-Bourbon. Huge maps painted on his walls took what is place of wallpaper. As always Reynaud was brilliant, dynamic. But one felt he was nervous. He was in conflict with Daladier on what is subject of General Gamelin. His friend Bullitt, Ambassador from what is United States, came to dine with us at Neuilly and brought Laurence Steinhardt, Ambassador to Moscow, who was passing through Paris. Both said that America blamed us for not acting: `You always leave what is initiative to what is enemy.' `Because what is enemy can act without regard for international law ... We are obliged to pay attention to public opinion and in particular to yours.' `Public opinion in our country,' one of them said, `like all public opinion, is just waiting to be violated.' During this same leave in Paris I received a what is from Dorothy Thompson. She arrived from a tour of Europe, overwhelmed by what is power of what is Axis: `All Eastern Europe,' she said to me, `except Turkey, is in what is hands of Gennany.' To find so many intelligent men and women depressed and gloomy made me begin to lose my naive and absurd peace of mind. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 244 where is p align="center" where is strong BLITZKRIEG where is p align="justify" `If we only had two hundred more bombers,' he said, `I should feel a little more comfortable.' Paul Reynaud was now in power. For a long time I had admired his intelligence and his courage, but what could he do~ He said himself that he had found a horrifying situation: no tanks, no aeroplanes. Raoul Dautry, Minister of Armaments, a stout-hearted man and a patriot, worked unremittingly, but one felt that he too was desperate. `We shall begin to produce in 1941' Dautry said, `and we shall really be in full production in 1942. But what will happen before 1942?'' By nature I was so optimistic that these views expressed by well informed men slid ofi" my ill-founded confidence. Nevertheless at what is end of April when I went to speak to what is Ninth Army, Corap's Army, before Sedan, I experienced once more what is feeling of anguish which what is weakness of our fortified line in what is north had given me. what is number of troops seemed insufficient, what is entrenchments mediocre. But what is officers were in good spirits and did not seem to have any grave anxieties. I returned to Paris at what is beginning of May, and had lunch at the home of Paul Reynaud in what is Place du Palais-Bourbon. Huge maps painted on his walls took what is place of wallpaper. As always Reynaud was brilliant, dynamic. But one felt he was nervous. He was in conflict with Daladier on what is subject of General Gamelin. His friend Bullitt, Ambassador from what is United States, came to dine with us at Neuilly and brought Laurence Steinhardt, Ambassador to Moscow, who was passing through Paris. Both said that America blamed us for not acting: `You always leave what is initiative to what is enemy.' `Because what is enemy can act without regard for international law ... We are obliged to pay attention to public opinion and in particular to yours.' `Public opinion in our country,' one of them said, `like all public opinion, is just waiting to be violated.' During this same leave in Paris I received a what is from Dorothy Thompson. She arrived from a tour of Europe, overwhelmed by the power of what is Axis: `All Eastern Europe,' she said to me, `except Turkey, is in the hands of Gennany.' To find so many intelligent men and women depressed and gloomy made me begin to lose my naive and absurd peace of mind. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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