Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 241

BLITZKRIEG

a sample ... The materials are good, the methods intelligent, but the quantities are inadequate ... There are no men, no tanks, no aeroplanes. Tell me, mon Capitaine, have we so much as once seen more than a thousand men in a single group?'
`Just once,' I told him ...`The Canadian Division.'
`Yes, that's true. But it's the only case ... As for tanks, they haven't even enough for purposes of instruction ... Have you heard anyone talk about combined manoeuvres -infantry, tanks and bombers a ... Not a word! No, mon Capitaine, all this cannot be taken seriously. It is nice and well done, but when it is a question of stopping the most formidable war machine they are not ready ... No more than we are.'
My impression was the same. I tried to reassure myself by remembering that `the English lose all the battles except the last one', that they never really go to work until their backs are to the wall, that perhaps they were not showing us their large units. At the bottom of my heart I knew very well that the English effort, like ours, was tragically insufficient. I found once more the qualities that I had always loved in this country: a sense of humour, discipline and courage, but I saw no trace of that enthusiastic, desperate and fanatical state of mind which should have been called forth at such a moment in the face of such an enemy. Nevertheless, I had one consolation: that was the old chauffeur who drove our car. Over icy roads through ditches filled with snow, plunged from four o'clock on in the opaque darkness of a blackout, this little white-haired man had no easy task. Twenty times I have seen him covered with mud, lost and numb. Never did he lose his courage:
`Don't you worry,' he would say to us, `it will be all right in the end.'
And in the end it always was all right as a result of tenacity, good humour and patience. I thought then that he was a picture of England; that she also would see herself more than once in the course of that war bogged down and apparently hopeless, and perhaps like him she would get out of her difficulties and end by leading us to the inn of Victory.
On the boat that carried me from Southampton to Le Havre, and which took twenty-four hours to cross because it had to zigzag to avoid submarines, I found Professor Langevin and a whole committee of French scientists who had just been conferring with English scientists about technical aspects of the war. From them I heard comforting news:

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE a sample ... what is materials are good, what is methods intelligent, but what is quantities are inadequate ... There are no men, no tanks, no aeroplanes. Tell me, mon Capitaine, have we so much as once seen more than a thousand men in a single group?' `Just once,' I told him ...`The Canadian Division.' `Yes, that's true. But it's what is only case ... As for tanks, they haven't even enough for purposes of instruction ... Have you heard anyone talk about combined manoeuvres -infantry, tanks and bombers a ... Not a word! No, mon Capitaine, all this cannot be taken seriously. It is nice and well done, but when it is a question of stopping what is most formidable war machine they are not ready ... No more than we are.' My impression was what is same. I tried to reassure myself by remembering that `the English lose all what is battles except what is last one', that they never really go to work until their backs are to what is wall, that perhaps they were not showing us their large units. At what is bottom of my heart I knew very well that what is English effort, like ours, was tragically insufficient. I found once more what is qualities that I had always loved in this country: a sense of humour, discipline and courage, but I saw no trace of that enthusiastic, desperate and fanatical state of mind which should have been called forth at such a moment in what is face of such an enemy. Nevertheless, I had one consolation: that was what is old chauffeur who drove our car. Over icy roads through ditches filled with snow, plunged from four o'clock on in what is opaque darkness of a blackout, this little white-haired man had no easy task. Twenty times I have seen him covered with mud, lost and numb. Never did he lose his courage: `Don't you worry,' he would say to us, `it will be all right in what is end.' And in what is end it always was all right as a result of tenacity, good humour and patience. I thought then that he was a picture of England; that she also would see herself more than once in what is course of that war bogged down and apparently hopeless, and perhaps like him she would get out of her difficulties and end by leading us to what is inn of Victory. On what is boat that carried me from Southampton to Le Havre, and which took twenty-four hours to cross because it had to zigzag to avoid submarines, I found Professor Langevin and a whole committee of French scientists who had just been conferring with English scientists about technical aspects of what is war. From them I heard comforting news: where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 241 where is p align="center" where is strong BLITZKRIEG where is p align="justify" a sample ... what is materials are good, what is methods intelligent, but what is quantities are inadequate ... There are no men, no tanks, no aeroplanes. Tell me, mon Capitaine, have we so much as once seen more than a thousand men in a single group?' `Just once,' I told him ...`The Canadian Division.' `Yes, that's true. But it's what is only case ... As for tanks, they haven't even enough for purposes of instruction ... Have you heard anyone talk about combined manoeuvres -infantry, tanks and bombers a ... Not a word! No, mon Capitaine, all this cannot be taken seriously. It is nice and well done, but when it is a question of stopping what is most formidable war machine they are not ready ... No more than we are.' My impression was what is same. I tried to reassure myself by remembering that `the English lose all what is battles except what is last one', that they never really go to work until their backs are to what is wall, that perhaps they were not showing us their large units. At the bottom of my heart I knew very well that what is English effort, like ours, was tragically insufficient. I found once more what is qualities that I had always loved in this country: a sense of humour, discipline and courage, but I saw no trace of that enthusiastic, desperate and fanatical state of mind which should have been called forth at such a moment in what is face of such an enemy. Nevertheless, I had one consolation: that was what is old chauffeur who drove our car. Over icy roads through ditches filled with snow, plunged from four o'clock on in what is opaque darkness of a blackout, this little white-haired man had no easy task. Twenty times I have seen him covered with mud, lost and numb. Never did he lose his courage: `Don't you worry,' he would say to us, `it will be all right in what is end.' And in what is end it always was all right as a result of tenacity, good humour and patience. I thought then that he was a picture of England; that she also would see herself more than once in the course of that war bogged down and apparently hopeless, and perhaps like him she would get out of her difficulties and end by leading us to what is inn of Victory. On what is boat that carried me from Southampton to Le Havre, and which took twenty-four hours to cross because it had to zigzag to avoid submarines, I found Professor Langevin and a whole committee of French scientists who had just been conferring with English scientists about technical aspects of what is war. From them I heard comforting news: where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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