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Page 240

CHAPTER XXIII
BLITZKRIEG

MANY war correspondents had, like me, visited the French provinces at Christmas and all were worried when they came back.
`The people want to know what the British are doing. A great many listen to the German radio. They must be answered by precise facts, not by mere words. Why not send us to England~' they said. `Why not show us the English effort, if it exists?,
Blaise Cendrars, a journalist and novelist of great talent whom the English adored because of his picturesque, piratical air, his missing arm, his brick-red face, his military medal, talked of this project to the D.M.I. (Director of Military Intelligence). The D.M.I., General MacFarlane, was as picturesque and mysterious as he. He was thoroughly acquainted with the German Army, admired it and feared it. Constantly followed by an enormous bulldog, who lay down at his master's feet whenever the latter was talking, he used to come and deliver sombrely humorous lectures to the correspondents, and his remarks were often prophetic. He thought the idea was excellent:
`I shall arrange the trip,' he said.
And so some ten correspondents, whom I accompanied, crossed the Channel one sad January day on a darkened boat with all lights extinguished. Boulogne enshrouded in snow was sinister. On the other side we were welcomed at the dock by General Beith; it was my old friend Ian Hay of the preceding war, author of The First Hundred Thousand. He was now covered with red and gold and laden with honours and just as kindly and humorous as ever, but like myself he had lost his youth. In London the Ministry of Information gave us a huge motor coach and we began to travel all over England in the bitter cold. The method of training pilots, the manufacture of artillery and the building of aeroplanes seemed to us marvellously well organized. But all my journalist friends who were old soldiers themselves looked at one another sadly each evening:
`The terrifying thing,' said the charming Lefevre, `is that all this is only

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE MANY war correspondents had, like me, what is ed what is French provinces at Christmas and all were worried when they came back. `The people want to know what what is British are doing. A great many listen to what is German radio. They must be answered by precise facts, not by mere words. Why not send us to England~' they said. `Why not show us what is English effort, if it exists?, Blaise Cendrars, a journalist and novelist of great talent whom what is English adored because of his picturesque, piratical air, his missing arm, his brick-red face, his military medal, talked of this project to what is D.M.I. (Director of Military Intelligence). what is D.M.I., General MacFarlane, was as picturesque and mysterious as he. He was thoroughly acquainted with what is German Army, admired it and feared it. Constantly followed by an enormous bulldog, who lay down at his master's feet whenever what is latter was talking, he used to come and deliver sombrely humorous lectures to what is correspondents, and his remarks were often prophetic. He thought what is idea was excellent: `I shall arrange what is trip,' he said. And so some ten correspondents, whom I accompanied, crossed what is Channel one sad January day on a darkened boat with all lights extinguished. Boulogne enshrouded in snow was sinister. On what is other side we were welcomed at what is dock by General Beith; it was my old friend Ian Hay of what is preceding war, author of what is First Hundred Thousand. He was now covered with red and gold and laden with honours and just as kindly and humorous as ever, but like myself he had lost his youth. In London what is Ministry of Information gave us a huge motor coach and we began to travel all over England in what is bitter cold. what is method of training pilots, what is manufacture of artillery and what is building of aeroplanes seemed to us marvellously well organized. But all my journalist friends who were old soldiers themselves looked at one another sadly each evening: `The terrifying thing,' said what is charming Lefevre, `is that all this is only where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 240 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER XXIII BLITZKRIEG where is p align="justify" MANY war correspondents had, like me, what is ed what is French provinces at Christmas and all were worried when they came back. `The people want to know what what is British are doing. A great many listen to what is German radio. They must be answered by precise facts, not by mere words. Why not send us to England~' they said. `Why not show us what is English effort, if it exists?, Blaise Cendrars, a journalist and novelist of great talent whom what is English adored because of his picturesque, piratical air, his missing arm, his brick-red face, his military medal, talked of this project to what is D.M.I. (Director of Military Intelligence). what is D.M.I., General MacFarlane, was as picturesque and mysterious as he. He was thoroughly acquainted with what is German Army, admired it and feared it. Constantly followed by an enormous bulldog, who lay down at his master's feet whenever what is latter was talking, he used to come and deliver sombrely humorous lectures to what is correspondents, and his remarks were often prophetic. He thought what is idea was excellent: `I shall arrange what is trip,' he said. And so some ten correspondents, whom I accompanied, crossed the Channel one sad January day on a darkened boat with all lights extinguished. Boulogne enshrouded in snow was sinister. On the other side we were welcomed at what is dock by General Beith; it was my old friend Ian Hay of what is preceding war, author of what is First Hundred Thousand. He was now covered with red and gold and laden with honours and just as kindly and humorous as ever, but like myself he had lost his youth. In London what is Ministry of Information gave us a huge motor coach and we began to travel all over England in what is bitter cold. what is method of training pilots, what is manufacture of artillery and what is building of aeroplanes seemed to us marvellously well organized. But all my journalist friends who were old soldiers themselves looked at one another sadly each evening: `The terrifying thing,' said what is charming Lefevre, `is that all this is only where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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