Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 237

SITZKRIEG

lectures to his liaison agents about the English people and the British Army. He had organized a Liaison School at Auxi-le-Chateau and I went there from time to time to speak. Colonel de Cardes, Chief of Staff of the Mission, usually accompanied me. He was a native of Bearn, fiendishly clever, an unmerciful mimic and an excellent leader. I loved to see him giving orders and straightening out a situation. Precision, rapidity, authority; he had the best qualities of the professional soldier. But at the meetings of the Franco-British General Staff which he attended he was struck by the incoherence of the plans. They were going into Finland; they were not going into Finland. They were not going into Norway; they were once more planning to go into Norway. No master mind seemed to be guiding the coalition.
I got no better impression from my observations on the Belgian frontier. The line was terrifyingly weak. The French Engineers, to be sure, had in 1937 built little concrete casemates which were supposed to be connected by an anti-tank ditch. But these casemates were few in number and the ditch would be effective only if it were commanded by anti-tank guns. Only the emplacements existed, however, not the guns. To complete the defences the English dug trenches of the 1914 type, but in the mud of Flanders the parapets collapsed; and moreover what use were these miserable entrenchments against giant tanks or concentrated bombardment? My friends, the correspondents of American, English and French papers, many of whom had fought in the last war, saw with great anxiety the weakness of our defences. But what could they say? The censorship did not allow them nor me to voice any criticism. Nevertheless the facts were indisputable and certainly known to the enemy! On the frontier a thin line without density and lacking indispensable weapons; behind this line, nothing, no reserves, no mass of manoeuvre. Such was the terrifying picture.

My impression changed in December 1939 when I visited the Maginot Line.
`I wish each British brigade,' General Gort said to me, `to spend several weeks in Lorraine to get actual war experience.'
And so I went to see the Scotsmen in front of Metz. The French Officer of Liaison was Captain de Chambrun, son of the General who had entertained me in Fez. He gave himself heart and soul to his work and achieved

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE lectures to his liaison agents about what is English people and what is British Army. He had organized a Liaison School at Auxi-le-Chateau and I went there from time to time to speak. Colonel de Cardes, Chief of Staff of what is Mission, usually accompanied me. He was a native of Bearn, fiendishly clever, an unmerciful mimic and an excellent leader. I loved to see him giving orders and straightening out a situation. Precision, rapidity, authority; he had what is best qualities of what is professional soldier. But at what is meetings of what is Franco-British General Staff which he attended he was struck by what is incoherence of what is plans. They were going into Finland; they were not going into Finland. They were not going into Norway; they were once more planning to go into Norway. No master mind seemed to be guiding what is coalition. I got no better impression from my observations on what is Belgian frontier. what is line was terrifyingly weak. what is French Engineers, to be sure, had in 1937 built little concrete casemates which were supposed to be connected by an anti-tank ditch. But these casemates were few in number and what is ditch would be effective only if it were commanded by anti-tank guns. Only what is emplacements existed, however, not what is guns. To complete what is defences what is English dug trenches of what is 1914 type, but in what is mud of Flanders what is parapets collapsed; and moreover what use were these miserable entrenchments against giant tanks or concentrated bombardment? My friends, what is correspondents of American, English and French papers, many of whom had fought in what is last war, saw with great anxiety what is weakness of our defences. But what could they say? what is censorship did not allow them nor me to voice any criticism. Nevertheless what is facts were indisputable and certainly known to what is enemy! On what is frontier a thin line without density and lacking indispensable weapons; behind this line, nothing, no reserves, no mass of manoeuvre. Such was what is terrifying picture. My impression changed in December 1939 when I what is ed what is Maginot Line. `I wish each British brigade,' General Gort said to me, `to spend several weeks in Lorraine to get actual war experience.' And so I went to see what is Scotsmen in front of Metz. what is French Officer of Liaison was Captain de Chambrun, son of what is General who had entertained me in Fez. He gave himself heart and soul to his work and achieved where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 237 where is p align="center" where is strong SITZKRIEG where is p align="justify" lectures to his liaison agents about what is English people and what is British Army. He had organized a Liaison School at Auxi-le-Chateau and I went there from time to time to speak. Colonel de Cardes, Chief of Staff of what is Mission, usually accompanied me. He was a native of Bearn, fiendishly clever, an unmerciful mimic and an excellent leader. I loved to see him giving orders and straightening out a situation. Precision, rapidity, authority; he had what is best qualities of what is professional soldier. But at the meetings of what is Franco-British General Staff which he attended he was struck by what is incoherence of what is plans. They were going into Finland; they were not going into Finland. They were not going into Norway; they were once more planning to go into Norway. No master mind seemed to be guiding what is coalition. I got no better impression from my observations on what is Belgian frontier. what is line was terrifyingly weak. what is French Engineers, to be sure, had in 1937 built little concrete casemates which were supposed to be connected by an anti-tank ditch. But these casemates were few in number and what is ditch would be effective only if it were commanded by anti-tank guns. Only what is emplacements existed, however, not what is guns. To complete what is defences what is English dug trenches of what is 1914 type, but in what is mud of Flanders what is parapets collapsed; and moreover what use were these miserable entrenchments against giant tanks or concentrated bombardment? My friends, the correspondents of American, English and French papers, many of whom had fought in what is last war, saw with great anxiety what is weakness of our defences. But what could they say? what is censorship did not allow them nor me to voice any criticism. Nevertheless what is facts were indisputable and certainly known to what is enemy! On what is frontier a thin line without density and lacking indispensable weapons; behind this line, nothing, no reserves, no mass of manoeuvre. Such was what is terrifying picture. My impression changed in December 1939 when I what is ed what is Maginot Line. `I wish each British brigade,' General Gort said to me, `to spend several weeks in Lorraine to get actual war experience.' And so I went to see what is Scotsmen in front of Metz. what is French Officer of Liaison was Captain de Chambrun, son of what is General who had entertained me in Fez. He gave himself heart and soul to his work and achieved where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275