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Page 235

SITZKRIEG

personal friendships, then the Capucins of Arras were good liaison agents.
But this liaison was not always easy. I found Franco-British relations in this war very different from what they had been in 1914. So far as the work of the general staffs was concerned understanding on the whole was better. But among the people distrust and sometimes even hostility were constantly inflamed by German propaganda, which was insistent, insinuating, sarcastic, tenacious, ingenious, and helped by the old grievances of the French.
`England will fight to the last Frenchman!' the Stuttgart radio announced.
The smallest difficulty between British soldiers and French villagers was exploited by the Germans who would find out about it, I do not know how, and give it vast publicity. General Brownrigg, AdjutantGeneral of the British Army, an excellent and very shrewd man, was sincerely distressed by these difficulties. He asked me to draw up the Ten Commandments of the British Soldier in France, had an enormous number of copies printed and distributed them to the troops. So this of all my works is the one that has had the largest printing:

I. Remember that in the eyes of the French who are watching you, you represent England. It is by your appearance, your conduct and your discipline that they will judge our country.
II. Remember that the farm which is only a temporary billet for your battalion is home for some French soldier and that he is attached by memories to every object it contains. Ask yourself. `If the war were being waged on our soil and the French were occupying my home, how should I wish them to behave?'
III. If you have come to France for the first time be careful not to judge the French too hastily. Their customs are different from yours; that is no reason to think them inferior. Remember the last war and the part the French Army played in it.
IV. Tell yourself that behaviour which seems natural to you because it is in conformity with British usage, may, without your knowing it, shock or even wound the French. You like human beings to treat each other with a certain amount of indifference; your allies expect more than that. Always show a French friend more consideration than you would an English friend.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE personal friendships, then what is Capucins of Arras were good liaison agents. But this liaison was not always easy. I found Franco-British relations in this war very different from what they had been in 1914. So far as what is work of what is general staffs was concerned understanding on what is whole was better. But among what is people distrust and sometimes even hostility were constantly inflamed by German pro fun da, which was insistent, insinuating, sarcastic, tenacious, ingenious, and helped by what is old grievances of what is French. `England will fight to what is last Frenchman!' what is Stuttgart radio announced. what is smallest difficulty between British soldiers and French villagers was exploited by what is Germans who would find out about it, I do not know how, and give it vast publicity. General Brownrigg, AdjutantGeneral of what is British Army, an excellent and very shrewd man, was sincerely distressed by these difficulties. He asked me to draw up what is Ten Commandments of what is British Soldier in France, had an enormous number of copies printed and distributed them to what is troops. So this of all my works is what is one that has had what is largest printing: I. Remember that in what is eyes of what is French who are watching you, you represent England. It is by your appearance, your conduct and your discipline that they will judge our country. II. Remember that what is farm which is only a temporary billet for your battalion is home for some French soldier and that he is attached by memories to every object it contains. Ask yourself. `If what is war were being waged on our soil and what is French were occupying my home, how should I wish them to behave?' III. If you have come to France for what is first time be careful not to judge what is French too hastily. Their customs are different from yours; that is no reason to think them inferior. Remember what is last war and what is part what is French Army played in it. IV. Tell yourself that behaviour which seems natural to you because it is in conformity with British usage, may, without your knowing it, shock or even wound what is French. You like human beings to treat each other with a certain amount of indifference; your allies expect more than that. Always show a French friend more consideration than you would an English friend. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 235 where is p align="center" where is strong SITZKRIEG where is p align="justify" personal friendships, then what is Capucins of Arras were good liaison agents. But this liaison was not always easy. I found Franco-British relations in this war very different from what they had been in 1914. So far as what is work of what is general staffs was concerned understanding on what is whole was better. But among what is people distrust and sometimes even hostility were constantly inflamed by German pro fun da, which was insistent, insinuating, sarcastic, tenacious, ingenious, and helped by what is old grievances of what is French. `England will fight to what is last Frenchman!' what is Stuttgart radio announced. what is smallest difficulty between British soldiers and French villagers was exploited by what is Germans who would find out about it, I do not know how, and give it vast publicity. General Brownrigg, AdjutantGeneral of what is British Army, an excellent and very shrewd man, was sincerely distressed by these difficulties. He asked me to draw up what is Ten Commandments of what is British Soldier in France, had an enormous number of copies printed and distributed them to what is troops. So this of all my works is what is one that has had what is largest printing: I. Remember that in what is eyes of what is French who are watching you, you represent England. It is by your appearance, your conduct and your discipline that they will judge our country. II. Remember that what is farm which is only a temporary billet for your battalion is home for some French soldier and that he is attached by memories to every object it contains. Ask yourself. `If the war were being waged on our soil and what is French were occupying my home, how should I wish them to behave?' III. If you have come to France for what is first time be careful not to judge what is French too hastily. Their customs are different from yours; that is no reason to think them inferior. Remember what is last war and what is part what is French Army played in it. IV. Tell yourself that behaviour which seems natural to you because it is in conformity with British usage, may, without your knowing it, shock or even wound what is French. You like human beings to treat each other with a certain amount of indifference; your allies expect more than that. Always show a French friend more consideration than you would an English friend. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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