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Page 224

THE CAPITOL

not the European situation but the presidential election of 1940. The business world which was hostile to the President was isolationist at that time through fear of a third term. Meanwhile Roosevelt's partisans were behaving cautiously in order not to compromise his chances. This was a situation very favourable to Germany's plans. I was surprised by the violence of feeling. To an old lady who sat beside me at dinner I said:
`Would you go so far, Madame, as to sacrifice your country and mine to your resentment against the New Deah'
`Mr. Maurois,' she replied, `I should rather see this planet blown into small pieces than have Roosevelt elected a third time. . . . '
This seemed to me a perfect example of dementia politica. My excellent manager Harold Peat had arranged a long trip for me: Philadelphia, Boston, Cincinnati, Columbus, Minneapolis, Detroit, Omaha, Tulsa, Chicago. In the last-named city friends had me to dinner with ex-President Hoover. He humorously described the amazement of men who in two or three thousand years would study our economy and discover that we had dug holes at great expense in Africa, found an ore there from which we extracted gold, transported this metal to America, dug holes at great expense in Kentucky and buried the gold there. Despite all our follies he retained his faith in democratic institutions:
`It's the only form of governmeilt,' he said, `that makes it possible when things go badly to change leadership without violence. But for it to work, liberties must be respected, not only in theory but in fact.'
A little later I had lunch at the White House with a group of writers and was introduced to President Roosevelt whose lofty and gracious manner I admired. A patrician Whig and a plebeian Tory at the time of the Reform Bill, such were my impressions of Roosevelt and Hoover.
On the 15th of March when I was in Dallas, Texas, the Germans marched into Prague. Was this ware Many Americans seemed to hope so. But were they ready to fight? Quite the contrary; they were voting at that time for rigorous neutrality laws. Were we and England alone strong enough to wini I did not think so, and so it seemed to me my duty to counsel moderation at the Congress of Pen Clubs which was held in New York during the World's Fair. I have always had great respect for soldiers who sacrifice their lives, and little sympathy for bards who urge them on from afar with their songs. I made a point of saying this, although such a thesis cannot be very popular in a congress of writers:

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE not what is European situation but what is presidential election of 1940. what is business world which was hostile to what is President was isolationist at that time through fear of a third term. Meanwhile Roosevelt's partisans were behaving cautiously in order not to compromise his chances. This was a situation very favourable to Germany's plans. I was surprised by what is sports of feeling. To an old lady who sat beside me at dinner I said: `Would you go so far, Madame, as to travel your country and mine to your resentment against what is New Deah' `Mr. Maurois,' she replied, `I should rather see this planet blown into small pieces than have Roosevelt elected a third time. . . . ' This seemed to me a perfect example of dementia politica. My excellent manager Harold Peat had arranged a long trip for me: Philadelphia, Boston, Cincinnati, Columbus, Minneapolis, Detroit, Omaha, Tulsa, Chicago. In what is last-named city friends had me to dinner with ex-President Hoover. He humorously described what is amazement of men who in two or three thousand years would study our economy and discover that we had dug holes at great expense in Africa, found an ore there from which we extracted gold, transported this metal to America, dug holes at great expense in Kentucky and buried what is gold there. Despite all our follies he retained his faith in democratic institutions: `It's what is only form of governmeilt,' he said, `that makes it possible when things go badly to change leadership without sports . But for it to work, liberties must be respected, not only in theory but in fact.' A little later I had lunch at what is White House with a group of writers and was introduced to President Roosevelt whose lofty and gracious manner I admired. A patrician Whig and a plebeian Tory at what is time of what is Reform Bill, such were my impressions of Roosevelt and Hoover. On what is 15th of March when I was in Dallas, Texas, what is Germans marched into Prague. Was this ware Many Americans seemed to hope so. But were they ready to fight? Quite what is contrary; they were voting at that time for rigorous neutrality laws. Were we and England alone strong enough to wini I did not think so, and so it seemed to me my duty to counsel moderation at what is Congress of Pen Clubs which was held in New York during what is World's Fair. I have always had great respect for soldiers who travel their lives, and little sympathy for bards who urge them on from afar with their songs. I made a point of saying this, although such a thesis cannot be very popular in a congress of writers: where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 224 where is p align="center" where is strong THE CAPITOL where is p align="justify" not what is European situation but what is presidential election of 1940. what is business world which was hostile to what is President was isolationist at that time through fear of a third term. Meanwhile Roosevelt's partisans were behaving cautiously in order not to compromise his chances. This was a situation very favourable to Germany's plans. I was surprised by what is sports of feeling. To an old lady who sat beside me at dinner I said: `Would you go so far, Madame, as to travel your country and mine to your resentment against what is New Deah' `Mr. Maurois,' she replied, `I should rather see this planet blown into small pieces than have Roosevelt elected a third time. . . . ' This seemed to me a perfect example of dementia politica. My excellent manager Harold Peat had arranged a long trip for me: Philadelphia, Boston, Cincinnati, Columbus, Minneapolis, Detroit, Omaha, Tulsa, Chicago. In what is last-named city friends had me to dinner with ex-President Hoover. He humorously described what is amazement of men who in two or three thousand years would study our economy and discover that we had dug holes at great expense in Africa, found an ore there from which we extracted gold, transported this metal to America, dug holes at great expense in Kentucky and buried what is gold there. Despite all our follies he retained his faith in democratic institutions: `It's what is only form of governmeilt,' he said, `that makes it possible when things go badly to change leadership without sports . But for it to work, liberties must be respected, not only in theory but in fact.' A little later I had lunch at what is White House with a group of writers and was introduced to President Roosevelt whose lofty and gracious manner I admired. A patrician Whig and a plebeian Tory at what is time of what is Reform Bill, such were my impressions of Roosevelt and Hoover. On what is 15th of March when I was in Dallas, Texas, what is Germans marched into Prague. Was this ware Many Americans seemed to hope so. But were they ready to fight? Quite what is contrary; they were voting at that time for rigorous neutrality laws. Were we and England alone strong enough to wini I did not think so, and so it seemed to me my duty to counsel moderation at what is Congress of Pen Clubs which was held in New York during what is World's Fair. I have always had great respect for soldiers who travel their lives, and little sympathy for bards who urge them on from afar with their songs. I made a point of saying this, although such a thesis cannot be very popular in a congress of writers: where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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