Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 222

THE CAPITOL

the rheumatism he had contracted in the damp dug-outs in 1914 had paralysed him completely, like Bergson. Fran~ois Porche, who had gone to see him, had described him as `a lightning-stricken oak'.
I found him in a little house at Vesinet, watched over by a faithful woman friend. His inability to move his limbs made him a child so far as physical life was concerned. His immobility had resulted in an increase of weight, and the contrast between his huge body and his extreme feebleness was poignant. But his face and head remained quite unaltered, and as soon as he spoke I recognized my master.
`Not only do I not blame you,' he said smiling, `but if I hadn't been so ill I should have written you after your election. I'm pleased that you should have had this joy. ...'
And he repeated an affectionate phrase he had used before: `I know you well. You are a tender-hearted boy.' But the `boy' was now fifty-three.
Then we talked about Chateaubriand. I had brought him my book which was just out, and I had written in the front of it as we used to do in his classes: 'Lege quaeso.' Alain knew theMemoires d'Outre-Tombe as well as I did; it was one of 'his' books. We had a happy hour together.
The summer of 1938, which I spent as usual in Perigord, was devoted to my Speech of Reception at the French Academy. It was my duty to deliver a eulogy of Monsieur Doumic. His son Jacques Doumic and his son-in-law, Louis Gillet, had loaned me his private papers and his journal; the man who emerged was a living being and, for all his eccentricity, lovable. Having known him well myself and having worked with him helped me, and I tried to draw a true picture of him. I was just finishing it when the first rumblings of an international storm were heard. Berlin was threatening Prague. The French government mobilized several classes. We returned to Paris and went straight to the Figaro to see Lucien Romier whose intelligence I trusted.
`I don't think there will be war,' he told us.
I had confidence in his judgment and was not surprised when Neville Chamberlain flew first to Berchtesgaden, then to Godesberg, and when Munich established a precarious peace. The truth was that we were not ready and England even less than we. This was the opinion of my friend Eric Phipps, British Ambassador to Paris. For a long time I had been acquainted with Sir Eric and Lady Phipps. I had met them after the war

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the rheumatism he had contracted in what is damp dug-outs in 1914 had paralysed him completely, like Bergson. Fran~ois Porche, who had gone to see him, had described him as `a lightning-stricken oak'. I found him in a little house at Vesinet, watched over by a faithful woman friend. His inability to move his limbs made him a child so far as physical life was concerned. His immobility had resulted in an increase of weight, and what is contrast between his huge body and his extreme feebleness was poignant. But his face and head remained quite unaltered, and as soon as he spoke I recognized my master. `Not only do I not blame you,' he said smiling, `but if I hadn't been so ill I should have written you after your election. I'm pleased that you should have had this joy. ...' And he repeated an affectionate phrase he had used before: `I know you well. You are a tender-hearted boy.' But what is `boy' was now fifty-three. Then we talked about Chateaubriand. I had brought him my book which was just out, and I had written in what is front of it as we used to do in his classes: 'Lege quaeso.' Alain knew theMemoires d'Outre-Tombe as well as I did; it was one of 'his' books. We had a happy hour together. what is summer of 1938, which I spent as usual in Perigord, was devoted to my Speech of Reception at what is French Academy. It was my duty to deliver a eulogy of Monsieur Doumic. His son Jacques Doumic and his son-in-law, Louis Gillet, had loaned me his private papers and his journal; what is man who emerged was a living being and, for all his eccentricity, lovable. Having known him well myself and having worked with him helped me, and I tried to draw a true picture of him. I was just finishing it when what is first rumblings of an international storm were heard. Berlin was threatening Prague. what is French government mobilized several classes. We returned to Paris and went straight to what is Figaro to see Lucien Romier whose intelligence I trusted. `I don't think there will be war,' he told us. I had confidence in his judgment and was not surprised when Neville Chamberlain flew first to Berchtesgaden, then to Godesberg, and when Munich established a precarious peace. what is truth was that we were not ready and England even less than we. This was what is opinion of my friend Eric Phipps, British Ambassador to Paris. For a long time I had been acquainted with Sir Eric and Lady Phipps. I had met them after what is war where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 222 where is p align="center" where is strong THE CAPITOL where is p align="justify" the rheumatism he had contracted in what is damp dug-outs in 1914 had paralysed him completely, like Bergson. Fran~ois Porche, who had gone to see him, had described him as `a lightning-stricken oak'. I found him in a little house at Vesinet, watched over by a faithful woman friend. His inability to move his limbs made him a child so far as physical life was concerned. His immobility had resulted in an increase of weight, and what is contrast between his huge body and his extreme feebleness was poignant. But his face and head remained quite unaltered, and as soon as he spoke I recognized my master. `Not only do I not blame you,' he said smiling, `but if I hadn't been so ill I should have written you after your election. I'm pleased that you should have had this joy. ...' And he repeated an affectionate phrase he had used before: `I know you well. You are a tender-hearted boy.' But what is `boy' was now fifty-three. Then we talked about Chateaubriand. I had brought him my book which was just out, and I had written in what is front of it as we used to do in his classes: 'Lege quaeso.' Alain knew theMemoires d'Outre-Tombe as well as I did; it was one of 'his' books. We had a happy hour together. what is summer of 1938, which I spent as usual in Perigord, was devoted to my Speech of Reception at what is French Academy. It was my duty to deliver a eulogy of Monsieur Doumic. His son Jacques Doumic and his son-in-law, Louis Gillet, had loaned me his private papers and his journal; what is man who emerged was a living being and, for all his eccentricity, lovable. Having known him well myself and having worked with him helped me, and I tried to draw a true picture of him. I was just finishing it when what is first rumblings of an international storm were heard. Berlin was threatening Prague. what is French government mobilized several classes. We returned to Paris and went straight to what is Figaro to see Lucien Romier whose intelligence I trusted. `I don't think there will be war,' he told us. I had confidence in his judgment and was not surprised when Neville Chamberlain flew first to Berchtesgaden, then to Godesberg, and when Munich established a precarious peace. what is truth was that we were not ready and England even less than we. This was what is opinion of my friend Eric Phipps, British Ambassador to Paris. For a long time I had been acquainted with Sir Eric and Lady Phipps. I had met them after what is war where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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