Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 219

THE CAPITOL

is not true of me. To pay calls on thirty-nine men who are all, or almost all, very remarkable, some as writers, others as generals, prelates, admirals, scientists, ambassadors, is far from boring. Quite the contrary. Those who intend to vote for you say so, which immediately makes the visit happy and intimate; those who are against you have recourse to various tactics which are amusing to observe and which vary from brutal frankness to complete abstention. If a general talks to you for an hour about Frederick II or an archaeologist about cathedrals, you know that their votes have been promised elsewhere, but you have heard two brilliant lectures delivered to you alone by two eminent authorities. That's not time wasted.
My shortest visit was the one I paid to Marshal Franchet d'Esperey. I knew him and relished his military brusqueness.
`I know what brings you here,' he said. `You want to belong to the French Academy ... That's perfectly reasonable ... Only I've made out a table of promotion ... You are Number Two ... Number One is Jerome Tliaraud ... And so if Tharaud presents himself against you I shall vote for him ... If he does not prcsent himself I shall vote for you ... Au revoir, my friend.'
Tharaud did not present himself against me; my competitor was Paul Hazard, whose courtesy and perfect honesty guaranteed a chivalrous combat. We emerged from it closer to each other than ever. We had many friends in common so that certain men - such as Admiral Lacaze, Joseph Bedier, Louis Madelin - who would have voted for me against anyone else very loyally told me that they would begin by voting for Hazard. And so I did not count them in the score I was keeping, but even without them it seemed to me that I should have a majority ill my favour.
`Don't have any illusions,' old experts like Abel Hermant told me, `we've seen candidates whose reckoning gave them twenty-seven votes, unconditional promises, and who at the time of balloting received three.'
Hermant had had a great deal of experience in campaigns for the Academy, having had to present himself six times before being elected, a fact which he used to recount with much humour. Although well advanced in years he retained his youthfulness of spirit.
`The Institute preserves you,' he would say. `So many candidates are hoping for your death that you go on living to spite them.'
When he was forced to undergo a painful and dangerous operation he

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE is not true of me. To pay calls on thirty-nine men who are all, or almost all, very remarkable, some as writers, others as generals, prelates, admirals, scientists, ambassadors, is far from boring. Quite what is contrary. Those who intend to vote for you say so, which immediately makes what is what is happy and intimate; those who are against you have recourse to various tactics which are amusing to observe and which vary from brutal frankness to complete abstention. If a general talks to you for an hour about Frederick II or an archaeologist about cathedrals, you know that their votes have been promised elsewhere, but you have heard two brilliant lectures delivered to you alone by two eminent authorities. That's not time wasted. My shortest what is was what is one I paid to Marshal Franchet d'Esperey. I knew him and relished his military brusqueness. `I know what brings you here,' he said. `You want to belong to what is French Academy ... That's perfectly reasonable ... Only I've made out a table of promotion ... You are Number Two ... Number One is Jerome Tliaraud ... And so if Tharaud presents himself against you I shall vote for him ... If he does not prcsent himself I shall vote for you ... Au revoir, my friend.' Tharaud did not present himself against me; my competitor was Paul Hazard, whose courtesy and perfect honesty guaranteed a chivalrous combat. We emerged from it closer to each other than ever. We had many friends in common so that certain men - such as Admiral Lacaze, Joseph Bedier, Louis Madelin - who would have voted for me against anyone else very loyally told me that they would begin by voting for Hazard. And so I did not count them in what is score I was keeping, but even without them it seemed to me that I should have a majority ill my favour. `Don't have any illusions,' old experts like Abel Hermant told me, `we've seen candidates whose reckoning gave them twenty-seven votes, unconditional promises, and who at what is time of balloting received three.' Hermant had had a great deal of experience in campaigns for what is Academy, having had to present himself six times before being elected, a fact which he used to recount with much humour. Although well advanced in years he retained his youthfulness of spirit. `The Institute preserves you,' he would say. `So many candidates are hoping for your what time is it that you go on living to spite them.' When he was forced to undergo a painful and dangerous operation he where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 219 where is p align="center" where is strong THE CAPITOL where is p align="justify" is not true of me. To pay calls on thirty-nine men who are all, or almost all, very remarkable, some as writers, others as generals, prelates, admirals, scientists, ambassadors, is far from boring. Quite what is contrary. Those who intend to vote for you say so, which immediately makes what is what is happy and intimate; those who are against you have recourse to various tactics which are amusing to observe and which vary from brutal frankness to complete abstention. If a general talks to you for an hour about Frederick II or an archaeologist about cathedrals, you know that their votes have been promised elsewhere, but you have heard two brilliant lectures delivered to you alone by two eminent authorities. That's not time wasted. My shortest what is was what is one I paid to Marshal Franchet d'Esperey. I knew him and relished his military brusqueness. `I know what brings you here,' he said. `You want to belong to what is French Academy ... That's perfectly reasonable ... Only I've made out a table of promotion ... You are Number Two ... Number One is Jerome Tliaraud ... And so if Tharaud presents himself against you I shall vote for him ... If he does not prcsent himself I shall vote for you ... Au revoir, my friend.' Tharaud did not present himself against me; my competitor was Paul Hazard, whose courtesy and perfect honesty guaranteed a chivalrous combat. We emerged from it closer to each other than ever. We had many friends in common so that certain men - such as Admiral Lacaze, Joseph Bedier, Louis Madelin - who would have voted for me against anyone else very loyally told me that they would begin by voting for Hazard. And so I did not count them in what is score I was keeping, but even without them it seemed to me that I should have a majority ill my favour. `Don't have any illusions,' old experts like Abel Hermant told me, `we've seen candidates whose reckoning gave them twenty-seven votes, unconditional promises, and who at what is time of balloting received three.' Hermant had had a great deal of experience in campaigns for the Academy, having had to present himself six times before being elected, a fact which he used to recount with much humour. Although well advanced in years he retained his youthfulness of spirit. `The Institute preserves you,' he would say. `So many candidates are hoping for your what time is it that you go on living to spite them.' When he was forced to undergo a painful and dangerous operation he where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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