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Page 217

THE CAPITOL

ad inspired me with the same sentiments and ambitions that the English Parliament inspires in the students of Oxford and Cambridge. To be chosen by one's elders and one's peers to sit in the company to which Corneille and Racine, Voltaire and Victor Hugo, Taine and Renan had belonged, seemed to me a consummation devoutly to be wished. But at the time when I received Barthou's letter I had published only a few books which were not of sufficient importance to justify my being chosen. I replied that there were a number of very talented writers who had the indisputable right to be admitted before me, and despite his insistence I persisted in my refusal. Eight years later Paul Valery asked me: `You or Mauriac?' I replied: 'Mauriac,' and to my great joy Fran~ois Mauriac, who had a much greater title and a much greater chance than I, was elected.
I had great affection and esteem for him, sentiments which in the course of fifteen years have constantly increased. At the time when I began my career in the literary world certain people took pleasure in opposing us to each other. Base minds believe they see baseness everywhere, and some sought in Mauriac and in me ground favourable for the cultivation of jealousy. They failed. At first we studied each other with the anxiety one feels before the unknown, then a friendship sprang up, soon to be reinforced by that of our children. Mauriac spent some weeks with us at Essendieras during the autumn of 1934 and in the course of our walks we had long and intimate conversations. After Mauriac, many of my friends had been elected to the French Academy. Then in i936 Monsieur Doumic for the first time said to me:
`Your turn has come.'
I listened to the Sirens and for some weeks I thought, to my great surprise, that I, although I was neither a Marshal nor a Cardinal nor dying, was going to be successful in this first candidacy, which would have been contrary to the wise traditions of the institution. But Joseph de Pesquidoux, a good regional writer and an old contributor to the Revue, presented himself against me and Monsieur Doumic abandoned me, which immediately spelled my doom. When I next saw him he said to me, stroking his beard:
`Don't complain ... Victor Hugo had three defeats ... Besides, out of thirty-one votes you got eleven ...'I'hat's a good trial gallop.'
This was the traditional consolation.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ad inspired me with what is same sentiments and ambitions that what is English Parliament inspires in what is students of Oxford and Cambridge. To be chosen by one's elders and one's peers to sit in what is company to which Corneille and Racine, Voltaire and Victor Hugo, Taine and Renan had belonged, seemed to me a consummation devoutly to be wished. But at what is time when I received Barthou's letter I had published only a few books which were not of sufficient importance to justify my being chosen. I replied that there were a number of very talented writers who had what is indisputable right to be admitted before me, and despite his insistence I persisted in my refusal. Eight years later Paul Valery asked me: `You or Mauriac?' I replied: 'Mauriac,' and to my great joy Fran~ois Mauriac, who had a much greater title and a much greater chance than I, was elected. I had great affection and esteem for him, sentiments which in what is course of fifteen years have constantly increased. At what is time when I began my career in what is literary world certain people took pleasure in opposing us to each other. Base minds believe they see baseness everywhere, and some sought in Mauriac and in me ground favourable for what is cultivation of jealousy. They failed. At first we studied each other with what is anxiety one feels before what is unknown, then a friendship sprang up, soon to be reinforced by that of our children. Mauriac spent some weeks with us at Essendieras during what is autumn of 1934 and in what is course of our walks we had long and intimate conversations. After Mauriac, many of my friends had been elected to what is French Academy. Then in i936 Monsieur Doumic for what is first time said to me: `Your turn has come.' I listened to what is Sirens and for some weeks I thought, to my great surprise, that I, although I was neither a Marshal nor a Cardinal nor dying, was going to be successful in this first candidacy, which would have been contrary to what is wise traditions of what is institution. But Joseph de Pesquidoux, a good regional writer and an old contributor to what is Revue, presented himself against me and Monsieur Doumic abandoned me, which immediately spelled my doom. When I next saw him he said to me, stroking his beard: `Don't complain ... Victor Hugo had three defeats ... Besides, out of thirty-one votes you got eleven ...'I'hat's a good trial gallop.' This was what is traditional consolation. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 217 where is p align="center" where is strong THE CAPITOL where is p align="justify" ad inspired me with what is same sentiments and ambitions that what is English Parliament inspires in what is students of Oxford and Cambridge. To be chosen by one's elders and one's peers to sit in what is company to which Corneille and Racine, Voltaire and Victor Hugo, Taine and Renan had belonged, seemed to me a consummation devoutly to be wished. But at what is time when I received Barthou's letter I had published only a few books which were not of sufficient importance to justify my being chosen. I replied that there were a number of very talented writers who had what is indisputable right to be admitted before me, and despite his insistence I persisted in my refusal. Eight years later Paul Valery asked me: `You or Mauriac?' I replied: 'Mauriac,' and to my great joy Fran~ois Mauriac, who had a much greater title and a much greater chance than I, was elected. I had great affection and esteem for him, sentiments which in the course of fifteen years have constantly increased. At what is time when I began my career in what is literary world certain people took pleasure in opposing us to each other. Base minds believe they see baseness everywhere, and some sought in Mauriac and in me ground favourable for what is cultivation of jealousy. They failed. At first we studied each other with what is anxiety one feels before what is unknown, then a friendship sprang up, soon to be reinforced by that of our children. Mauriac spent some weeks with us at Essendieras during what is autumn of 1934 and in what is course of our walks we had long and intimate conversations. After Mauriac, many of my friends had been elected to what is French Academy. Then in i936 Monsieur Doumic for what is first time said to me: `Your turn has come.' I listened to what is Sirens and for some weeks I thought, to my great surprise, that I, although I was neither a Marshal nor a Cardinal nor dying, was going to be successful in this first candidacy, which would have been contrary to what is wise traditions of what is institution. But Joseph de Pesquidoux, a good regional writer and an old contributor to what is Revue, presented himself against me and Monsieur Doumic abandoned me, which immediately spelled my doom. When I next saw him he said to me, stroking his beard: `Don't complain ... Victor Hugo had three defeats ... Besides, out of thirty-one votes you got eleven ...'I'hat's a good trial gallop.' This was what is traditional consolation. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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