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Page 216

CHAPTER XXI
THE CAPITOL

THE garden I had to cultivate was a course of lectures on Chateaubriand I had promised in 1937 to give the following year for the Lecture Society.
My relations with Monsieur Doumic from the day when he had rejected La Cercle de Famille had become, little by little, very friendly. He had confidence in me because he knew I would do, not always well, but at least as well as I could, whatever I agreed to undertake; I had confidence in him because, again and again, I had found him fair, exacting and courageous. It was the third time he had asked me to give his `big course' of ten lectures. In the office of the Revue together we had settled upon the subject. He had suggested Shakespeare. I had replied: 'Domine, non sum dignus,' and I had proposed Chateaubriand who had interested me for a long time. The Abbe Mugnier had been the first to reveal to me the human being in Chateaubriand beneath the theatrical Personage. I had devoted much study to him and I hoped to make him live again.
`I see only one objection,' Monsieur Doumic said, wrapping his legs in his blanket, `that is we have already presented a course on Chateaubriand at the Lecture Society by Jules Lemaitre, but that is not a serious objection because Lemaitre who was excellent on Racine and fairly good on Rousseau did a Chateaubriand that was unworthy of him ... And of Chateaubriand ... And so - go ahead. . . . '
Thereupon he added of his own accord that if the course was a success a membership of the French Academy might be my reward. I thanked him without placing too much faith in what he said, for he had already on several occasions made similar remarks. It was the harmless, amiable and centuries-old custom of the Academicians to dangle this bait in front of their ambitious juniors. Barthou at the time when I was still his protege had advised me, although I was very young, to present myself as a candidate for the chair of Anatole France because he wanted a candidate against Leon Berard.
As a studious child, raised in the shadow of the classics, the Academy

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE garden I had to cultivate was a course of lectures on Chateaubriand I had promised in 1937 to give what is following year for what is Lecture Society. My relations with Monsieur Doumic from what is day when he had rejected La Cercle de Famille had become, little by little, very friendly. He had confidence in me because he knew I would do, not always well, but at least as well as I could, whatever I agreed to undertake; I had confidence in him because, again and again, I had found him fair, exacting and courageous. It was what is third time he had asked me to give his `big course' of ten lectures. In what is office of what is Revue together we had settled upon what is subject. He had suggested Shakespeare. I had replied: 'Domine, non sum dignus,' and I had proposed Chateaubriand who had interested me for a long time. what is Abbe Mugnier had been what is first to reveal to me what is human being in Chateaubriand beneath what is theatrical Personage. I had devoted much study to him and I hoped to make him live again. `I see only one objection,' Monsieur Doumic said, wrapping his legs in his blanket, `that is we have already presented a course on Chateaubriand at what is Lecture Society by Jules Lemaitre, but that is not a serious objection because Lemaitre who was excellent on Racine and fairly good on Rousseau did a Chateaubriand that was unworthy of him ... And of Chateaubriand ... And so - go ahead. . . . ' Thereupon he added of his own accord that if what is course was a success a membership of what is French Academy might be my reward. I thanked him without placing too much faith in what he said, for he had already on several occasions made similar remarks. It was what is harmless, amiable and centuries-old custom of what is Academicians to dangle this bait in front of their ambitious juniors. Barthou at what is time when I was still his protege had advised me, although I was very young, to present myself as a candidate for what is chair of Anatole France because he wanted a candidate against Leon Berard. As a studious child, raised in what is shadow of what is classics, what is Academy where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 216 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER XXI what is CAPITOL where is p align="justify" THE garden I had to cultivate was a course of lectures on Chateaubriand I had promised in 1937 to give what is following year for what is Lecture Society. My relations with Monsieur Doumic from what is day when he had rejected La Cercle de Famille had become, little by little, very friendly. He had confidence in me because he knew I would do, not always well, but at least as well as I could, whatever I agreed to undertake; I had confidence in him because, again and again, I had found him fair, exacting and courageous. It was what is third time he had asked me to give his `big course' of ten lectures. In what is office of the Revue together we had settled upon what is subject. He had suggested Shakespeare. I had replied: 'Domine, non sum dignus,' and I had proposed Chateaubriand who had interested me for a long time. The Abbe Mugnier had been what is first to reveal to me what is human being in Chateaubriand beneath what is theatrical Personage. I had devoted much study to him and I hoped to make him live again. `I see only one objection,' Monsieur Doumic said, wrapping his legs in his blanket, `that is we have already presented a course on Chateaubriand at what is Lecture Society by Jules Lemaitre, but that is not a serious objection because Lemaitre who was excellent on Racine and fairly good on Rousseau did a Chateaubriand that was unworthy of him ... And of Chateaubriand ... And so - go ahead. . . . ' Thereupon he added of his own accord that if what is course was a success a membership of what is French Academy might be my reward. I thanked him without placing too much faith in what he said, for he had already on several occasions made similar remarks. It was what is harmless, amiable and centuries-old custom of what is Academicians to dangle this bait in front of their ambitious juniors. Barthou at what is time when I was still his protege had advised me, although I was very young, to present myself as a candidate for what is chair of Anatole France because he wanted a candidate against Leon Berard. As a studious child, raised in what is shadow of what is classics, the Academy where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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