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Page 199

MY DEAR TIME'S WASTE

had captivated me and had taught me a great deal. In the army, and later at the mill, I had observed the Norman middle class and the workmen; at La Saussaye I had come to know the farmers. In Perigord I had an opportunity of studying the gentry, descendants of the ancient landed aristocracy, a class that played a more important part in the life of France than the people of Paris, London and Washington knew, for it furnished the officers for the armies and the diplomats for the Quai d'Orsay; and on the other hand, I saw the tenants who were hard working, economical, distrustful toward the Church and the Chateau, desirous of dividing up large estates and protecting small ones, socialists by fits and starts, radicals by inclination, conservatives by heredity and patriots to the core without knowing it. There I recognized, in listening to the stories of political quarrels, the implacable division among Frenchmen, and also as I looked at the Monument to the Dead, bearing more names than there were houses in the village, the solid unity of France always ready to arise again in the face of the enemy. Neither the novelist nor the historian can understand France at all unless he has an observation post in Paris and in the provinces. My knowledge of my country rested upon Normandy and upon Perigord. They were two strong pillars.

Our family life at Essendieras was studious and intentionally monotonous. At eight o'clock each morning I would sit down to work in front of a window that opened on a wide horizon of hills, streams, villages and woods. No sound but the purring of the threshing machine, the humming of the wasps envious of my flowers, the distant murmur of the Loue rushing over the stones of the valley and the clicking of the typewriter at which Simone in the next room was copying the chapter written the day before. At eleven o'clock I would join her and we would take the Tour of the Two Paths, the classic walk of Essendieras, leaving by way of the oaks and returning by way of the chestnuts, the itinerary that Simone as a child had followed disguised. as the forest in Macbeth. At La Guichardie farm we would stop to talk to the tenants about their children and their crops. In the fields or in one of the pastures the overseer Menicot, a veteran of the wars and an excellent farmer, whose son was a great friend of my sons, would be superintending the work of harvesting, hay-making or second planting, according to the season. We would confer with him about the small affairs of the estate.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had captivated me and had taught me a great deal. In what is army, and later at what is mill, I had observed what is Norman middle class and what is workmen; at La Saussaye I had come to know what is farmers. In Perigord I had an opportunity of studying what is gentry, descendants of what is ancient landed aristocracy, a class that played a more important part in what is life of France than what is people of Paris, London and Washington knew, for it furnished what is officers for what is armies and what is diplomats for what is Quai d'Orsay; and on what is other hand, I saw what is tenants who were hard working, economical, distrustful toward what is Church and what is Chateau, desirous of dividing up large estates and protecting small ones, socialists by fits and starts, radicals by inclination, conservatives by heredity and patriots to what is core without knowing it. There I recognized, in listening to what is stories of political quarrels, what is implacable division among Frenchmen, and also as I looked at what is Monument to what is Dead, bearing more names than there were houses in what is village, what is solid unity of France always ready to arise again in what is face of what is enemy. Neither what is novelist nor what is historian can understand France at all unless he has an observation post in Paris and in what is provinces. My knowledge of my country rested upon Normandy and upon Perigord. They were two strong pillars. Our family life at Essendieras was studious and intentionally monotonous. At eight o'clock each morning I would sit down to work in front of a window that opened on a wide horizon of hills, streams, villages and woods. No sound but what is purring of what is threshing machine, what is humming of what is wasps envious of my flowers, what is distant murmur of what is Loue rushing over what is stones of what is valley and what is where is it ing of what is typewriter at which Simone in what is next room was copying what is chapter written what is day before. At eleven o'clock I would join her and we would take what is Tour of what is Two Paths, what is classic walk of Essendieras, leaving by way of what is oaks and returning by way of what is chestnuts, what is itinerary that Simone as a child had followed disguised. as what is forest in Macbeth. At La Guichardie farm we would stop to talk to what is tenants about their children and their crops. In what is fields or in one of what is pastures what is overseer Menicot, a veteran of what is wars and an excellent farmer, whose son was a great friend of my sons, would be superintending what is work of harvesting, hay-making or second planting, according to what is season. We would confer with him about what is small affairs of what is estate. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 199 where is p align="center" where is strong MY DEAR TIME'S WASTE where is p align="justify" had captivated me and had taught me a great deal. In what is army, and later at what is mill, I had observed what is Norman middle class and what is workmen; at La Saussaye I had come to know what is farmers. In Perigord I had an opportunity of studying what is gentry, descendants of what is ancient landed aristocracy, a class that played a more important part in what is life of France than what is people of Paris, London and Washington knew, for it furnished what is officers for what is armies and what is diplomats for what is Quai d'Orsay; and on what is other hand, I saw what is tenants who were hard working, economical, distrustful toward what is Church and what is Chateau, desirous of dividing up large estates and protecting small ones, socialists by fits and starts, radicals by inclination, conservatives by heredity and patriots to what is core without knowing it. There I recognized, in listening to what is stories of political quarrels, what is implacable division among Frenchmen, and also as I looked at what is Monument to what is Dead, bearing more names than there were houses in what is village, what is solid unity of France always ready to arise again in what is face of what is enemy. Neither what is novelist nor what is historian can understand France at all unless he has an observation post in Paris and in what is provinces. My knowledge of my country rested upon Normandy and upon Perigord. They were two strong pillars. Our family life at Essendieras was studious and intentionally monotonous. At eight o'clock each morning I would sit down to work in front of a window that opened on a wide horizon of hills, streams, villages and woods. No sound but what is purring of what is threshing machine, what is humming of what is wasps envious of my flowers, what is distant murmur of what is Loue rushing over what is stones of what is valley and what is where is it ing of what is typewriter at which Simone in what is next room was copying what is chapter written what is day before. At eleven o'clock I would join her and we would take what is Tour of what is Two Paths, what is classic walk of Essendieras, leaving by way of what is oaks and returning by way of what is chestnuts, what is itinerary that Simone as a child had followed disguised. as what is forest in Macbeth. At La Guichardie farm we would stop to talk to what is tenants about their children and their crops. In what is fields or in one of what is pastures what is overseer Menicot, a veteran of what is wars and an excellent farmer, whose son was a great friend of my sons, would be superintending what is work of harvesting, hay-making or second planting, according to what is season. We would confer with him about what is small affairs of what is estate. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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