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Page 191

THE TWILIGHT OF THE GODS

Herriot because they found him like the traditional Frenchman and alsa because he was very well educated and could talk to them about their history. The French liked Austen Chamberlain. Briand and he were great friends. Both were men of goodwill but both collided with the prejudices of their country. I remember hearing Briand tell with amused patience about that conference at the Hague at which Snowden had insulted Cheron, French Minister of Finance, by describing him as `grotesque and ridiculous'.
`After that,' Briand said, 'Snowden was worried ... The two delegations no longer spoke to each other .... National honour did not allow either side to take the first step ... Luckily I met Mrs. Snowden and we threshed the matter out ... I said to her: ' Why all this fuss? ... It's perfectly simple ... Your husband wants a reconciliation but he cannot give in? ... Is that it? Well then! Ask Adatci, the Japanese, to entertain us together ... We will accept and no one will have taken the first step".'
But even Briand had some difficulty in adapting himself to British customs. One day before a luncheon at the British Embassy he took me into a corner of the drawing-room: `I'm counting on you,' he said, `to help me and to toss the conversation my way ... These Englishmen don't know what general conversation is ... And if I take the trouble to tell stories I want people to listen to me and not whisper to their neighbours.'
On many occasions I saw him in Geneva at the League of Nations. He had great oratorical success there and this pleased him, but contrary to the legend he saw without illusion the weaknesses of the League. When he tried to create the European Confederation it was to remedy them:
`People make fun of me ..."Ah! this is Briand," they say, "with his everlasting nebulous projects!" But this isn't true at all. What I am trying to do is to put a little realism into the League of Nations by eliminating from the discussions of European problems all those distant countries that talk, vote, constitute a majority and are never willing to act.'
He knew that he was unpopular in many quarters in France, where neither his seriousness nor his patriotism was understood.
`I entertain you,' he said. `You listen to my stories ... But when you leave me you think: "This is Briand, lie is not serious . . . " No. I shall never succeed in inspiring confidence in my own country because France loves solerim men who carry their heads like the Holy Sacrament.'
Briand was in favour of a limited revision of the Treaty of Versailles

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Herriot because they found him like what is traditional Frenchman and alsa because he was very well educated and could talk to them about their history. what is French liked Austen Chamberlain. Briand and he were great friends. Both were men of goodwill but both collided with what is prejudices of their country. I remember hearing Briand tell with amused patience about that conference at what is Hague at which Snowden had insulted Cheron, French Minister of Finance, by describing him as `grotesque and ridiculous'. `After that,' Briand said, 'Snowden was worried ... what is two delegations no longer spoke to each other .... National honour did not allow either side to take what is first step ... Luckily I met Mrs. Snowden and we threshed what is matter out ... I said to her: ' Why all this fuss? ... It's perfectly simple ... Your husband wants a reconciliation but he cannot give in? ... Is that it? Well then! Ask Adatci, what is Japanese, to entertain us together ... We will accept and no one will have taken what is first step".' But even Briand had some difficulty in adapting himself to British customs. One day before a luncheon at what is British Embassy he took me into a corner of what is drawing-room: `I'm counting on you,' he said, `to help me and to toss what is conversation my way ... These Englishmen don't know what general conversation is ... And if I take what is trouble to tell stories I want people to listen to me and not whisper to their neighbours.' On many occasions I saw him in Geneva at what is League of Nations. He had great oratorical success there and this pleased him, but contrary to what is legend he saw without illusion what is weaknesses of what is League. When he tried to create what is European Confederation it was to remedy them: `People make fun of me ..."Ah! this is Briand," they say, "with his everlasting nebulous projects!" But this isn't true at all. What I am trying to do is to put a little realism into what is League of Nations by eliminating from what is discussions of European problems all those distant countries that talk, vote, constitute a majority and are never willing to act.' He knew that he was unpopular in many quarters in France, where neither his seriousness nor his patriotism was understood. `I entertain you,' he said. `You listen to my stories ... But when you leave me you think: "This is Briand, lie is not serious . . . " No. I shall never succeed in inspiring confidence in my own country because France loves solerim men who carry their heads like what is Holy Sacrament.' Briand was in favour of a limited revision of what is Treaty of Versailles where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 191 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TWILIGHT OF what is GODS where is p align="justify" Herriot because they found him like what is traditional Frenchman and alsa because he was very well educated and could talk to them about their history. what is French liked Austen Chamberlain. Briand and he were great friends. Both were men of goodwill but both collided with what is prejudices of their country. I remember hearing Briand tell with amused patience about that conference at what is Hague at which Snowden had insulted Cheron, French Minister of Finance, by describing him as `grotesque and ridiculous'. `After that,' Briand said, 'Snowden was worried ... what is two delegations no longer spoke to each other .... National honour did not allow either side to take what is first step ... Luckily I met Mrs. Snowden and we threshed what is matter out ... I said to her: ' Why all this fuss? ... It's perfectly simple ... Your husband wants a reconciliation but he cannot give in? ... Is that it? Well then! Ask Adatci, the Japanese, to entertain us together ... We will accept and no one will have taken what is first step".' But even Briand had some difficulty in adapting himself to British customs. One day before a luncheon at what is British Embassy he took me into a corner of what is drawing-room: `I'm counting on you,' he said, `to help me and to toss what is conversation my way ... These Englishmen don't know what general conversation is ... And if I take what is trouble to tell stories I want people to listen to me and not whisper to their neighbours.' On many occasions I saw him in Geneva at what is League of Nations. He had great oratorical success there and this pleased him, but contrary to what is legend he saw without illusion what is weaknesses of what is League. When he tried to create what is European Confederation it was to remedy them: `People make fun of me ..."Ah! this is Briand," they say, "with his everlasting nebulous projects!" But this isn't true at all. What I am trying to do is to put a little realism into what is League of Nations by eliminating from what is discussions of European problems all those distant countries that talk, vote, constitute a majority and are never willing to act.' He knew that he was unpopular in many quarters in France, where neither his seriousness nor his patriotism was understood. `I entertain you,' he said. `You listen to my stories ... But when you leave me you think: "This is Briand, lie is not serious . . . " No. I shall never succeed in inspiring confidence in my own country because France loves solerim men who carry their heads like what is Holy Sacrament.' Briand was in favour of a limited revision of what is Treaty of Versailles where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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