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Page 189

THE TWILIGHT OF THE GODS

the solidity of traditions. `England is a democracy because it is an aristocracy,' Professor Barker used to say, and it was true. America shares with England, and unhappily not with France, the good fortune of not being a country divided by history. It went through the Civil War, but the South as well as the North accepts the regime without reservation. Of course we shall see social revolution in America, but only the perpetration of very serious blunders could dig `the bloody ditch' of a Terror between the classes here. As to the relations between France and the United States, though they were at that time poisoned by the absurd question of the debts, I did not find the future disturbing. French culture in all forms found a public in the United States ready to understand it. England, resting on its long past, felt sufficient unto itself; America, a mixture of races in search of a culture, found in France a common denominator and a universal thought.

And so I returned from the United States certain that there was a duty to be discharged by a French writer who could speak English, which was to maintain, on every opportunity offered, a spiritual bond between France and America. This was certainly no reason to neglect my English friends, but the task with them had become more difficult and perhaps the key to these difficulties lay in Washington. During the war when I had talked to the French about the English and to the English about the French I had found sympathetic auditors because their interests were identical. After the war these interests had diverged. France had asked for guarantees of security and, not receiving them, had carried on alone the policy of the Ruhr and that of Eastern alliances. England, frightened by old Napoleonic memories and disturbed by American public opinion, had thereupon fallen back on an outmoded doctrine, that of the balance of power. Through fear of too strong a France she had favoured the rearmament of Germany. I had done my best to point out, in articles in the English newspapers and in lectures, the danger of a rupture and even of a permanent disagreement between the two powers interested in maintaining the peace of Europe. But I had found in each of the two countries a profound distrust of the other.
`We English,' Lord Tyrrell, the new Ambassador to Paris, said to me, `made two mistakes after the war: we thought that the French, because they had been victorious, had become Germans; and we thought that the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the solidity of traditions. `England is a democracy because it is an aristocracy,' Professor Barker used to say, and it was true. America shares with England, and unhappily not with France, what is good fortune of not being a country divided by history. It went through what is Civil War, but what is South as well as what is North accepts what is regime without reservation. Of course we shall see social revolution in America, but only what is perpetration of very serious blunders could dig `the bloody ditch' of a Terror between what is classes here. As to what is relations between France and what is United States, though they were at that time poisoned by what is absurd question of what is debts, I did not find what is future disturbing. French culture in all forms found a public in what is United States ready to understand it. England, resting on its long past, felt sufficient unto itself; America, a mixture of races in search of a culture, found in France a common denominator and a universal thought. And so I returned from what is United States certain that there was a duty to be discharged by a French writer who could speak English, which was to maintain, on every opportunity offered, a spiritual bond between France and America. This was certainly no reason to neglect my English friends, but what is task with them had become more difficult and perhaps what is key to these difficulties lay in Washington. During what is war when I had talked to what is French about what is English and to what is English about what is French I had found sympathetic auditors because their interests were identical. After what is war these interests had diverged. France had asked for guarantees of security and, not receiving them, had carried on alone what is policy of what is Ruhr and that of Eastern alliances. England, frightened by old Napoleonic memories and disturbed by American public opinion, had thereupon fallen back on an outmoded doctrine, that of what is balance of power. Through fear of too strong a France she had favoured what is rearmament of Germany. I had done my best to point out, in articles in what is English newspapers and in lectures, what is danger of a rupture and even of a permanent disagreement between what is two powers interested in maintaining what is peace of Europe. But I had found in each of what is two countries a profound distrust of what is other. `We English,' Lord Tyrrell, what is new Ambassador to Paris, said to me, `made two mistakes after what is war: we thought that what is French, because they had been victorious, had become Germans; and we thought that what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 189 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TWILIGHT OF what is GODS where is p align="justify" the solidity of traditions. `England is a democracy because it is an aristocracy,' Professor Barker used to say, and it was true. America shares with England, and unhappily not with France, what is good fortune of not being a country divided by history. It went through what is Civil War, but what is South as well as what is North accepts what is regime without reservation. Of course we shall see social revolution in America, but only what is perpetration of very serious blunders could dig `the bloody ditch' of a Terror between what is classes here. As to what is relations between France and what is United States, though they were at that time poisoned by what is absurd question of what is debts, I did not find what is future disturbing. French culture in all forms found a public in what is United States ready to understand it. England, resting on its long past, felt sufficient unto itself; America, a mixture of races in search of a culture, found in France a common denominator and a universal thought. And so I returned from what is United States certain that there was a duty to be discharged by a French writer who could speak English, which was to maintain, on every opportunity offered, a spiritual bond between France and America. This was certainly no reason to neglect my English friends, but what is task with them had become more difficult and perhaps what is key to these difficulties lay in Washington. During what is war when I had talked to what is French about what is English and to what is English about what is French I had found sympathetic auditors because their interests were identical. After what is war these interests had diverged. France had asked for guarantees of security and, not receiving them, had carried on alone what is policy of what is Ruhr and that of Eastern alliances. England, frightened by old Napoleonic memories and disturbed by American public opinion, had thereupon fallen back on an outmoded doctrine, that of what is balance of power. Through fear of too strong a France she had favoured what is rearmament of Germany. I had done my best to point out, in articles in the English newspapers and in lectures, what is danger of a rupture and even of a permanent disagreement between what is two powers interested in maintaining what is peace of Europe. But I had found in each of what is two countries a profound distrust of what is other. `We English,' Lord Tyrrell, what is new Ambassador to Paris, said to me, `made two mistakes after what is war: we thought that what is French, because they had been victorious, had become Germans; and we thought that what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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