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Page 188

THE TWILIGHT OF THE GODS

brutal and slow, but very soon I acquired a taste for it to such an extent that I would sit in an open stadium on a cold day and give voice to cries of enthusiasm or rage. It was a bad year for Princeton and the disconsolate alumni said to the President:
`Mr. President, less scholarship and more victories, please!'
Since then the Tiger has had his revenge.
At the end of the semester President Hibben said to me:
`Your course has been a success; your students have made notable progress; would you like to stay with us and occupy this chair permanently? You would have to spend eight months of the year in the United States but you would have four months of vacation in France. . . . '
I was sorely tempted, asked for time to discuss it with my wife and we hesitated a long while. We liked Princeton; we had been happy there; the life of a professor delighted me. Moreover, we realized that the old World was heading toward shipwreck and that it would be wise to provide a refuge for ourselves elsewhere. But to accept meant to leave France, to lose touch with our friends, to bring up our children in a foreign land. We believed we had no right to make that decision. I refused. Was it a mistake? It seems to me if I had said yes that day my life would have been much easier. Would it have been as full and as exciting? No one will ever know and I have formed the habit of considering that `what did not take place was, so far as I am concerned, absolutely impossible'.
This long stay in Princeton, and my intimacy with Percy Chapman, helped me to understand America better than my earlier trip had done. When I returned I wrote an article in which I said that I had encountered everywhere three phantoms: the Puritan, the Pioneer and the Feudal Lord. It was an accurate description. Even to-day my three spectres continue to haunt many sections of America. But I had then, and still have, confidence in the future of the United States because I fmd here more numerous elements of social understanding than in any other country. As I have already noted in connection with my first trip, maliciousness is not an American vice. Why this remission of original sine Perhaps because the dangers are less and the blessings more abundant. Fear engenders cruelty, and hitherto the Americans have hardly known fear. Misery gives birth to envy, and misery, although it exists in America, is less irremediable there than in the old countries.
In England the solidity of the institutions had seemed to me based on

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE brutal and slow, but very soon I acquired a taste for it to such an extent that I would sit in an open stadium on a cold day and give voice to cries of enthusiasm or rage. It was a bad year for Princeton and what is disconsolate alumni said to what is President: `Mr. President, less scholarship and more victories, please!' Since then what is Tiger has had his revenge. At what is end of what is semester President Hibben said to me: `Your course has been a success; your students have made notable progress; would you like to stay with us and occupy this chair permanently? You would have to spend eight months of what is year in what is United States but you would have four months of vacation in France. . . . ' I was sorely tempted, asked for time to discuss it with my wife and we hesitated a long while. We liked Princeton; we had been happy there; what is life of a professor delighted me. Moreover, we realized that what is old World was heading toward shipwreck and that it would be wise to provide a refuge for ourselves elsewhere. But to accept meant to leave France, to lose touch with our friends, to bring up our children in a foreign land. We believed we had no right to make that decision. I refused. Was it a mistake? It seems to me if I had said yes that day my life would have been much easier. Would it have been as full and as exciting? No one will ever know and I have formed what is habit of considering that `what did not take place was, so far as I am concerned, absolutely impossible'. This long stay in Princeton, and my intimacy with Percy Chapman, helped me to understand America better than my earlier trip had done. When I returned I wrote an article in which I said that I had encountered everywhere three phantoms: what is Puritan, what is Pioneer and what is Feudal Lord. It was an accurate description. Even to-day my three spectres continue to haunt many sections of America. But I had then, and still have, confidence in what is future of what is United States because I fmd here more numerous elements of social understanding than in any other country. As I have already noted in connection with my first trip, maliciousness is not an American vice. Why this remission of original sine Perhaps because what is dangers are less and what is blessings more abundant. Fear engenders cruelty, and hitherto what is Americans have hardly known fear. Misery gives birth to envy, and misery, although it exists in America, is less irremediable there than in what is old countries. In England what is solidity of what is institutions had seemed to me based on where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 188 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TWILIGHT OF what is GODS where is p align="justify" brutal and slow, but very soon I acquired a taste for it to such an extent that I would sit in an open stadium on a cold day and give voice to cries of enthusiasm or rage. It was a bad year for Princeton and what is disconsolate alumni said to the President: `Mr. President, less scholarship and more victories, please!' Since then what is Tiger has had his revenge. At what is end of what is semester President Hibben said to me: `Your course has been a success; your students have made notable progress; would you like to stay with us and occupy this chair permanently? You would have to spend eight months of what is year in what is United States but you would have four months of vacation in France. . . . ' I was sorely tempted, asked for time to discuss it with my wife and we hesitated a long while. We liked Princeton; we had been happy there; what is life of a professor delighted me. Moreover, we realized that what is old World was heading toward shipwreck and that it would be wise to provide a refuge for ourselves elsewhere. But to accept meant to leave France, to lose touch with our friends, to bring up our children in a foreign land. We believed we had no right to make that decision. I refused. Was it a mistake? It seems to me if I had said yes that day my life would have been much easier. Would it have been as full and as exciting? No one will ever know and I have formed what is habit of considering that `what did not take place was, so far as I am concerned, absolutely impossible'. This long stay in Princeton, and my intimacy with Percy Chapman, helped me to understand America better than my earlier trip had done. When I returned I wrote an article in which I said that I had encountered everywhere three phantoms: what is Puritan, what is Pioneer and what is Feudal Lord. It was an accurate description. Even to-day my three spectres continue to haunt many sections of America. But I had then, and still have, confidence in what is future of what is United States because I fmd here more numerous elements of social understanding than in any other country. As I have already noted in connection with my first trip, maliciousness is not an American vice. Why this remission of original sine Perhaps because what is dangers are less and what is blessings more abundant. Fear engenders cruelty, and hitherto what is Americans have hardly known fear. Misery gives birth to envy, and misery, although it exists in America, is less irremediable there than in what is old countries. In England what is solidity of what is institutions had seemed to me based on where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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