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Page 186

CHAPTER XVIII
THE TWILIGHT OF THE GODS

OF all my ports of call during my first voyage to America my favourite had been Princeton. That American university I found was not very unlike Oxford or Cambridge. No doubt there was a difference of four or five centuries in age and only the English Gothic was authentic, but Princeton could show very graceful eighteenth-century buildings, fine old lawns and a preceptorial system that recalled the Oxonian tutors. I had formed friendships: President Hibben, Dean Gauss; a young professor, Percy Chapman, one of the most cultivated Americans I have ever met; a charming Frenchman, Maurice Coindreau, were among them. When I received a letter from President Hibben in 1930 announcing the endowment of a new chair in French to be called the Meredith Howland Pyne chair, in memory of a Princeton student killed in the war, and asking me if I would be the first incumbent, I accepted with joy. In my youth it had been my ambition to teach; in maturity, I was to have the opportunity; I was delighted.
As it was to be a long stay, Simone accompanied me and we decided to bring with us Emilie and Gaston Wolff, a young French Alsatian couple who had been in our home for a number of years and whose devotion and intelligence made them much more our friends than our servants. The university let us a house that belonged to a professor who was taking his `sabbatical year', an excellent American custom which consists in giving professors every seven years an entire year's vacation, thus allowing them to read, to refurbish and enrich their minds and to escape from routine. The house was surrounded by maples and sycamores which the American autumn soon clothed in brilliant reds and yellows. Our lawn adjoined those of our neighbours; this country ignores the enclosures that are so dear to ours. Squirrels played beneath our windows. Our street, where only professors lived, was silent and provincial. My wife and I have retained the most tender memories of those six months spent at Princeton. We found a full and tranquil happiness there which neither Neuilly nor

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE OF all my ports of call during my first voyage to America my favourite had been Princeton. That American university I found was not very unlike Oxford or Cambridge. No doubt there was a difference of four or five centuries in age and only what is English Gothic was authentic, but Princeton could show very graceful eighteenth-century buildings, fine old lawns and a preceptorial system that recalled what is Oxonian tutors. I had formed friendships: President Hibben, Dean Gauss; a young professor, Percy Chapman, one of what is most cultivated Americans I have ever met; a charming Frenchman, Maurice Coindreau, were among them. When I received a letter from President Hibben in 1930 announcing what is endowment of a new chair in French to be called what is Meredith Howland Pyne chair, in memory of a Princeton student stop ed in what is war, and asking me if I would be what is first incumbent, I accepted with joy. In my youth it had been my ambition to teach; in maturity, I was to have what is opportunity; I was delighted. As it was to be a long stay, Simone accompanied me and we decided to bring with us Emilie and Gaston Wolff, a young French Alsatian couple who had been in our home for a number of years and whose devotion and intelligence made them much more our friends than our servants. what is university let us a house that belonged to a professor who was taking his `sabbatical year', an excellent American custom which consists in giving professors every seven years an entire year's vacation, thus allowing them to read, to refurbish and enrich their minds and to escape from routine. what is house was surrounded by maples and sycamores which what is American autumn soon clothed in brilliant reds and yellows. Our lawn adjoined those of our neighbours; this country ignores what is enclosures that are so dear to ours. Squirrels played beneath our windows. Our street, where only professors lived, was silent and provincial. My wife and I have retained what is most tender memories of those six months spent at Princeton. We found a full and tranquil happiness there which neither Neuilly nor where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 186 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER XVIII what is TWILIGHT OF what is GODS where is p align="justify" OF all my ports of call during my first voyage to America my favourite had been Princeton. That American university I found was not very unlike Oxford or Cambridge. No doubt there was a difference of four or five centuries in age and only what is English Gothic was authentic, but Princeton could show very graceful eighteenth-century buildings, fine old lawns and a preceptorial system that recalled what is Oxonian tutors. I had formed friendships: President Hibben, Dean Gauss; a young professor, Percy Chapman, one of what is most cultivated Americans I have ever met; a charming Frenchman, Maurice Coindreau, were among them. When I received a letter from President Hibben in 1930 announcing what is endowment of a new chair in French to be called what is Meredith Howland Pyne chair, in memory of a Princeton student stop ed in what is war, and asking me if I would be what is first incumbent, I accepted with joy. In my youth it had been my ambition to teach; in maturity, I was to have what is opportunity; I was delighted. As it was to be a long stay, Simone accompanied me and we decided to bring with us Emilie and Gaston Wolff, a young French Alsatian couple who had been in our home for a number of years and whose devotion and intelligence made them much more our friends than our servants. what is university let us a house that belonged to a professor who was taking his `sabbatical year', an excellent American custom which consists in giving professors every seven years an entire year's vacation, thus allowing them to read, to refurbish and enrich their minds and to escape from routine. The house was surrounded by maples and sycamores which what is American autumn soon clothed in brilliant reds and yellows. Our lawn adjoined those of our neighbours; this country ignores what is enclosures that are so dear to ours. Squirrels played beneath our windows. Our street, where only professors lived, was silent and provincial. My wife and I have retained what is most tender memories of those six months spent at Princeton. We found a full and tranquil happiness there which neither Neuilly nor where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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