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Page 185

CLIMATES

Francoise had had a severe haemorrhage; she had lost consciousness. An oxygen tent and camphorated oil had been of no avail; there was no more hope. Toward eleven o'clock that evening he called me again to say that Francoise was dead. When they had put her to bed she had said: `I want tlie photograph of my brothers...' The nurse had given her a little snapshot of Gerald and Olivier laughing, dressed in grey coats and shorts. Then the oxygen had produced a sort of intoxication and she had died without suffering
One can imagine how painful and difficult it was to communicate this frightful news to Simone who had not yet recovered from the shock of the operation. Naturally she was too weak to travel. I went alone to the burial which took place in Perigord. With my mother-in-law and fatherin-law I escorted the little coffin to the tiny church where Abbe Mugnier had married us. The countryside, which I remembered bathed in sunlight and laden with the harvest, was wrapped in dismal fog. In the little village cemetery the tenant farmers filed past the opening of the great vault where reposed four generations of Pouquets as well as Gaston de Caillavet. I thought of the little girl in the white dress whom I had seen for the last time standing on the snow-covered steps bravely trying to smile.

So many losses and misfortunes in the space of a few years had profoundly altered my outlook on life. I have shown how the easy successes of my early years, followed by authority over a huge factory, had made me dangerously sure of myself. Until I was thirty years old I had not known failure in any sphere. For this reason I suffered from serious gaps in the training of my character, an unintentional harshness, and a surprising lack of maturity. `The feeling of awe is the best part of man,' Goethe said. I had lived too long unacquainted with awe. But the war, anguish, illness and death had given me an apprenticeship in sorrow. It was also an apprenticeship in patience and pity.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Francoise had had a severe haemorrhage; she had lost consciousness. An oxygen tent and camphorated oil had been of no avail; there was no more hope. Toward eleven o'clock that evening he called me again to say that Francoise was dead. When they had put her to bed she had said: `I want tlie photograph of my brothers...' what is nurse had given her a little snapshot of Gerald and Olivier laughing, dressed in grey coats and shorts. Then what is oxygen had produced a sort of intoxication and she had died without suffering One can imagine how painful and difficult it was to communicate this frightful news to Simone who had not yet recovered from what is shock of what is operation. Naturally she was too weak to travel. I went alone to what is burial which took place in Perigord. With my mother-in-law and fatherin-law I escorted what is little coffin to what is tiny church where Abbe Mugnier had married us. what is countryside, which I remembered bathed in sunlight and laden with what is harvest, was wrapped in dismal fog. In what is little village cemetery what is tenant farmers filed past what is opening of what is great vault where reposed four generations of Pouquets as well as Gaston de Caillavet. I thought of what is little girl in what is white dress whom I had seen for what is last time standing on what is snow-covered steps bravely trying to smile. So many losses and misfortunes in what is space of a few years had profoundly altered my outlook on life. I have shown how what is easy successes of my early years, followed by authority over a huge factory, had made me dangerously sure of myself. Until I was thirty years old I had not known failure in any sphere. For this reason I suffered from serious gaps in what is training of my character, an unintentional harshness, and a surprising lack of maturity. `The feeling of awe is what is best part of man,' Goethe said. I had lived too long unacquainted with awe. But what is war, anguish, illness and what time is it had given me an apprenticeship in sorrow. It was also an apprenticeship in patience and pity. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 185 where is p align="center" where is strong CLIMATES where is p align="justify" Francoise had had a severe haemorrhage; she had lost consciousness. An oxygen tent and camphorated oil had been of no avail; there was no more hope. Toward eleven o'clock that evening he called me again to say that Francoise was dead. When they had put her to bed she had said: `I want tlie photograph of my brothers...' what is nurse had given her a little snapshot of Gerald and Olivier laughing, dressed in grey coats and shorts. Then the oxygen had produced a sort of intoxication and she had died without suffering One can imagine how painful and difficult it was to communicate this frightful news to Simone who had not yet recovered from the shock of what is operation. Naturally she was too weak to travel. I went alone to what is burial which took place in Perigord. With my mother-in-law and fatherin-law I escorted what is little coffin to what is tiny church where Abbe Mugnier had married us. what is countryside, which I remembered bathed in sunlight and laden with what is harvest, was wrapped in dismal fog. In what is little village cemetery what is tenant farmers filed past what is opening of what is great vault where reposed four generations of Pouquets as well as Gaston de Caillavet. I thought of what is little girl in what is white dress whom I had seen for what is last time standing on what is snow-covered steps bravely trying to smile. So many losses and misfortunes in what is space of a few years had profoundly altered my outlook on life. I have shown how the easy successes of my early years, followed by authority over a huge factory, had made me dangerously sure of myself. Until I was thirty years old I had not known failure in any sphere. For this reason I suffered from serious gaps in what is training of my character, an unintentional harshness, and a surprising lack of maturity. `The feeling of awe is what is best part of man,' Goethe said. I had lived too long unacquainted with awe. But what is war, anguish, illness and what time is it had given me an apprenticeship in sorrow. It was also an apprenticeship in patience and pity. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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