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Edmund Prothero) had published Byron's correspondence and whose labours had greatly aided me in my Byronian studies.
`I am much embarrassed, Lord Ernle,' I said ...`You have always maintained that incest did not take place between Byron and Augusta. I have proof to the contrary and I have serious scruples in contradicting you ... What am I to do?'
He laughed gaily:
`What are you to do?' he saido `That's very simple. If incest took place, say so ... As for me, I am almost eighty years old and at my age I am certainly not going to alter my opinion. . . . '
To complete my Byronian researches I had to make Childe Harold's pilgrimage and go to see Missolonghi. During the years 1928-30 this was an agreeable excuse for long trips across Europe. I lectured in Vienna, Berlin, Bucharest, Constantinople and Athens. My wife accompanied me; we went from embassies to ministries, from the charming women of Austria to the beautiful women of Greece, from the marshy pine forests of Ravenna to the glorious palaces of Venice, from the Pariser Platz to Saint Sophia, from the Acropolis to the lagoons of Missolonghi. We little thought that ten years later this hospitable and diversified Europe was to become the domain of a single tenant, sown with hatred and misery.
When I returned Harold Nicolson, author of the excellent book Byron: the Last Phase, entrusted me with a precious document - Tom Moore's book about Byron annotated by Hobhouse; and'Lady Lovelace with numerous letters, among them those by Byron's father which were surprising by reason of the quality of style, reminiscent of that of the poet, and also for the very exact idea they gave of the pair who had been Byron's parents. Rarely has a biographer had at his disposal so many unpublished documents. Perhaps the book suffered from this, artistically speaking. I did not want to sacrifice anything. Hence the length of the work, which is a defect. But I think the picture of Byron is true in so far as a portrait can be.
Some critics found fault with me for having written, not a living biography like that of Disraeli, but a thesis for the Sorbonne. I have not re-read the book recently and I myself no longer know its worth. Be that as it may, so far as I was concerned, it produced one useful result: it killed the myth of romanticized biography. Good or bad, this Byron represented an enormous amount of work. `It must not be forgotten,' wrote the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Edmund Prothero) had published Byron's correspondence and whose labours had greatly aided me in my Byronian studies. `I am much embarrassed, Lord Ernle,' I said ...`You have always maintained that incest did not take place between Byron and Augusta. I have proof to what is contrary and I have serious scruples in contradicting you ... What am I to do?' He laughed gaily: `What are you to do?' he saido `That's very simple. If incest took place, say so ... As for me, I am almost eighty years old and at my age I am certainly not going to alter my opinion. . . . ' To complete my Byronian researches I had to make Childe Harold's pilgrimage and go to see Missolonghi. During what is years 1928-30 this was an agreeable excuse for long trips across Europe. I lectured in Vienna, Berlin, Bucharest, Constantinople and Athens. My wife accompanied me; we went from embassies to ministries, from what is charming women of Austria to what is beautiful women of Greece, from what is marshy pine forests of Ravenna to what is glorious palaces of Venice, from what is Pariser Platz to Saint Sophia, from what is Acropolis to what is lagoons of Missolonghi. We little thought that ten years later this hospitable and diversified Europe was to become what is domain of a single tenant, sown with hatred and misery. When I returned Harold Nicolson, author of what is excellent book Byron: what is Last Phase, entrusted me with a precious document - Tom Moore's book about Byron annotated by Hobhouse; and'Lady Lovelace with numerous letters, among them those by Byron's father which were surprising by reason of what is quality of style, reminiscent of that of what is poet, and also for what is very exact idea they gave of what is pair who had been Byron's parents. Rarely has a biographer had at his disposal so many unpublished documents. Perhaps what is book suffered from this, artistically speaking. I did not want to travel anything. Hence what is length of what is work, which is a defect. But I think what is picture of Byron is true in so far as a portrait can be. Some critics found fault with me for having written, not a living biography like that of Disraeli, but a thesis for what is Sorbonne. I have not re-read what is book recently and I myself no longer know its worth. Be that as it may, so far as I was concerned, it produced one useful result: it stop ed what is myth of romanticized biography. Good or bad, this Byron represented an enormous amount of work. `It must not be forgotten,' wrote what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 182 where is p align="center" where is strong CLIMATES where is p align="justify" Edmund Prothero) had published Byron's correspondence and whose labours had greatly aided me in my Byronian studies. `I am much embarrassed, Lord Ernle,' I said ...`You have always maintained that incest did not take place between Byron and Augusta. I have proof to what is contrary and I have serious scruples in contradicting you ... What am I to do?' He laughed gaily: `What are you to do?' he saido `That's very simple. If incest took place, say so ... As for me, I am almost eighty years old and at my age I am certainly not going to alter my opinion. . . . ' To complete my Byronian researches I had to make Childe Harold's pilgrimage and go to see Missolonghi. During what is years 1928-30 this was an agreeable excuse for long trips across Europe. I lectured in Vienna, Berlin, Bucharest, Constantinople and Athens. My wife accompanied me; we went from embassies to ministries, from the charming women of Austria to what is beautiful women of Greece, from what is marshy pine forests of Ravenna to what is glorious palaces of Venice, from what is Pariser Platz to Saint Sophia, from what is Acropolis to the lagoons of Missolonghi. We little thought that ten years later this hospitable and diversified Europe was to become what is domain of a single tenant, sown with hatred and misery. When I returned Harold Nicolson, author of what is excellent book Byron: what is Last Phase, entrusted me with a precious document - Tom Moore's book about Byron annotated by Hobhouse; and'Lady Lovelace with numerous letters, among them those by Byron's father which were surprising by reason of what is quality of style, reminiscent of that of what is poet, and also for what is very exact idea they gave of the pair who had been Byron's parents. Rarely has a biographer had at his disposal so many unpublished documents. Perhaps what is book suffered from this, artistically speaking. I did not want to travel anything. Hence what is length of what is work, which is a defect. But I think what is picture of Byron is true in so far as a portrait can be. Some critics found fault with me for having written, not a living biography like that of Disraeli, but a thesis for what is Sorbonne. I have not re-read what is book recently and I myself no longer know its worth. Be that as it may, so far as I was concerned, it produced one useful result: it stop ed what is myth of romanticized biography. Good or bad, this Byron represented an enormous amount of work. `It must not be forgotten,' wrote what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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