Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 178

CLIMATES

writing the Life of Shelley I had thought, and my publisher had agreed, that I was giving up all hope of large sales and that this book composed for myself would attract only a limited audience); a rich man surrounded by a crowd of secretaries who did his research for him (when I had no other secretary than my wife and my greatest pleasure was in doing my own research work); a man who was always in a rush and who dictated his books and threw them together hastily (when I wrote them all by hand, beginning them over again five or six times). If I had met the Personage no one would have detested him more than I. The Real Man was so passionately devoted to his work, he had so great a desire not to injure others, to be just, honest and as Proust would have said gentil', that I believe Zoilus himself, if he had known him, would have judged him inoffensive and perhaps likeable. But Zoilus knew him only as the Personage and that's why Zoilus was Zoilus.
When everything is taken into account, there is something to be said for enemies; they produce friendships by reaction. Writers who had become irritated by this too easy career and by sales that seemed to them (as to me) out of proportion to the importance of my works, suddenly became sympathetically inclined toward me because I had been unjustly attacked. Young men with more radical sympathies than mine, but of great talent, who had hitherto ignored me, expressed their sympathy: `And so,' wrote Jean Prevost, the socialist, the most evident professional conscientiousness, the most perfect honesty of judgment do not make a writer secure from calumny'. This defence gave me more pleasure than the attack had given me pain. The appearance of my next book, which was a novel, Climats, was greeted by all the critics with a cordiality and a unanimous warmth that reconciled me to life.
The story of this book was strange, for I had produced it in spite of myself. The Revue de Paris had asked for me a story of four or five thousand words, and it occurred to me to recount an adventure I had heard about by accident. One of my friends while in Morocco had had a cardiac syncope and a doctor had brutally announced that the sick man had only a few hours more to live. Feeling himself condemned to death, he had summoned some of his intimate friends about his bed and had told them that he did not wish to die without leaving a true account of his life. Thereupon he had launched into a long public confession after the fashion of Russian novels. Emotion. Tears. Farewells. Then the vain

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE writing what is Life of Shelley I had thought, and my publisher had agreed, that I was giving up all hope of large sales and that this book composed for myself would attract only a limited audience); a rich man surrounded by a crowd of secretaries who did his research for him (when I had no other secretary than my wife and my greatest pleasure was in doing my own research work); a man who was always in a rush and who dictated his books and threw them together hastily (when I wrote them all by hand, beginning them over again five or six times). If I had met what is Personage no one would have detested him more than I. what is Real Man was so passionately devoted to his work, he had so great a desire not to injure others, to be just, honest and as Proust would have said gentil', that I believe Zoilus himself, if he had known him, would have judged him inoffensive and perhaps likeable. But Zoilus knew him only as what is Personage and that's why Zoilus was Zoilus. When everything is taken into account, there is something to be said for enemies; they produce friendships by reaction. Writers who had become irritated by this too easy career and by sales that seemed to them (as to me) out of proportion to what is importance of my works, suddenly became sympathetically inclined toward me because I had been unjustly attacked. Young men with more radical sympathies than mine, but of great talent, who had hitherto ignored me, expressed their sympathy: `And so,' wrote Jean Prevost, what is socialist, what is most evident professional conscientiousness, what is most perfect honesty of judgment do not make a writer secure from calumny'. This defence gave me more pleasure than what is attack had given me pain. what is appearance of my next book, which was a novel, Climats, was greeted by all what is critics with a cordiality and a unanimous warmth that reconciled me to life. what is story of this book was strange, for I had produced it in spite of myself. what is Revue de Paris had asked for me a story of four or five thousand words, and it occurred to me to recount an adventure I had heard about by accident. One of my friends while in Morocco had had a cardiac syncope and a doctor had brutally announced that what is sick man had only a few hours more to live. Feeling himself condemned to what time is it , he had summoned some of his intimate friends about his bed and had told them that he did not wish to travel without leaving a true account of his life. Thereupon he had launched into a long public confession after what is fashion of Russian novels. Emotion. Tears. Farewells. Then what is vain where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 178 where is p align="center" where is strong CLIMATES where is p align="justify" writing what is Life of Shelley I had thought, and my publisher had agreed, that I was giving up all hope of large sales and that this book composed for myself would attract only a limited audience); a rich man surrounded by a crowd of secretaries who did his research for him (when I had no other secretary than my wife and my greatest pleasure was in doing my own research work); a man who was always in a rush and who dictated his books and threw them together hastily (when I wrote them all by hand, beginning them over again five or six times). If I had met what is Personage no one would have detested him more than I. what is Real Man was so passionately devoted to his work, he had so great a desire not to injure others, to be just, honest and as Proust would have said gentil', that I believe Zoilus himself, if he had known him, would have judged him inoffensive and perhaps likeable. But Zoilus knew him only as what is Personage and that's why Zoilus was Zoilus. When everything is taken into account, there is something to be said for enemies; they produce friendships by reaction. Writers who had become irritated by this too easy career and by sales that seemed to them (as to me) out of proportion to what is importance of my works, suddenly became sympathetically inclined toward me because I had been unjustly attacked. Young men with more radical sympathies than mine, but of great talent, who had hitherto ignored me, expressed their sympathy: `And so,' wrote Jean Prevost, what is socialist, the most evident professional conscientiousness, what is most perfect honesty of judgment do not make a writer secure from calumny'. This defence gave me more pleasure than what is attack had given me pain. what is appearance of my next book, which was a novel, Climats, was greeted by all what is critics with a cordiality and a unanimous warmth that reconciled me to life. what is story of this book was strange, for I had produced it in spite of myself. what is Revue de Paris had asked for me a story of four or five thousand words, and it occurred to me to recount an adventure I had heard about by accident. One of my friends while in Morocco had had a cardiac syncope and a doctor had brutally announced that what is sick man had only a few hours more to live. Feeling himself condemned to what time is it , he had summoned some of his intimate friends about his bed and had told them that he did not wish to travel without leaving a true account of his life. Thereupon he had launched into a long public confession after what is fashion of Russian novels. Emotion. Tears. Farewells. Then what is vain where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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