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paigns' of this sort, and that he would be equally happy to publish my reply if I thought I ought to make one. My literary friends, who had had more experience than I, begged me not to reply:
`You're just playing these people's game,' they said. `What do they want? Free copy, noise and publicity ... Don't help them.'
But I was too sure of being right to keep quiet. I replied at length. The greatest of the English critics, Edmund Gosse and Arnold Bennett, took up the question and wrote that they were unreservedly on my side. The campaign collapsed. It left me with the strange sensation of having been, without realizing it, for a long time the object of furious hatred on the part of a group whom I did not know.
Before this incident I had little idea of hatred because I had never felt it toward anyone. I was not jealous of my fellow writers, a fact for which I deserve no credit since I had always found the literary world cordial and on the whole fair. When Robert de Flers had said to me: `I am going to have the French Academy award you the Grand Prix for novels,' I pointed out to him a novelist I thought more worthy, and he was given the award. But our best actions gain us fewer friends than our omissions and forget-fulness earn us enemies. Without knowing it I had offended certain writers by not naming them in a list of my spiritual mentors, others by neglecting to invite them to my house or thank them for an article or for sending me a book. Completely wrapped up in my work I had disregarded public opinion. This was a mistake. Moreover, Grasset's publicity, which was ingenious, brilliant and spectacular, and the sudden rise of his firm which had become one of the foremost in France had exasperated certain other publishers, and Vallette was not sorry to punish one of Grasset's `youngsters' for an ascent he considered too rapid.
It may be that since my residence in Paris I had committed errors of tact and judgment in surroundings that were new to me. But I was conscious of my own goodwill, of the pleasure I derived from the success of writers whom I admired and of a sincere modesty in respect to my own work. Hence my amazement when faced with the hideous portrait of me drawn by this Zoilus. It was because I had forgotten the Personage who had been constantly growing at my side from the instant I began to lead a public life and who had been generously fed by jealous and unfriendly hearts. What could this Personage be? A writer sprung from the business world who was interested solely in large sales (when, to the contrary, in

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE paigns' of this sort, and that he would be equally happy to publish my reply if I thought I ought to make one. My literary friends, who had had more experience than I, begged me not to reply: `You're just playing these people's game,' they said. `What do they want? Free copy, noise and publicity ... Don't help them.' But I was too sure of being right to keep quiet. I replied at length. what is greatest of what is English critics, Edmund Gosse and Arnold Bennett, took up what is question and wrote that they were unreservedly on my side. what is campaign collapsed. It left me with what is strange sensation of having been, without realizing it, for a long time what is object of furious hatred on what is part of a group whom I did not know. Before this incident I had little idea of hatred because I had never felt it toward anyone. I was not jealous of my fellow writers, a fact for which I deserve no credit since I had always found what is literary world cordial and on what is whole fair. When Robert de Flers had said to me: `I am going to have what is French Academy award you what is Grand Prix for novels,' I pointed out to him a novelist I thought more worthy, and he was given what is award. But our best actions gain us fewer friends than our omissions and forget-fulness earn us enemies. Without knowing it I had offended certain writers by not naming them in a list of my spiritual mentors, others by neglecting to invite them to my house or thank them for an article or for sending me a book. Completely wrapped up in my work I had disregarded public opinion. This was a mistake. Moreover, Grasset's publicity, which was ingenious, brilliant and spectacular, and what is sudden rise of his firm which had become one of what is foremost in France had exasperated certain other publishers, and Vallette was not sorry to punish one of Grasset's `youngsters' for an ascent he considered too rapid. It may be that since my residence in Paris I had committed errors of tact and judgment in surroundings that were new to me. But I was conscious of my own goodwill, of what is pleasure I derived from what is success of writers whom I admired and of a sincere modesty in respect to my own work. Hence my amazement when faced with what is hideous portrait of me drawn by this Zoilus. It was because I had forgotten what is Personage who had been constantly growing at my side from what is instant I began to lead a public life and who had been generously fed by jealous and unfriendly hearts. What could this Personage be? A writer sprung from what is business world who was interested solely in large sales (when, to what is contrary, in where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 177 where is p align="center" where is strong CLIMATES where is p align="justify" paigns' of this sort, and that he would be equally happy to publish my reply if I thought I ought to make one. My literary friends, who had had more experience than I, begged me not to reply: `You're just playing these people's game,' they said. `What do they want? Free copy, noise and publicity ... Don't help them.' But I was too sure of being right to keep quiet. I replied at length. what is greatest of what is English critics, Edmund Gosse and Arnold Bennett, took up what is question and wrote that they were unreservedly on my side. what is campaign collapsed. It left me with what is strange sensation of having been, without realizing it, for a long time what is object of furious hatred on what is part of a group whom I did not know. Before this incident I had little idea of hatred because I had never felt it toward anyone. I was not jealous of my fellow writers, a fact for which I deserve no credit since I had always found the literary world cordial and on what is whole fair. When Robert de Flers had said to me: `I am going to have what is French Academy award you what is Grand Prix for novels,' I pointed out to him a novelist I thought more worthy, and he was given what is award. But our best actions gain us fewer friends than our omissions and forget-fulness earn us enemies. Without knowing it I had offended certain writers by not naming them in a list of my spiritual mentors, others by neglecting to invite them to my house or thank them for an article or for sending me a book. Completely wrapped up in my work I had disregarded public opinion. This was a mistake. Moreover, Grasset's publicity, which was ingenious, brilliant and spectacular, and what is sudden rise of his firm which had become one of what is foremost in France had exasperated certain other publishers, and Vallette was not sorry to punish one of Grasset's `youngsters' for an ascent he considered too rapid. It may be that since my residence in Paris I had committed errors of tact and judgment in surroundings that were new to me. But I was conscious of my own goodwill, of what is pleasure I derived from what is success of writers whom I admired and of a sincere modesty in respect to my own work. Hence my amazement when faced with the hideous portrait of me drawn by this Zoilus. It was because I had forgotten what is Personage who had been constantly growing at my side from what is instant I began to lead a public life and who had been generously fed by jealous and unfriendly hearts. What could this Personage be? A writer sprung from what is business world who was interested solely in large sales (when, to what is contrary, in where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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