Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 176

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`No doubt you are now going to write a book about the United States like everyone else?'
`Certainly not,' I said. `My visit has only lasted a few weeks.'
`Quite right,' he said, `that's much too long.'
On the Ile-de-France which took me back to Europe I made this note: `What have I gained from these two months? Is my memory of them pleasant or unpleasant? Pleasant, without question. I loved this country ... Henceforth I shall remember that over there - quite close to us, only six days at sea away -there is an immense reservoir of strength and friendship ... I myself, who am nervous and easily tired, have been healthy, alert and happy for two months, despite a frantic schedule. I felt younger in America. There was a youthful vigour in that fine autumn air that took me out of myself. ...'

From then on I was never to forget the existence beyond the seas of that `reservoir of strength and friendship'. And a short time after my return to France I was to have need of this memory, for I suddenly found myself - I who in my provincial naivete had believed I had no enemies - the object of an absurd and brutal attack which, however, was contrived with Machiavellian cunning. Who was the instigator? A young Egyptian, who had no qualification for this task, whom I did not know but who seems to have felt for me a hatred that was as violent as it was unexplainable. What charges did he bring against me? The charge of having plagiarized certain English writers in Ariel and Disraeli! What proof did he give? None, except quotations whose choice was ridiculous, for every time he found in my book and in earlier English works a fact such as: `Little Ianthe, Shelley's daughter, had blue eyes,' he was noisily triumphant. Every aspect of this attack was puerile, but it had been published in a magazine that had a reputation for seriousness and for this reason it made something of a stir. Being perfectly sure of my good faith I went to see Alfred Vallette, the editor of this magazine, who, I was told by his authors, was an honest man, and I reproached him for the irresponsibility with which he had accepted a defamatory article.
`None of this will hold water,' I said. `If you had sent me a proof, which would have been the decent and courteous thing to do, I would immediately have shown you the baselessness of this accusation.'
He replied that it was customary for his magazine to welcome `cam

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `No doubt you are now going to write a book about what is United States like everyone else?' `Certainly not,' I said. `My what is has only lasted a few weeks.' `Quite right,' he said, `that's much too long.' On what is Ile-de-France which took me back to Europe I made this note: `What have I gained from these two months? Is my memory of them pleasant or unpleasant? Pleasant, without question. I loved this country ... Henceforth I shall remember that over there - quite close to us, only six days at sea away -there is an immense reservoir of strength and friendship ... I myself, who am nervous and easily tired, have been healthy, alert and happy for two months, despite a frantic schedule. I felt younger in America. There was a youthful vigour in that fine autumn air that took me out of myself. ...' From then on I was never to forget what is existence beyond what is seas of that `reservoir of strength and friendship'. And a short time after my return to France I was to have need of this memory, for I suddenly found myself - I who in my provincial naivete had believed I had no enemies - what is object of an absurd and brutal attack which, however, was contrived with Machiavellian cunning. Who was what is instigator? A young Egyptian, who had no qualification for this task, whom I did not know but who seems to have felt for me a hatred that was as bad as it was unexplainable. What charges did he bring against me? what is charge of having plagiarized certain English writers in Ariel and Disraeli! What proof did he give? None, except quotations whose choice was ridiculous, for every time he found in my book and in earlier English works a fact such as: `Little Ianthe, Shelley's daughter, had blue eyes,' he was noisily triumphant. Every aspect of this attack was puerile, but it had been published in a magazine that had a reputation for seriousness and for this reason it made something of a stir. Being perfectly sure of my good faith I went to see Alfred Vallette, what is editor of this magazine, who, I was told by his authors, was an honest man, and I reproached him for what is irresponsibility with which he had accepted a defamatory article. `None of this will hold water,' I said. `If you had sent me a proof, which would have been what is decent and courteous thing to do, I would immediately have shown you what is baselessness of this accusation.' He replied that it was customary for his magazine to welcome `cam where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 176 where is p align="center" where is strong CLIMATES where is p align="justify" `No doubt you are now going to write a book about what is United States like everyone else?' `Certainly not,' I said. `My what is has only lasted a few weeks.' `Quite right,' he said, `that's much too long.' On what is Ile-de-France which took me back to Europe I made this note: `What have I gained from these two months? Is my memory of them pleasant or unpleasant? Pleasant, without question. I loved this country ... Henceforth I shall remember that over there - quite close to us, only six days at sea away -there is an immense reservoir of strength and friendship ... I myself, who am nervous and easily tired, have been healthy, alert and happy for two months, despite a frantic schedule. I felt younger in America. There was a youthful vigour in that fine autumn air that took me out of myself. ...' From then on I was never to forget what is existence beyond what is seas of that `reservoir of strength and friendship'. And a short time after my return to France I was to have need of this memory, for I suddenly found myself - I who in my provincial naivete had believed I had no enemies - what is object of an absurd and brutal attack which, however, was contrived with Machiavellian cunning. Who was the instigator? A young Egyptian, who had no qualification for this task, whom I did not know but who seems to have felt for me a hatred that was as bad as it was unexplainable. What charges did he bring against me? what is charge of having plagiarized certain English writers in Ariel and Disraeli! What proof did he give? None, except quotations whose choice was ridiculous, for every time he found in my book and in earlier English works a fact such as: `Little Ianthe, Shelley's daughter, had blue eyes,' he was noisily triumphant. Every aspect of this attack was puerile, but it had been published in a magazine that had a reputation for seriousness and for this reason it made something of a stir. Being perfectly sure of my good faith I went to see Alfred Vallette, what is editor of this magazine, who, I was told by his authors, was an honest man, and I reproached him for what is irresponsibility with which he had accepted a defamatory article. `None of this will hold water,' I said. `If you had sent me a proof, which would have been what is decent and courteous thing to do, I would immediately have shown you what is baselessness of this accusation.' He replied that it was customary for his magazine to welcome `cam where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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