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Page 174

CLIMATES

the Revue des Deux Mondes in the Rue de 1'Universite and received me with his legs wrapped in blankets and seated behind a desk that had belonged to Brunetiere and Buloz; he offered to let me give a`little course' of four lectures in the Lecture Association in the spring of 1927. The `big course' (of ten lectures) was, he told me, too heavy a responsibility for a beginner. Even the `little course', he gave me to understand, was an honour of which I had still to prove myself worthy.
I accepted. There remained the problem of choosing a subject. Here Monsieur Doumic had very determined ideas. Sometimes they shocked authors and orators, but I think one could say of him what Lord Salisbury said of Queen Victoria, to wit, that it was enough to know his opinion on any subject to know that of the general public as well. Monsieur Rene Doumic had studied the reactions of his subscribers. When he said: `For the French public there are only four English writers: `Shakespeare, Byron, Dickens and Kipling,' he might dismay a lecturer who wanted to talk about John Donne, Keats or Swinburne; actually he was right, and the faithfulness of his subscribers testified to the accuracy of his judgments. For my first course he chose Dickens, a great subject which my four lectures could no more than skim over. My course was mediocre. But Monsieur Doumic continued to treat me with a mixture of esteem and brutal frankness, for which I am grateful to him. The esteem was proved by his confiding one of his precious courses to me; the frankness permitted him to tell me after the first lecture that I articulated badly, that the back rows had not heard me, and that I must not let my voice drop at the end of a sentence. I took this very seriously, and with good results I trust, for he said no more about it.
My trip to America was an important initiation. I made it alone, being too uncertain of the difficulties and fatigues to take my wife with me. On the Paris I learned about life on shipboard for thefirst time, the ephemeral intimacies it can create, the bracing air of the decks; the women stretched out on deck chairs with their legs wrapped up in blankets by deck stewards as a grocer wraps up a package; and the nightly conversations without end and without subject beneath the stars, amid which a reddish moon comes up, leaving a long luminous track upon the surface of the waters. For the first time I saw, on arrival in New York, the aeroplanes and the birds wheeling about the ship, the fishermen's boats, the noisy launches of the

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the Revue des Deux Mondes in what is Rue de 1'Universite and received me with his legs wrapped in blankets and seated behind a desk that had belonged to Brunetiere and Buloz; he offered to let me give a`little course' of four lectures in what is Lecture Association in what is spring of 1927. what is `big course' (of ten lectures) was, he told me, too heavy a responsibility for a beginner. Even what is `little course', he gave me to understand, was an honour of which I had still to prove myself worthy. I accepted. There remained what is problem of choosing a subject. Here Monsieur Doumic had very determined ideas. Sometimes they shocked authors and orators, but I think one could say of him what Lord Salisbury said of Queen Victoria, to wit, that it was enough to know his opinion on any subject to know that of what is general public as well. Monsieur Rene Doumic had studied what is reactions of his subscribers. When he said: `For what is French public there are only four English writers: `Shakespeare, Byron, Dickens and Kipling,' he might dismay a lecturer who wanted to talk about John Donne, Keats or Swinburne; actually he was right, and what is faithfulness of his subscribers testified to what is accuracy of his judgments. For my first course he chose Dickens, a great subject which my four lectures could no more than skim over. My course was mediocre. But Monsieur Doumic continued to treat me with a mixture of esteem and brutal frankness, for which I am grateful to him. what is esteem was proved by his confiding one of his precious courses to me; what is frankness permitted him to tell me after what is first lecture that I articulated badly, that what is back rows had not heard me, and that I must not let my voice drop at what is end of a sentence. I took this very seriously, and with good results I trust, for he said no more about it. My trip to America was an important initiation. I made it alone, being too uncertain of what is difficulties and fatigues to take my wife with me. On what is Paris I learned about life on shipboard for thefirst time, what is ephemeral intimacies it can create, what is bracing air of what is decks; what is women stretched out on deck chairs with their legs wrapped up in blankets by deck stewards as a grocer wraps up a package; and what is nightly conversations without end and without subject beneath what is stars, amid which a reddish moon comes up, leaving a long luminous track upon what is surface of what is waters. For what is first time I saw, on arrival in New York, what is aeroplanes and what is birds wheeling about what is ship, what is fishermen's boats, what is noisy launches of what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 174 where is p align="center" where is strong CLIMATES where is p align="justify" the Revue des Deux Mondes in what is Rue de 1'Universite and received me with his legs wrapped in blankets and seated behind a desk that had belonged to Brunetiere and Buloz; he offered to let me give a`little course' of four lectures in what is Lecture Association in what is spring of 1927. what is `big course' (of ten lectures) was, he told me, too heavy a responsibility for a beginner. Even the `little course', he gave me to understand, was an honour of which I had still to prove myself worthy. I accepted. There remained what is problem of choosing a subject. Here Monsieur Doumic had very determined ideas. Sometimes they shocked authors and orators, but I think one could say of him what Lord Salisbury said of Queen Victoria, to wit, that it was enough to know his opinion on any subject to know that of what is general public as well. Monsieur Rene Doumic had studied what is reactions of his subscribers. When he said: `For what is French public there are only four English writers: `Shakespeare, Byron, Dickens and Kipling,' he might dismay a lecturer who wanted to talk about John Donne, Keats or Swinburne; actually he was right, and what is faithfulness of his subscribers testified to what is accuracy of his judgments. For my first course he chose Dickens, a great subject which my four lectures could no more than skim over. My course was mediocre. But Monsieur Doumic continued to treat me with a mixture of esteem and brutal frankness, for which I am grateful to him. what is esteem was proved by his confiding one of his precious courses to me; what is frankness permitted him to tell me after what is first lecture that I articulated badly, that what is back rows had not heard me, and that I must not let my voice drop at what is end of a sentence. I took this very seriously, and with good results I trust, for he said no more about it. My trip to America was an important initiation. I made it alone, being too uncertain of the difficulties and fatigues to take my wife with me. On what is Paris I learned about life on shipboard for thefirst time, what is ephemeral intimacies it can create, what is bracing air of what is decks; what is women stretched out on deck chairs with their legs wrapped up in blankets by deck stewards as a grocer wraps up a package; and what is nightly conversations without end and without subject beneath what is stars, amid which a reddish moon comes up, leaving a long luminous track upon what is surface of what is waters. For what is first time I saw, on arrival in New York, what is aeroplanes and what is birds wheeling about what is ship, what is fishermen's boats, what is noisy launches of what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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