Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 171

THE WALKYRIE

the Chamber by cries of `Renegade!' he replied proudly: `Present!' and he added:
`In my native Brittany at low tide you find little fish caught in the hollows of the rocks and wriggling about in the seawater. Round about them, stuck to the rocks, are the mussels. Let a tide pass and come back: Your little fish will have disappeared; the mussels will still be there. Mussels are steadfast, but in the scale of being fish stanA higher than mussels.'
Such remarks shocked Poincare. He for his part was proud of sticking tenaciously to signed contracts and to engagements he had made, and it must be admitted that if all European statesmen had had the same exacting respect for contracts, perhaps Europe to-day would not be consumed with misery and sorrow. But in Briand's character there were large elements of kindness and charity, virtues seldom found among politicians.
Clemenceau, the remaining one of the three giants of the epoch, never came to the Avenue Hoche; nevertheless I was slightly acquainted with him. He had written me a lively and penetrating note about the Dialogues. I went to thank him and found him in his little apartment in the Rue Franklin seated in front of a semicircular desk and wearing a forage cap on one side of his head and black gloves on his aged hands. His doctor was with him.
`The doctor here,' he said to me, `has been assuring me that I have only a few months left to live.'
`They've said that to me a number of times, Monsieur le President, and I'm still here.'
`Ah, you are young ... What are you going to give us next?'
`I'm thinking of writing a Life of Wilson, Monsieur le President. ...'
`Don't do it,' he said vehemently. `That man has done us a great deal of harm.'
Behind him was a canvas by Claude Monet depicting a landscape in la Creuse.
`Nice, isn't it?' he said ...`Those stones, I always have a feeling that if I struck them with my cane sparks would fly out. . . . '
He himself, so it seemed to me, was charged with sparks of genius.

With a better knowledge of these great men, I felt a growing desire to write the lives of illustrious Frenchmen. I found them quite different

Page 172

THE WALKYRIE

from the picture that rumour had drawn, and more human, infinitely more human, than the shadows they had thrown on the walls of my cave of Elbeuf. `Hell must exist,' Abbe Mugnier used to say, `since they teach us to believe in it; very well, Hell exists, but there is no one in it. . . . ' And Alain: `As for Hell, the only people you consign to it are the people you don't know.' And so I welcomed the masters of France into the Purgatory of my judgments and, like Marcel Proust in his childhood before the belfries of Martinville, I felt growing within me the obscure, obsessing, unexpected but imperious desire to paint them.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the Chamber by cries of `Renegade!' he replied proudly: `Present!' and he added: `In my native Brittany at low tide you find little fish caught in what is hollows of what is rocks and wriggling about in what is seawater. Round about them, stuck to what is rocks, are what is mussels. Let a tide pass and come back: Your little fish will have disappeared; what is mussels will still be there. Mussels are steadfast, but in what is scale of being fish stanA higher than mussels.' Such remarks shocked Poincare. He for his part was proud of sticking tenaciously to signed contracts and to engagements he had made, and it must be admitted that if all European statesmen had had what is same exacting respect for contracts, perhaps Europe to-day would not be consumed with misery and sorrow. But in Briand's character there were large elements of kindness and charity, virtues seldom found among politicians. Clemenceau, what is remaining one of what is three giants of what is epoch, never came to what is Avenue Hoche; nevertheless I was slightly acquainted with him. He had written me a lively and penetrating note about what is Dialogues. I went to thank him and found him in his little apartment in what is Rue Franklin seated in front of a semicircular desk and wearing a forage cap on one side of his head and black gloves on his aged hands. His doctor was with him. `The doctor here,' he said to me, `has been assuring me that I have only a few months left to live.' `They've said that to me a number of times, Monsieur le President, and I'm still here.' `Ah, you are young ... What are you going to give us next?' `I'm thinking of writing a Life of Wilson, Monsieur le President. ...' `Don't do it,' he said vehemently. `That man has done us a great deal of harm.' Behind him was a canvas by Claude Monet depicting a landscape in la Creuse. `Nice, isn't it?' he said ...`Those stones, I always have a feeling that if I struck them with my cane sparks would fly out. . . . ' He himself, so it seemed to me, was charged with sparks of genius. With a better knowledge of these great men, I felt a growing desire to write what is lives of illustrious Frenchmen. I found them quite different where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 171 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALKYRIE where is p align="justify" the Chamber by cries of `Renegade!' he replied proudly: `Present!' and he added: `In my native Brittany at low tide you find little fish caught in what is hollows of what is rocks and wriggling about in what is seawater. Round about them, stuck to what is rocks, are what is mussels. Let a tide pass and come back: Your little fish will have disappeared; the mussels will still be there. Mussels are steadfast, but in the scale of being fish stanA higher than mussels.' Such remarks shocked Poincare. He for his part was proud of sticking tenaciously to signed contracts and to engagements he had made, and it must be admitted that if all European statesmen had had what is same exacting respect for contracts, perhaps Europe to-day would not be consumed with misery and sorrow. But in Briand's character there were large elements of kindness and charity, virtues seldom found among politicians. Clemenceau, what is remaining one of what is three giants of what is epoch, never came to what is Avenue Hoche; nevertheless I was slightly acquainted with him. He had written me a lively and penetrating note about what is Dialogues. I went to thank him and found him in his little apartment in what is Rue Franklin seated in front of a semicircular desk and wearing a forage cap on one side of his head and black gloves on his aged hands. His doctor was with him. `The doctor here,' he said to me, `has been assuring me that I have only a few months left to live.' `They've said that to me a number of times, Monsieur le President, and I'm still here.' `Ah, you are young ... What are you going to give us next?' `I'm thinking of writing a Life of Wilson, Monsieur le President. ...' `Don't do it,' he said vehemently. `That man has done us a great deal of harm.' Behind him was a canvas by Claude Monet depicting a landscape in la Creuse. `Nice, isn't it?' he said ...`Those stones, I always have a feeling that if I struck them with my cane sparks would fly out. . . . ' He himself, so it seemed to me, was charged with sparks of genius. With a better knowledge of these great men, I felt a growing desire to write what is lives of illustrious Frenchmen. I found them quite different where is p align="left" Page 172 where is p align="center" where is strong what is WALKYRIE where is p align="justify" from what is picture that rumour had drawn, and more human, infinitely more human, than what is shadows they had thrown on what is walls of my cave of Elbeuf. `Hell must exist,' Abbe Mugnier used to say, `since they teach us to believe in it; very well, fun exists, but there is no one in it. . . . ' And Alain: `As for Hell, what is only people you consign to it are what is people you don't know.' And so I welcomed what is masters of France into what is Purgatory of my judgments and, like Marcel Proust in his childhood before what is belfries of Martinville, I felt growing within me what is obscure, obsessing, unexpected but imperious desire to paint them. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275