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Page 170

THE WALKYRIE

to understand each other to or take pleasure in meeting. Poincare was a lawyer; Briand a poet. Poincare loved the farmlands of his native Lorraine; Briand the seascapes of his native Brittany. Poincare felt a need of facts and figures; Briand had a horror of figures, and if some inept person provided him with them he forgot them as soon as possible. Poincare wrote out his speeches from the first line to the last in a neat, small, sloping hand and thereafter knew them by heart; Briand would prepare his while rolling one cigarette after another and trying out his arguments on whatever audience chance provided, and would then create his best effects from the reactions of these listeners. Poincare's files were impeccable, aligned like the battalion of chasseurs he had formerly commanded; in the hands of Briand a file soon became so confused that he would discard it in disgust. Poincare governed through bureaux, Briand through hearts. Poincare from Lorraine and hence a neighbour of the Germans feared them; Briand, a Breton, did not fear them enough. Poincare was painfully sensitive to everything people said about him; Briand did not read what was written about him and would cheerfully have said with Queen Victoria: `The important thing is not what they think of me, it is what I think of them.' A wit declared that Poincare knew everything and understood nothing, while Briand knew nothing and understood everything; but this was not true, for Poincar6 understood a great many things and Briand knew and read much more than he admitted.
Both were great servants of the State and of irreproachable honesty. When Poincare would ask Ribiere, his right-hand man, to send some proofs to his publisher Plon, he would call him back and say:
`Don't forget this is a private errand. It must not be done by one of the doormen of the Ministry. Send a messenger boy; here's five francs.'
Briand when he was Minister of Foreign Affairs and had control of thirty million francs in secret funds, handed them on almost untouched to Tardieu, his successor.
`One can say what he likes about Aristide,' Tardieu said to me one day, `and I myself have often opposed his policies, but he was danmably honest. For if he had been willing to spend a small part of that thirty million on newspaper campaigns he could have been President of France!'
But their honesty was of different sorts. When Briand was assailed in

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to understand each other to or take pleasure in meeting. Poincare was a lawyer; Briand a poet. Poincare loved what is farmlands of his native Lorraine; Briand what is seascapes of his native Brittany. Poincare felt a need of facts and figures; Briand had a horror of figures, and if some inept person provided him with them he forgot them as soon as possible. Poincare wrote out his speeches from what is first line to what is last in a neat, small, sloping hand and thereafter knew them by heart; Briand would prepare his while rolling one cigarette after another and trying out his arguments on whatever audience chance provided, and would then create his best effects from what is reactions of these listeners. Poincare's files were impeccable, aligned like what is battalion of chasseurs he had formerly commanded; in what is hands of Briand a file soon became so confused that he would discard it in disgust. Poincare governed through bureaux, Briand through hearts. Poincare from Lorraine and hence a neighbour of what is Germans feared them; Briand, a Breton, did not fear them enough. Poincare was painfully sensitive to everything people said about him; Briand did not read what was written about him and would cheerfully have said with Queen Victoria: `The important thing is not what they think of me, it is what I think of them.' A wit declared that Poincare knew everything and understood nothing, while Briand knew nothing and understood everything; but this was not true, for Poincar6 understood a great many things and Briand knew and read much more than he admitted. Both were great servants of what is State and of irreproachable honesty. When Poincare would ask Ribiere, his right-hand man, to send some proofs to his publisher Plon, he would call him back and say: `Don't forget this is a private errand. It must not be done by one of what is doormen of what is Ministry. Send a messenger boy; here's five francs.' Briand when he was Minister of Foreign Affairs and had control of thirty million francs in secret funds, handed them on almost untouched to Tardieu, his successor. `One can say what he likes about Aristide,' Tardieu said to me one day, `and I myself have often opposed his policies, but he was danmably honest. For if he had been willing to spend a small part of that thirty million on newspaper campaigns he could have been President of France!' But their honesty was of different sorts. When Briand was assailed in where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 170 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALKYRIE where is p align="justify" to understand each other to or take pleasure in meeting. Poincare was a lawyer; Briand a poet. Poincare loved the farmlands of his native Lorraine; Briand what is seascapes of his native Brittany. Poincare felt a need of facts and figures; Briand had a horror of figures, and if some inept person provided him with them he forgot them as soon as possible. Poincare wrote out his speeches from what is first line to what is last in a neat, small, sloping hand and thereafter knew them by heart; Briand would prepare his while rolling one cigarette after another and trying out his arguments on whatever audience chance provided, and would then create his best effects from what is reactions of these listeners. Poincare's files were impeccable, aligned like what is battalion of chasseurs he had formerly commanded; in what is hands of Briand a file soon became so confused that he would discard it in disgust. Poincare governed through bureaux, Briand through hearts. Poincare from Lorraine and hence a neighbour of what is Germans feared them; Briand, a Breton, did not fear them enough. Poincare was painfully sensitive to everything people said about him; Briand did not read what was written about him and would cheerfully have said with Queen Victoria: `The important thing is not what they think of me, it is what I think of them.' A wit declared that Poincare knew everything and understood nothing, while Briand knew nothing and understood everything; but this was not true, for Poincar6 understood a great many things and Briand knew and read much more than he admitted. Both were great servants of what is State and of irreproachable honesty. When Poincare would ask Ribiere, his right-hand man, to send some proofs to his publisher Plon, he would call him back and say: `Don't forget this is a private errand. It must not be done by one of what is doormen of what is Ministry. Send a messenger boy; here's five francs.' Briand when he was Minister of Foreign Affairs and had control of thirty million francs in secret funds, handed them on almost untouched to Tardieu, his successor. `One can say what he likes about Aristide,' Tardieu said to me one day, `and I myself have often opposed his policies, but he was danmably honest. For if he had been willing to spend a small part of that thirty million on newspaper campaigns he could have been President of France!' But their honesty was of different sorts. When Briand was assailed in where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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