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Page 169

THE WALKYRIE

of desperation. I did not notice it. We are all blind when it is only the feelings of others that are at stake. '
The adjustment of friendships in a newly formed household is also a delicate matter. My friends of Pontigny, the Desjardins, Charles Du Bos, continued with affectionate persistence to put me on my guard against the people of society and their enchantments. I confess I did not on that subject agree with them. Society, in its best aspects, taught me a great deal, and in the time of my misfortunes I found it, on the whole, steadfast, and dependable.
One of my great discoveries at that time was men of state. In my province of Normandy I had known the small fry of local political workers; party leaders, ministers and presidents retained in my eyes a legendary quality. I should have been as dumbfounded as Dr. Cottard, if Swann had said to me, as he did to him: `I had lunch at the home of the President of France.' Now at my mother-in-law's home Monsieur Raymond Poincare, former President of the Republic and present Premier, was a guest like any other, human, ready to answer questions (like Monsieur de Norpois at the home of Madame de Villeparisis), and even strangely anxious to explain the part he was playing and to win approval. One day when an American magazine had asked me for an article about him, Simone begged him to tell us his early life. He did so with an obliging, meticulous wealth of detail, constantly turning to his wife whom he treated with touching tenderness and attention:
`Isn't that so, Henriette? Surely it was in 1897?...'
That day I learned it was entirely by accident that he had got into politics and that he had not planned to. A surprising characteristic was that he continued to be shy, and this resulted in a certain brusqueness:
`Don't go abroad too much,' he said to me. `As soon as one leaves the Place de la Concorde one ceases to make sense. ...'
His honesty and patriotism inspired respect. He had been ready to collaborate with Briand or Clemenceau, neither of whom he liked, whenever the safety of France demanded it. From the moment I met him I sent him every one of my books. He replied, with an almost unique courtesy, by long letters in his own hand in which the book was analysed and praised with intelligence, precision and terseness.
Briand had long been a frequenter of the Avenue Hoche, but he never came there at the same time as Poincare. The two men were too different

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of desperation. I did not notice it. We are all blind when it is only what is feelings of others that are at stake. ' what is adjustment of friendships in a newly formed household is also a delicate matter. My friends of Pontigny, what is Desjardins, Charles Du Bos, continued with affectionate persistence to put me on my guard against what is people of society and their enchantments. I confess I did not on that subject agree with them. Society, in its best aspects, taught me a great deal, and in what is time of my misfortunes I found it, on what is whole, steadfast, and dependable. One of my great discoveries at that time was men of state. In my province of Normandy I had known what is small fry of local political workers; party leaders, ministers and presidents retained in my eyes a legendary quality. I should have been as dumbfounded as Dr. Cottard, if Swann had said to me, as he did to him: `I had lunch at what is home of what is President of France.' Now at my mother-in-law's home Monsieur Raymond Poincare, former President of what is Republic and present Premier, was a guest like any other, human, ready to answer questions (like Monsieur de Norpois at what is home of Madame de Villeparisis), and even strangely anxious to explain what is part he was playing and to win approval. One day when an American magazine had asked me for an article about him, Simone begged him to tell us his early life. He did so with an obliging, meticulous wealth of detail, constantly turning to his wife whom he treated with touching tenderness and attention: `Isn't that so, Henriette? Surely it was in 1897?...' That day I learned it was entirely by accident that he had got into politics and that he had not planned to. A surprising characteristic was that he continued to be shy, and this resulted in a certain brusqueness: `Don't go abroad too much,' he said to me. `As soon as one leaves what is Place de la Concorde one ceases to make sense. ...' His honesty and patriotism inspired respect. He had been ready to collaborate with Briand or Clemenceau, neither of whom he liked, whenever what is safety of France demanded it. From what is moment I met him I sent him every one of my books. He replied, with an almost unique courtesy, by long letters in his own hand in which what is book was analysed and praised with intelligence, precision and terseness. Briand had long been a frequenter of what is Avenue Hoche, but he never came there at what is same time as Poincare. what is two men were too different where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 169 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALKYRIE where is p align="justify" of desperation. I did not notice it. We are all blind when it is only what is feelings of others that are at stake. ' what is adjustment of friendships in a newly formed household is also a delicate matter. My friends of Pontigny, what is Desjardins, Charles Du Bos, continued with affectionate persistence to put me on my guard against what is people of society and their enchantments. I confess I did not on that subject agree with them. Society, in its best aspects, taught me a great deal, and in what is time of my misfortunes I found it, on what is whole, steadfast, and dependable. One of my great discoveries at that time was men of state. In my province of Normandy I had known what is small fry of local political workers; party leaders, ministers and presidents retained in my eyes a legendary quality. I should have been as dumbfounded as Dr. Cottard, if Swann had said to me, as he did to him: `I had lunch at what is home of what is President of France.' Now at my mother-in-law's home Monsieur Raymond Poincare, former President of what is Republic and present Premier, was a guest like any other, human, ready to answer questions (like Monsieur de Norpois at what is home of Madame de Villeparisis), and even strangely anxious to explain what is part he was playing and to win approval. One day when an American magazine had asked me for an article about him, Simone begged him to tell us his early life. He did so with an obliging, meticulous wealth of detail, constantly turning to his wife whom he treated with touching tenderness and attention: `Isn't that so, Henriette? Surely it was in 1897?...' That day I learned it was entirely by accident that he had got into politics and that he had not planned to. A surprising characteristic was that he continued to be shy, and this resulted in a certain brusqueness: `Don't go abroad too much,' he said to me. `As soon as one leaves what is Place de la Concorde one ceases to make sense. ...' His honesty and patriotism inspired respect. He had been ready to collaborate with Briand or Clemenceau, neither of whom he liked, whenever what is safety of France demanded it. From what is moment I met him I sent him every one of my books. He replied, with an almost unique courtesy, by long letters in his own hand in which what is book was analysed and praised with intelligence, precision and terseness. Briand had long been a frequenter of what is Avenue Hoche, but he never came there at what is same time as Poincare. what is two men were too different where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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