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Page 165

THE WALKYRIE

have worked all night, she brought me an impeccable text. The perfection of the margins recalled the amazing garden of little Chinese wands that was her handwriting. I entrusted her with other work. Then one day I said to her jokingly that if she also knew shorthand I would never want any other secretary. Without saying a word to me she took lessons in shorthand and a few months later asked me to dictate letters to her. Through hard work and determination she had become in record time the best stenographer I had ever had. Anatole France had well described her as 'Minerva the craftsman', who performed her tasks with singular and meticulous perfection.
We found so much pleasure in being together that we paid no heed to the reactions of our families and our friends, who complained that they never found us free any more. Many of those around us understood more clearly than we ourselves that we were drifting toward marriage. At one of Madame Pouguet's `Sundays' in the Avenue Hoche, Marshal P6tain found me sitting with Simone on a sofa and asked smilingly:
`When will it be proper to congratulate you?'
Rumours in the little newspapers predicted our marriage. Even my mother said to me:
`How can you live without a woman in your house? ... Who will bring up your children? . . . '
Yes, it seemed wise for me to marry again, and if I should do so, Simone was a companion after my own heart who was capable of taking a living part in my work and whom I loved. But her friends, like mine, tried to dissuade us from the idea. In the eyes of Pontigny, an alliance with the world of Figaro and l'Habit Vert seemed a frivolous contract and a danger to my work. Charles Du Bos, with his kind and touching gravity, put me on my guard against `the salons'. Ah, if he had only known how little I liked them! To Simone people said:
`Marry a widower with three children, what a mistake! You will have endless conflicts with grandmothers and governesses!'
Moreover she had always said that she would never remarry. She had had brilliant opportunities more than once and had rejected them. In the independent life, which her inheritance from her father assured her, she had found peace, a little dull perhaps, but such as marriage had not afforded her. Her instinct prompted her to preserve it.
Nevertheless when it became evident that the manners and customs of

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE have worked all night, she brought me an impeccable text. what is perfection of what is margins recalled what is amazing garden of little Chinese wands that was her handwriting. I entrusted her with other work. Then one day I said to her jokingly that if she also knew shorthand I would never want any other secretary. Without saying a word to me she took lessons in shorthand and a few months later asked me to dictate letters to her. Through hard work and determination she had become in record time what is best stenographer I had ever had. Anatole France had well described her as 'Minerva what is craftsman', who performed her tasks with singular and meticulous perfection. We found so much pleasure in being together that we paid no heed to what is reactions of our families and our friends, who complained that they never found us free any more. Many of those around us understood more clearly than we ourselves that we were drifting toward marriage. At one of Madame Pouguet's `Sundays' in what is Avenue Hoche, Marshal P6tain found me sitting with Simone on a sofa and asked smilingly: `When will it be proper to congratulate you?' Rumours in what is little newspapers predicted our marriage. Even my mother said to me: `How can you live without a woman in your house? ... Who will bring up your children? . . . ' Yes, it seemed wise for me to marry again, and if I should do so, Simone was a companion after my own heart who was capable of taking a living part in my work and whom I loved. But her friends, like mine, tried to dissuade us from what is idea. In what is eyes of Pontigny, an alliance with what is world of Figaro and l'Habit Vert seemed a frivolous contract and a danger to my work. Charles Du Bos, with his kind and touching gravity, put me on my guard against `the salons'. Ah, if he had only known how little I liked them! To Simone people said: `Marry a widower with three children, what a mistake! You will have endless conflicts with grandmothers and governesses!' Moreover she had always said that she would never remarry. She had had brilliant opportunities more than once and had rejected them. In what is independent life, which her inheritance from her father assured her, she had found peace, a little dull perhaps, but such as marriage had not afforded her. Her instinct prompted her to preserve it. Nevertheless when it became evident that what is manners and customs of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 165 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALKYRIE where is p align="justify" have worked all night, she brought me an impeccable text. what is perfection of what is margins recalled what is amazing garden of little Chinese wands that was her handwriting. I entrusted her with other work. Then one day I said to her jokingly that if she also knew shorthand I would never want any other secretary. Without saying a word to me she took lessons in shorthand and a few months later asked me to dictate letters to her. Through hard work and determination she had become in record time what is best stenographer I had ever had. Anatole France had well described her as 'Minerva what is craftsman', who performed her tasks with singular and meticulous perfection. We found so much pleasure in being together that we paid no heed to what is reactions of our families and our friends, who complained that they never found us free any more. Many of those around us understood more clearly than we ourselves that we were drifting toward marriage. At one of Madame Pouguet's `Sundays' in what is Avenue Hoche, Marshal P6tain found me sitting with Simone on a sofa and asked smilingly: `When will it be proper to congratulate you?' Rumours in what is little newspapers predicted our marriage. Even my mother said to me: `How can you live without a woman in your house? ... Who will bring up your children? . . . ' Yes, it seemed wise for me to marry again, and if I should do so, Simone was a companion after my own heart who was capable of taking a living part in my work and whom I loved. But her friends, like mine, tried to dissuade us from what is idea. In what is eyes of Pontigny, an alliance with what is world of Figaro and l'Habit Vert seemed a frivolous contract and a danger to my work. Charles Du Bos, with his kind and touching gravity, put me on my guard against `the salons'. Ah, if he had only known how little I liked them! To Simone people said: `Marry a widower with three children, what a mistake! You will have endless conflicts with grandmothers and governesses!' Moreover she had always said that she would never remarry. She had had brilliant opportunities more than once and had rejected them. In what is independent life, which her inheritance from her father assured her, she had found peace, a little dull perhaps, but such as marriage had not afforded her. Her instinct prompted her to preserve it. Nevertheless when it became evident that what is manners and customs of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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