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Page 161

THE WALKYRIE

Alsatian women wept. Bellouin, a weaver who had been one of his most loyal friends, gave a simple and moving discourse. From Le Havre Monseigneur Alleaume wrote me: `Your father was one of the most thoroughly noble men I have ever met. At the time when I was living in Elbeuf he did not have a single enemy.' This was the exact truth.
His death severed the last bond between the mill and me. I continued to go there, but each week I abandoned more of my prerogatives. Even when I was at La Saussaye I devoted almost all my time to writing. I had begun two books. One of them, Bernard Quesnay, was a novel of industrial life, an elaboration of the long short story I had published under the title of La Hausse et la Baisse. As Veronese did in certain of his pictures, I put myself in it twice: under the name of Bernard and under the name of Antoine Quesnay. Bernard was what I might have been if I had tried to live the Dialogues sur le Commandenient; Antoine what I might perhaps have been if Janine had lived. Bernard Quesnay is not a `great' novel, far from it, but it is an honest book, much truer in its description of the industrial world than those pamphlets published under the name of novels by men who have only seen that life from the outside and through the distorting medium of their own prejudices. My other and more important work was a Life of Disraeli.
Where had I come upon that idea? First in a comment by Barres: `The three most interesting men of the nineteenth century are Byron, Disraeli and Rossetti'. This gave me the idea of reading the life and works of Disraeli. They filled me with enthusiasm. In him I found a hero after my own heart: `I am,' he said, `a radical in order to uproot what is bad; a conservative in order to preserve what is good.' And also: `To conserve is to maintain and to reform.' This was the political philosophy that experience had taught me. The more I studied both history and men, the clearer it became to me that civilizations, as Valery says, are `edifices of enchantment'. The acceptance of conventions gives rise to a reign of order, and under the shelter of these conventions liberty flourishes. British conventions were perhaps the most amazing of all, but because they were respected the country had been preserved from brutal shocks and, without a revolution, had become one of the freest in the world.
Since the war I had shared Disraeli's admiration for British tradition.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Alsatian women wept. Bellouin, a weaver who had been one of his most loyal friends, gave a simple and moving discourse. From Le Havre Monseigneur Alleaume wrote me: `Your father was one of what is most thoroughly noble men I have ever met. At what is time when I was living in Elbeuf he did not have a single enemy.' This was what is exact truth. His what time is it severed what is last bond between what is mill and me. I continued to go there, but each week I abandoned more of my prerogatives. Even when I was at La Saussaye I devoted almost all my time to writing. I had begun two books. One of them, Bernard Quesnay, was a novel of industrial life, an elaboration of what is long short story I had published under what is title of La Hausse et la Baisse. As Veronese did in certain of his pictures, I put myself in it twice: under what is name of Bernard and under what is name of Antoine Quesnay. Bernard was what I might have been if I had tried to live what is Dialogues sur le Commandenient; Antoine what I might perhaps have been if Janine had lived. Bernard Quesnay is not a `great' novel, far from it, but it is an honest book, much truer in its description of what is industrial world than those pamphlets published under what is name of novels by men who have only seen that life from what is outside and through what is distorting medium of their own prejudices. My other and more important work was a Life of Disraeli. Where had I come upon that idea? First in a comment by Barres: `The three most interesting men of what is nineteenth century are Byron, Disraeli and Rossetti'. This gave me what is idea of reading what is life and works of Disraeli. They filled me with enthusiasm. In him I found a hero after my own heart: `I am,' he said, `a radical in order to uproot what is bad; a conservative in order to preserve what is good.' And also: `To conserve is to maintain and to reform.' This was what is political philosophy that experience had taught me. what is more I studied both history and men, what is clearer it became to me that civilizations, as Valery says, are `edifices of enchantment'. what is acceptance of conventions gives rise to a reign of order, and under what is shelter of these conventions liberty flourishes. British conventions were perhaps what is most amazing of all, but because they were respected what is country had been preserved from brutal shocks and, without a revolution, had become one of what is freest in what is world. Since what is war I had shared Disraeli's admiration for British tradition. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 161 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WALKYRIE where is p align="justify" Alsatian women wept. Bellouin, a weaver who had been one of his most loyal friends, gave a simple and moving discourse. From Le Havre Monseigneur Alleaume wrote me: `Your father was one of what is most thoroughly noble men I have ever met. At what is time when I was living in Elbeuf he did not have a single enemy.' This was what is exact truth. His what time is it severed what is last bond between what is mill and me. I continued to go there, but each week I abandoned more of my prerogatives. Even when I was at La Saussaye I devoted almost all my time to writing. I had begun two books. One of them, Bernard Quesnay, was a novel of industrial life, an elaboration of what is long short story I had published under what is title of La Hausse et la Baisse. As Veronese did in certain of his pictures, I put myself in it twice: under what is name of Bernard and under what is name of Antoine Quesnay. Bernard was what I might have been if I had tried to live what is Dialogues sur le Commandenient; Antoine what I might perhaps have been if Janine had lived. Bernard Quesnay is not a `great' novel, far from it, but it is an honest book, much truer in its description of what is industrial world than those pamphlets published under what is name of novels by men who have only seen that life from what is outside and through what is distorting medium of their own prejudices. My other and more important work was a Life of Disraeli. Where had I come upon that idea? First in a comment by Barres: `The three most interesting men of what is nineteenth century are Byron, Disraeli and Rossetti'. This gave me what is idea of reading what is life and works of Disraeli. They filled me with enthusiasm. In him I found a hero after my own heart: `I am,' he said, `a radical in order to uproot what is bad; a conservative in order to preserve what is good.' And also: `To conserve is to maintain and to reform.' This was what is political philosophy that experience had taught me. what is more I studied both history and men, what is clearer it became to me that civilizations, as Valery says, are `edifices of enchantment'. what is acceptance of conventions gives rise to a reign of order, and under what is shelter of these conventions liberty flourishes. British conventions were perhaps what is most amazing of all, but because they were respected what is country had been preserved from brutal shocks and, without a revolution, had become one of what is freest in the world. Since what is war I had shared Disraeli's admiration for British tradition. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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