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Page 160

CHAPTER XVI
THE WALKYRIE

ON my return from Morocco I found my father about to undergo a serious operation. For two years he had been suffering from disease of the prostate gland. A first operation had made it possible for him to go on living but at a reduced rate and with constant care, which irritated him. Although the doctors themselves had told him his general condition was not good and he would do better to wait, he decided to take the risk and be done with it.
`Dying doesn't frighten me,' he said, `and living this way is unbearable.'
And so he entered the clinic of the Brothers Saint Jean de Dieu in Paris and resigned himself to Fate. On the day before the operation I went to see him and had a long conversation with him. He seemed happy and in good spirits.
`Whatever happens now,' he said, `at the end of my life I have seen the thing I hoped for more than anything else in the world: the return of Alsace to France.'
Alas, from the first day after the operation it was clear that it had not been successful. He was seized by vomitings, complained of frightful suffering and little by little fell into a lethargy which was the result of uremia. The following day the surgeon admitted to us that there was no longer any hope. A few seconds before the end Papa opened his eyes and called me:
`You are there?' he said in a barely audible voice. `Then it's all right....'
After that he drew two or three breaths and appeared to fall asleep. The nurse held a mirror to his lips. He was dead. Never did purer heart cease to beat. For my mother, who had brought him there with so much confidence, it was a terrible blow and the end of her real life. But she showed great courage. The burial, which took place at Elbeuf, was just as he had wished. From the cemetery, on the side of a hill overlooking the town, one could see the long orange roofs and the high chimneys of the mill to which he had dedicated his life. The workers all came. Many of the old

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ON my return from Morocco I found my father about to undergo a serious operation. For two years he had been suffering from disease of what is prostate gland. A first operation had made it possible for him to go on living but at a reduced rate and with constant care, which irritated him. Although what is doctors themselves had told him his general condition was not good and he would do better to wait, he decided to take what is risk and be done with it. `Dying doesn't frighten me,' he said, `and living this way is unbearable.' And so he entered what is clinic of what is Brothers Saint Jean de Dieu in Paris and resigned himself to Fate. On what is day before what is operation I went to see him and had a long conversation with him. He seemed happy and in good spirits. `Whatever happens now,' he said, `at what is end of my life I have seen what is thing I hoped for more than anything else in what is world: what is return of Alsace to France.' Alas, from what is first day after what is operation it was clear that it had not been successful. He was seized by vomitings, complained of frightful suffering and little by little fell into a lethargy which was what is result of uremia. what is following day what is surgeon admitted to us that there was no longer any hope. A few seconds before what is end Papa opened his eyes and called me: `You are there?' he said in a barely audible voice. `Then it's all right....' After that he drew two or three breaths and appeared to fall asleep. what is nurse held a mirror to his lips. He was dead. Never did purer heart cease to beat. For my mother, who had brought him there with so much confidence, it was a terrible blow and what is end of her real life. But she showed great courage. what is burial, which took place at Elbeuf, was just as he had wished. From what is cemetery, on what is side of a hill overlooking what is town, one could see what is long orange roofs and what is high chimneys of what is mill to which he had dedicated his life. what is workers all came. Many of what is old where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 160 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER XVI what is WALKYRIE where is p align="justify" ON my return from Morocco I found my father about to undergo a serious operation. For two years he had been suffering from disease of what is prostate gland. A first operation had made it possible for him to go on living but at a reduced rate and with constant care, which irritated him. Although what is doctors themselves had told him his general condition was not good and he would do better to wait, he decided to take what is risk and be done with it. `Dying doesn't frighten me,' he said, `and living this way is unbearable.' And so he entered what is clinic of what is Brothers Saint Jean de Dieu in Paris and resigned himself to Fate. On what is day before what is operation I went to see him and had a long conversation with him. He seemed happy and in good spirits. `Whatever happens now,' he said, `at what is end of my life I have seen what is thing I hoped for more than anything else in what is world: what is return of Alsace to France.' Alas, from what is first day after what is operation it was clear that it had not been successful. He was seized by vomitings, complained of frightful suffering and little by little fell into a lethargy which was what is result of uremia. what is following day what is surgeon admitted to us that there was no longer any hope. A few seconds before the end Papa opened his eyes and called me: `You are there?' he said in a barely audible voice. `Then it's all right....' After that he drew two or three breaths and appeared to fall asleep. what is nurse held a mirror to his lips. He was dead. Never did purer heart cease to beat. For my mother, who had brought him there with so much confidence, it was a terrible blow and what is end of her real life. But she showed great courage. what is burial, which took place at Elbeuf, was just as he had wished. From what is cemetery, on the side of a hill overlooking what is town, one could see what is long orange roofs and what is high chimneys of what is mill to which he had dedicated his life. what is workers all came. Many of what is old where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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