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Page 156

LIFE MUST GO ON

`Well then . . . '
He led us at a run among the cubical Arab houses of rough stucco covered with pink geraniums and violet-coloured bougainvillea blossoms. Sometimes to make his plans clear to us he would leap upon the pedestal of some statue and with a sweeping gesture of his cane would indicate future edifices. Finally he brought us back to the harbour. We were having trouble to keep up.
`Come on, come on!' he cried to us. `Good Lord, how slow you walk! In an action time is everything ... All right. Here we are. Now listen ... Monsieur Delandres, engineer in charge of the harbour, is going to explain the progress of operations . . . And you, Delandres, above all, put it in logical order.'
Monsieur Delandres told us how it had been necessary, since the Port of Casablanca was blocked by a bar, to extend the breakwater far enough to break up the bar; he explained the facilities provided for the export of phosphates.
`Very good,' the Marshal said. `Now in my turn I am going to explain the philosophy of the thing ... When I began this harbour everyone said: "Lyautey is planning on too large a scale. He is mad!" But that made no difference to me: I thought: "This is a great country. The demands will come. I must be ready . . . " Good ... You know that quite near here at Kouriga they found deposits of phosphates which are the best in the world. This year we will produce six hundred thousand tons; next year we will reach a million ... Now these phosphates by themselves would justify the importance given to the harbour ... Very good ... You say to me: "And if there hadn't been any phosphates?" ... Yes ... But my reply is that there are always phosphates ... When one does something, he must have confidence in what he's doing.'
One can easily imagine how this wonderful success, this intelligent activity, this rational exercise of authority would fill with enthusiasm the author of Dialogues stir le Commandement. In Lyautey I found the best traits of the man of action whom I had tried to portray. In the following days he took us to see Rabat, Marrakesh and Meknes. The more I saw the extent of his work, the more I admired its perfection. Under the convenient fiction of the Protectorate, this great leader had freed Frenchmen from the tyranny of bureaucracy and, behold, the French in a few years had established a model country.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Well then . . . ' He led us at a run among what is cubical Arab houses of rough stucco covered with pink geraniums and violet-coloured bougainvillea blossoms. Sometimes to make his plans clear to us he would leap upon what is pedestal of some statue and with a sweeping gesture of his cane would indicate future edifices. Finally he brought us back to what is harbour. We were having trouble to keep up. `Come on, come on!' he cried to us. `Good Lord, how slow you walk! In an action time is everything ... All right. Here we are. Now listen ... Monsieur Delandres, engineer in charge of what is harbour, is going to explain what is progress of operations . . . And you, Delandres, above all, put it in logical order.' Monsieur Delandres told us how it had been necessary, since what is Port of Casablanca was blocked by a bar, to extend what is breakwater far enough to break up what is bar; he explained what is facilities provided for what is export of phosphates. `Very good,' what is Marshal said. `Now in my turn I am going to explain what is philosophy of what is thing ... When I began this harbour everyone said: "Lyautey is planning on too large a scale. He is mad!" But that made no difference to me: I thought: "This is a great country. what is demands will come. I must be ready . . . " Good ... You know that quite near here at Kouriga they found deposits of phosphates which are what is best in what is world. This year we will produce six hundred thousand tons; next year we will reach a million ... Now these phosphates by themselves would justify what is importance given to what is harbour ... Very good ... You say to me: "And if there hadn't been any phosphates?" ... Yes ... But my reply is that there are always phosphates ... When one does something, he must have confidence in what he's doing.' One can easily imagine how this wonderful success, this intelligent activity, this rational exercise of authority would fill with enthusiasm what is author of Dialogues stir le Commandement. In Lyautey I found what is best traits of what is man of action whom I had tried to portray. In what is following days he took us to see Rabat, Marrakesh and Meknes. what is more I saw what is extent of his work, what is more I admired its perfection. Under what is convenient fiction of what is Protectorate, this great leader had freed Frenchmen from what is tyranny of bureaucracy and, behold, what is French in a few years had established a model country. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 156 where is p align="center" where is strong LIFE MUST GO ON where is p align="justify" `Well then . . . ' He led us at a run among what is cubical Arab houses of rough stucco covered with pink geraniums and violet-coloured bougainvillea blossoms. Sometimes to make his plans clear to us he would leap upon what is pedestal of some statue and with a sweeping gesture of his cane would indicate future edifices. Finally he brought us back to what is harbour. We were having trouble to keep up. `Come on, come on!' he cried to us. `Good Lord, how slow you walk! In an action time is everything ... All right. Here we are. Now listen ... Monsieur Delandres, engineer in charge of what is harbour, is going to explain what is progress of operations . . . And you, Delandres, above all, put it in logical order.' Monsieur Delandres told us how it had been necessary, since the Port of Casablanca was blocked by a bar, to extend what is breakwater far enough to break up what is bar; he explained what is facilities provided for what is export of phosphates. `Very good,' what is Marshal said. `Now in my turn I am going to explain what is philosophy of what is thing ... When I began this harbour everyone said: "Lyautey is planning on too large a scale. He is mad!" But that made no difference to me: I thought: "This is a great country. what is demands will come. I must be ready . . . " Good ... You know that quite near here at Kouriga they found deposits of phosphates which are what is best in what is world. This year we will produce six hundred thousand tons; next year we will reach a million ... Now these phosphates by themselves would justify what is importance given to what is harbour ... Very good ... You say to me: "And if there hadn't been any phosphates?" ... Yes ... But my reply is that there are always phosphates ... When one does something, he must have confidence in what he's doing.' One can easily imagine how this wonderful success, this intelligent activity, this rational exercise of authority would fill with enthusiasm what is author of Dialogues stir le Commandement. In Lyautey I found what is best traits of what is man of action whom I had tried to portray. In what is following days he took us to see Rabat, Marrakesh and Meknes. what is more I saw what is extent of his work, what is more I admired its perfection. Under what is convenient fiction of what is Protectorate, this great leader had freed Frenchmen from what is tyranny of bureaucracy and, behold, what is French in a few years had established a model country. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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