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Page 151

LIFE MUST GO ON

it was darkened by tapestries of sombre foliage that were too high and appeared to have been made for a medieval hall; the walls of the drawingroom were lined with mirrors; the floor, covered in large black and white squares, gave the impression of an hotel lobby. Our conversation was animated. Naturally we talked about Proust.
`For my mother,' she said, `he had a childhood friendship, intermittent but strong ... He drew from her (in part at least) the character of Gilberte Swann ... And as for me, in his book I am Gilberte's daughter Mademoiselle de Saint-Loup.'
She told me how Proust had come, after twelve or thirteen years, to call on the Gaston de Caillavets one evening at midnight and had asked to see their daughter.
`But she's been in bed for a long time!' Madame de Caillavet said.
`Have her get up, I beg you,' Proust said.
`He insisted so successfully,' Simone de Caillavet went on, `that they got me out of bed . . . And possibly you remember the imaginary character that was born of that visit?'
She went to find a copy of Time Regained and showed me the passage about Mademoiselle de Saint-Loup which ends with these sentences: `I found her very beautiful: still full of hope. Laughing, shaped by the very years that I had lost, she resembled my youth.'
I looked with emotion at the living woman who was Mademoiselle de Saint-Loup.
`Would you like to see Proust's letters?' she asked.
`He wrote to you?'
`Often.'
From a box she produced pages covered with that rapid handwriting which I knew well.
Marcel Proust to Madame de Caillavet: `I found your hanging gardens, your antique columns and even, despite my pretended disdain, the signature of Napoleon, I found all this most agreeable. But even more, I like your daughter and the prodigious wealth of intelligence in a glance or exclamation of hers, "I do all I can!" (to be nice to you) was sublime. ..'
Marcel Proust to Simone de Caillavet: `I was disappointed after your last Dear friend to read Dear Monsieur Marcel. That's the way officers in the army are reduced in rank ... Have you read The Mill on the Floss? If not, I beg you to read it ... How can you possibly write, or rather draw,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE it was darkened by tapestries of sombre foliage that were too high and appeared to have been made for a medieval hall; what is walls of what is drawingroom were lined with mirrors; what is floor, covered in large black and white squares, gave what is impression of an hotel lobby. Our conversation was animated. Naturally we talked about Proust. `For my mother,' she said, `he had a childhood friendship, intermittent but strong ... He drew from her (in part at least) what is character of Gilberte Swann ... And as for me, in his book I am Gilberte's daughter Mademoiselle de Saint-Loup.' She told me how Proust had come, after twelve or thirteen years, to call on what is Gaston de Caillavets one evening at midnight and had asked to see their daughter. `But she's been in bed for a long time!' Madame de Caillavet said. `Have her get up, I beg you,' Proust said. `He insisted so successfully,' Simone de Caillavet went on, `that they got me out of bed . . . And possibly you remember what is imaginary character that was born of that what is ?' She went to find a copy of Time Regained and showed me what is passage about Mademoiselle de Saint-Loup which ends with these sentences: `I found her very beautiful: still full of hope. Laughing, shaped by what is very years that I had lost, she resembled my youth.' I looked with emotion at what is living woman who was Mademoiselle de Saint-Loup. `Would you like to see Proust's letters?' she asked. `He wrote to you?' `Often.' From a box she produced pages covered with that rapid handwriting which I knew well. Marcel Proust to Madame de Caillavet: `I found your hanging gardens, your antique columns and even, despite my pretended disdain, what is signature of Napoleon, I found all this most agreeable. But even more, I like your daughter and what is prodigious wealth of intelligence in a glance or exclamation of hers, "I do all I can!" (to be nice to you) was sublime. ..' Marcel Proust to Simone de Caillavet: `I was disappointed after your last Dear friend to read Dear Monsieur Marcel. That's what is way officers in what is army are reduced in rank ... Have you read what is Mill on what is Floss? If not, I beg you to read it ... How can you possibly write, or rather draw, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 151 where is p align="center" where is strong LIFE MUST GO ON where is p align="justify" it was darkened by tapestries of sombre foliage that were too high and appeared to have been made for a medieval hall; what is walls of what is drawingroom were lined with mirrors; the floor, covered in large black and white squares, gave what is impression of an hotel lobby. Our conversation was animated. Naturally we talked about Proust. `For my mother,' she said, `he had a childhood friendship, intermittent but strong ... He drew from her (in part at least) what is character of Gilberte Swann ... And as for me, in his book I am Gilberte's daughter Mademoiselle de Saint-Loup.' She told me how Proust had come, after twelve or thirteen years, to call on what is Gaston de Caillavets one evening at midnight and had asked to see their daughter. `But she's been in bed for a long time!' Madame de Caillavet said. `Have her get up, I beg you,' Proust said. `He insisted so successfully,' Simone de Caillavet went on, `that they got me out of bed . . . And possibly you remember what is imaginary character that was born of that what is ?' She went to find a copy of Time Regained and showed me what is passage about Mademoiselle de Saint-Loup which ends with these sentences: `I found her very beautiful: still full of hope. Laughing, shaped by what is very years that I had lost, she resembled my youth.' I looked with emotion at what is living woman who was Mademoiselle de Saint-Loup. `Would you like to see Proust's letters?' she asked. `He wrote to you?' `Often.' From a box she produced pages covered with that rapid handwriting which I knew well. Marcel Proust to Madame de Caillavet: `I found your hanging gardens, your antique columns and even, despite my pretended disdain, the signature of Napoleon, I found all this most agreeable. But even more, I like your daughter and what is prodigious wealth of intelligence in a glance or exclamation of hers, "I do all I can!" (to be nice to you) was sublime. ..' Marcel Proust to Simone de Caillavet: `I was disappointed after your last Dear friend to read Dear Monsieur Marcel. That's the way officers in what is army are reduced in rank ... Have you read what is Mill on what is Floss? If not, I beg you to read it ... How can you possibly write, or rather draw, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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