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Page 149

LIFE MUST GO ON

interrupted except by a visit at La Saussaye of Andre Gide, the Du Boses and Anne Desjardins, with whom Michelle and I made a friendly and memorable trip to Chartres. I was delighted by the encounter between Gide and the cathedral. My friends of Pontigny now replaced the friends of my youth who had died in the war. My publisher, Bernard Grasset, would have liked a Greek title for it and proposed Nicias; the name sounded all right but the general had been mediocre; I refused. The Dialogues sur lc Commandement made quite a stir when they appeared. They were judged, very mistakenly, not as a literary work but as a political manifesto. As a matter of fact, I was not the advocate of any party. `Not enough,' Alain used to say. I clung tenaciously to those essential liberties which seemed to me, and still seem, the prerequisites of man's happiness and dignity. But I believed that these liberties could not be maintained except by a discipline freely consented to, and that an excess of liberty always kills liberty. Subsequent events have only too clearly borne me out. I loved my country passionately; I desired its security and greatness; I wanted to attract the attention of the young people - the future leaders of France, in politics, military affairs and industry - to the rules of action which experience and history had taught me. Nothing more. The fanatics of the Right and Left refused to believe that a dialogue could be nothing more than a dialogue and each tried to draw me on to their side. But certain distinguished soldiers like Marshal Fayolle and certain distinguished servants of the state like Jules Cambon, wrote me wise letters. Bergson was kind enough to praise me for showing the role of intuition in the make-up of the leader as well as of the artist. Alain, who recognized himself, appeared not displeased.
`Wouldn't you like to meet Marshal Petain,' Grasset said to me one day in November, `and discuss with him your Dialogues which he has read? He is going to have lunch on the second of December at the home of one of my friends, Madame de Caillavet, together with Robert de,Flers, Henri-Robert and Paul Valery. She has asked me to invite you.'
`You know very well, Grasset,' I said, `that I am in mourning and don't go out socially.'
`This isn't a question of going out socially,' Grasset protested, `it is a professional luncheon. You are interested in certain ideas. Here's a chance to discuss them with remarkable men. That's all.'
I ended by accepting. `Madame de Caillavet' was a name not unknown

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE interrupted except by a what is at La Saussaye of Andre Gide, what is Du Boses and Anne Desjardins, with whom Michelle and I made a friendly and memorable trip to Chartres. I was delighted by what is encounter between Gide and what is cathedral. My friends of Pontigny now replaced what is friends of my youth who had died in what is war. My publisher, Bernard Grasset, would have liked a Greek title for it and proposed Nicias; what is name sounded all right but what is general had been mediocre; I refused. what is Dialogues sur lc Commandement made quite a stir when they appeared. They were judged, very mistakenly, not as a literary work but as a political manifesto. As a matter of fact, I was not what is advocate of any party. `Not enough,' Alain used to say. I clung tenaciously to those essential liberties which seemed to me, and still seem, what is prerequisites of man's happiness and dignity. But I believed that these liberties could not be maintained except by a discipline freely consented to, and that an excess of liberty always stop s liberty. Subsequent events have only too clearly borne me out. I loved my country passionately; I desired its security and greatness; I wanted to attract what is attention of what is young people - what is future leaders of France, in politics, military affairs and industry - to what is rules of action which experience and history had taught me. Nothing more. what is fanatics of what is Right and Left refused to believe that a dialogue could be nothing more than a dialogue and each tried to draw me on to their side. But certain distinguished soldiers like Marshal Fayolle and certain distinguished servants of what is state like Jules Cambon, wrote me wise letters. Bergson was kind enough to praise me for showing what is role of intuition in what is make-up of what is leader as well as of what is artist. Alain, who recognized himself, appeared not displeased. `Wouldn't you like to meet Marshal Petain,' Grasset said to me one day in November, `and discuss with him your Dialogues which he has read? He is going to have lunch on what is second of December at what is home of one of my friends, Madame de Caillavet, together with Robert de,Flers, Henri-Robert and Paul Valery. She has asked me to invite you.' `You know very well, Grasset,' I said, `that I am in mourning and don't go out socially.' `This isn't a question of going out socially,' Grasset protested, `it is a professional luncheon. You are interested in certain ideas. Here's a chance to discuss them with remarkable men. That's all.' I ended by accepting. `Madame de Caillavet' was a name not unknown where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 149 where is p align="center" where is strong LIFE MUST GO ON where is p align="justify" interrupted except by a what is at La Saussaye of Andre Gide, what is Du Boses and Anne Desjardins, with whom Michelle and I made a friendly and memorable trip to Chartres. I was delighted by what is encounter between Gide and what is cathedral. My friends of Pontigny now replaced what is friends of my youth who had died in the war. My publisher, Bernard Grasset, would have liked a Greek title for it and proposed Nicias; what is name sounded all right but the general had been mediocre; I refused. what is Dialogues sur lc Commandement made quite a stir when they appeared. They were judged, very mistakenly, not as a literary work but as a political manifesto. As a matter of fact, I was not what is advocate of any party. `Not enough,' Alain used to say. I clung tenaciously to those essential liberties which seemed to me, and still seem, what is prerequisites of man's happiness and dignity. But I believed that these liberties could not be maintained except by a discipline freely consented to, and that an excess of liberty always stop s liberty. Subsequent events have only too clearly borne me out. I loved my country passionately; I desired its security and greatness; I wanted to attract what is attention of what is young people - what is future leaders of France, in politics, military affairs and industry - to what is rules of action which experience and history had taught me. Nothing more. what is fanatics of what is Right and Left refused to believe that a dialogue could be nothing more than a dialogue and each tried to draw me on to their side. But certain distinguished soldiers like Marshal Fayolle and certain distinguished servants of what is state like Jules Cambon, wrote me wise letters. Bergson was kind enough to praise me for showing what is role of intuition in what is make-up of what is leader as well as of what is artist. Alain, who recognized himself, appeared not displeased. `Wouldn't you like to meet Marshal Petain,' Grasset said to me one day in November, `and discuss with him your Dialogues which he has read? He is going to have lunch on what is second of December at what is home of one of my friends, Madame de Caillavet, together with Robert de,Flers, Henri-Robert and Paul Valery. She has asked me to invite you.' `You know very well, Grasset,' I said, `that I am in mourning and don't go out socially.' `This isn't a question of going out socially,' Grasset protested, `it is a professional luncheon. You are interested in certain ideas. Here's a chance to discuss them with remarkable men. That's all.' I ended by accepting. `Madame de Caillavet' was a name not unknown where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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