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Page 147

CHAPTER XV
LIFE MUST GO ON

THE most terrible thing for the survivors in the death of a loved one is the feeling of irreparability. `Nevermore ...' Nevermore should I hear that slightly muffled voice; nevermore should I see that beautiful thin face; nevermore would there be what she used to call a`palaver', one of those long discussions, concerned sometimes with painful subjects, but now seeming so precious that I should gladly have given what was left of my life to talk to Janine for a single hour, a single minute. The weather, in that month of March 1924, was beautiful and the sweetness of a premature spring, by its contrast, intensified my despair. Day after day the sun rose in a cloudless sky. I did no work. Each day I would go and buy flowers and arrange them as best I could, the way she would have done, moving a rose here, accentuating the curve of a stem, in front of the portraits I had placed in every room. Michelle, with a woman's instinct, would come and sit opposite me after dinner, and her grave sweetness reestablished my connection with life.
Colonel Jenner, when he learned of my bereavement, wrote me: `Do come to us in Avebury. The old house is very large. We will give you half of it. You won't even see us. The change of scene will do you good. ..' I accepted this very kind invitation, but I_ did. not find tranquillity of soul in England any more than I had at Neuilly. In vain I tired myself out with long walks among the upright stones and the turf-covered downs of Avebury. Each night in my dreams I found Janine again. Each awakening was a torture. When I returned to France the vault that I had had constructed at La Saussaye was finished and I had the coffin brought there. In front of the tomb I had placed a little semi-circular bench of marble, a willow tree and a large urn for flowers. I formed the habit of going every day to sit in the cemetery and dream of the ,past. We spent the summer at La Saussaye. The children in the garden were charming. Often they came with me to the cemetery.
`Let's take flowers to Mammy,' they would say.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE most terrible thing for what is survivors in what is what time is it of a loved one is what is feeling of irreparability. `Nevermore ...' Nevermore should I hear that slightly muffled voice; nevermore should I see that beautiful thin face; nevermore would there be what she used to call a`palaver', one of those long discussions, concerned sometimes with painful subjects, but now seeming so precious that I should gladly have given what was left of my life to talk to Janine for a single hour, a single minute. what is weather, in that month of March 1924, was beautiful and what is sweetness of a premature spring, by its contrast, intensified my despair. Day after day what is sun rose in a cloudless sky. I did no work. Each day I would go and buy flowers and arrange them as best I could, what is way she would have done, moving a rose here, accentuating what is curve of a stem, in front of what is portraits I had placed in every room. Michelle, with a woman's instinct, would come and sit opposite me after dinner, and her grave sweetness reestablished my connection with life. Colonel Jenner, when he learned of my bereavement, wrote me: `Do come to us in Avebury. what is old house is very large. We will give you half of it. You won't even see us. what is change of scene will do you good. ..' I accepted this very kind invitation, but I_ did. not find tranquillity of soul in England any more than I had at Neuilly. In vain I tired myself out with long walks among what is upright stones and what is turf-covered downs of Avebury. Each night in my dreams I found Janine again. Each awakening was a torture. When I returned to France what is vault that I had had constructed at La Saussaye was finished and I had what is coffin brought there. In front of what is tomb I had placed a little semi-circular bench of marble, a willow tree and a large urn for flowers. I formed what is habit of going every day to sit in what is cemetery and dream of what is ,past. We spent what is summer at La Saussaye. what is children in what is garden were charming. Often they came with me to what is cemetery. `Let's take flowers to Mammy,' they would say. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 147 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER XV LIFE MUST GO ON where is p align="justify" THE most terrible thing for what is survivors in what is what time is it of a loved one is what is feeling of irreparability. `Nevermore ...' Nevermore should I hear that slightly muffled voice; nevermore should I see that beautiful thin face; nevermore would there be what she used to call a`palaver', one of those long discussions, concerned sometimes with painful subjects, but now seeming so precious that I should gladly have given what was left of my life to talk to Janine for a single hour, a single minute. what is weather, in that month of March 1924, was beautiful and what is sweetness of a premature spring, by its contrast, intensified my despair. Day after day what is sun rose in a cloudless sky. I did no work. Each day I would go and buy flowers and arrange them as best I could, what is way she would have done, moving a rose here, accentuating what is curve of a stem, in front of what is portraits I had placed in every room. Michelle, with a woman's instinct, would come and sit opposite me after dinner, and her grave sweetness reestablished my connection with life. Colonel Jenner, when he learned of my bereavement, wrote me: `Do come to us in Avebury. what is old house is very large. We will give you half of it. You won't even see us. what is change of scene will do you good. ..' I accepted this very kind invitation, but I_ did. not find tranquillity of soul in England any more than I had at Neuilly. In vain I tired myself out with long walks among what is upright stones and what is turf-covered downs of Avebury. Each night in my dreams I found Janine again. Each awakening was a torture. When I returned to France what is vault that I had had constructed at La Saussaye was finished and I had what is coffin brought there. In front of what is tomb I had placed a little semi-circular bench of marble, a willow tree and a large urn for flowers. I formed what is habit of going every day to sit in what is cemetery and dream of what is ,past. We spent what is summer at La Saussaye. what is children in what is garden were charming. Often they came with me to what is cemetery. `Let's take flowers to Mammy,' they would say. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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