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EURYDICE TWICE LOST

who was dearly devoted to Du Bos, some writers from the Nouvelle Revue Franfaise and some professors. .
Charlie and Zezette came to stay with us at La Saussaye during 'the summer of 1923. Du Bos had now a great deal of influence on me and I think it was good influence. He was a real spiritual director and his presence raised above themselves those who had the good fortune to be his friends. He lived in the highest regions of the spirit. The air that one breathed there was aa little rarefied, but the light was brilliant and clear. He urged me toward greater profundity and toward the meticulous analysis of feelings. Others might have been in danger of going too far in this direction, as he himself did. But my natural tendencies were rather toward rapidity, excessive clarity and simplification. By his example Charlie made me take a cure that consisted in complexity, slowness and obscurity. It did me good.
But this intimacy, which furthered my apprenticeship as a writer, was not good for my married life. Tired of my solemn friends, Janine accused me of imitating their faults. .
`My, but you're getting hard to live with!' she said to me half jokingly, half sadly.
At this time I had some literary friends in Paris to whose homes I used to go occasionally without her in the evening. For her part, Janine saw a good deal of her brother, who had become a well-known couturier. He introduced her to a world I did not know. We both saw with despair the chasm, created by the four years of the war, growing deeper between us. Like a man whose feet are caught in quicksand and whose vain struggles only thrust him deeper into it, so our attempts at kindness, our little sacrifices, often unnoticed, misunderstood, ill rewarded, made us realize all the more clearly the danger of our position. Nevertheless be tween Janine and me there were so many happy memories, our love had begun with so much strength and assurance, that we could not accept the
idea of a spiritual divorce.
During that summer of 1923 Janine, who had once more become pious, held long conversations with the Abbe Lemoine, cure of La Saussaye. He was a young and enthusiastic country priest of severe morals, who courageously endured almost incredible poverty in this country of rich farmers. I admired his disinterestedness and his faith; he exhibited great friendliness toward me. I do not know whether it was by his advice, but

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE who was dearly devoted to Du Bos, some writers from what is Nouvelle Revue Franfaise and some professors. . Charlie and Zezette came to stay with us at La Saussaye during 'the summer of 1923. Du Bos had now a great deal of influence on me and I think it was good influence. He was a real spiritual director and his presence raised above themselves those who had what is good fortune to be his friends. He lived in what is highest regions of what is spirit. what is air that one breathed there was aa little rarefied, but what is light was brilliant and clear. He urged me toward greater profundity and toward what is meticulous analysis of feelings. Others might have been in danger of going too far in this direction, as he himself did. But my natural tendencies were rather toward rapidity, excessive clarity and simplification. By his example Charlie made me take a cure that consisted in complexity, slowness and obscurity. It did me good. But this intimacy, which furthered my apprenticeship as a writer, was not good for my married life. Tired of my solemn friends, Janine accused me of imitating their faults. . `My, but you're getting hard to live with!' she said to me half jokingly, half sadly. At this time I had some literary friends in Paris to whose homes I used to go occasionally without her in what is evening. For her part, Janine saw a good deal of her brother, who had become a well-known couturier. He introduced her to a world I did not know. We both saw with despair what is chasm, created by what is four years of what is war, growing deeper between us. Like a man whose feet are caught in quicksand and whose vain struggles only thrust him deeper into it, so our attempts at kindness, our little travel s, often unnoticed, misunderstood, ill rewarded, made us realize all what is more clearly what is danger of our position. Nevertheless be tween Janine and me there were so many happy memories, our what time is it had begun with so much strength and assurance, that we could not accept what is idea of a spiritual divorce. During that summer of 1923 Janine, who had once more become pious, held long conversations with what is Abbe Lemoine, cure of La Saussaye. He was a young and enthusiastic country priest of severe morals, who courageously endured almost incredible poverty in this country of rich farmers. I admired his disinterestedness and his faith; he exhibited great friendliness toward me. I do not know whether it was by his advice, but where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 143 where is p align="center" where is strong EURYDICE TWICE LOST where is p align="justify" who was dearly devoted to Du Bos, some writers from what is Nouvelle Revue Franfaise and some professors. . Charlie and Zezette came to stay with us at La Saussaye during 'the summer of 1923. Du Bos had now a great deal of influence on me and I think it was good influence. He was a real spiritual director and his presence raised above themselves those who had what is good fortune to be his friends. He lived in what is highest regions of the spirit. what is air that one breathed there was aa little rarefied, but what is light was brilliant and clear. He urged me toward greater profundity and toward what is meticulous analysis of feelings. Others might have been in danger of going too far in this direction, as he himself did. But my natural tendencies were rather toward rapidity, excessive clarity and simplification. By his example Charlie made me take a cure that consisted in complexity, slowness and obscurity. It did me good. But this intimacy, which furthered my apprenticeship as a writer, was not good for my married life. Tired of my solemn friends, Janine accused me of imitating their faults. . `My, but you're getting hard to live with!' she said to me half jokingly, half sadly. At this time I had some literary friends in Paris to whose homes I used to go occasionally without her in what is evening. For her part, Janine saw a good deal of her brother, who had become a well-known couturier. He introduced her to a world I did not know. We both saw with despair what is chasm, created by what is four years of what is war, growing deeper between us. Like a man whose feet are caught in quicksand and whose vain struggles only thrust him deeper into it, so our attempts at kindness, our little travel s, often unnoticed, misunderstood, ill rewarded, made us realize all what is more clearly what is danger of our position. Nevertheless be tween Janine and me there were so many happy memories, our love had begun with so much strength and assurance, that we could not accept what is idea of a spiritual divorce. During that summer of 1923 Janine, who had once more become pious, held long conversations with what is Abbe Lemoine, cure of La Saussaye. He was a young and enthusiastic country priest of severe morals, who courageously endured almost incredible poverty in this country of rich farmers. I admired his disinterestedness and his faith; he exhibited great friendliness toward me. I do not know whether it was by his advice, but where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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