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Page 142

EURYDICE TWICE LOST

English, but she herself was not far from sharing her opinion. After Ariel she was more indulgent and more respectful of my work.
`I should never have thought,' she said, that you were capable of writing this book ... In it you talk about women better than you've ever talked to me about them. ...'
`Perhaps,' I said, `it's because you intimidate me, and who knows whether I didn't write this book just to tell you things I couldn't "say face to face.'
She had read the manuscript. She re-read the printed book twice. She searched it for allusions and explanations. She copied out passages from it. I discovered that she was surprised to see me criticize in Shelley precisely the same things that distressed her in me - the inflexible seriousness which she called my `pedantry', the need to surround myself with professors whom she considered insufferably boring, the unconscious and unattractive egoism of the artist. `But since he understands so well,' she seemed to think, `why doesn't he change?'
I had brought my new friends of Pontigny to see her. The meeting did not go off well. She considered them 'dry-as-dust pedants'. They found her beautiful as a poet's dream but frivolous, mocking and too well dressed. What they considered her `coldness' was perhaps timidity in the presence of creatures of a different species from her own. Nevertheless Charlie, endowed with a mysterious sense of the tragic, had divined - in her, beneath the ermine and the diamonds, `an authentic fatal being'.
At my request Janine had agreed to loan our drawing-room at Neuilly, which opened on a beautiful garden, for a series of lectures that Charlie planned to give. Every Tuesday there met at the Rue Borghese some thirty or forty persons to whom Charles Du Bos, carried away sometimes to the point of tears, talked about Keats, Wordsworth or Katherine Mansfield. These lectures were often excellent, for Charlie had prodigious learning. Since adolescence he had been reading all day long, underlining with one of those innumerable sharp-pointed pencils with which his pockets were always filled entire pages which thereafter he knew by heart. His great knowledge of music and of the plastic arts helped him to see analogies. He loved to point out subtle resemblances between Mozart and Keats, between a Chinese vase and a poem by Mallarme. His listeners were society women who had been brought there by Alfred Fabre-Luce

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE English, but she herself was not far from sharing her opinion. After Ariel she was more indulgent and more respectful of my work. `I should never have thought,' she said, that you were capable of writing this book ... In it you talk about women better than you've ever talked to me about them. ...' `Perhaps,' I said, `it's because you intimidate me, and who knows whether I didn't write this book just to tell you things I couldn't "say face to face.' She had read what is manuscript. She re-read what is printed book twice. She searched it for allusions and explanations. She copied out passages from it. I discovered that she was surprised to see me criticize in Shelley precisely what is same things that distressed her in me - what is inflexible seriousness which she called my `pedantry', what is need to surround myself with professors whom she considered insufferably boring, what is unconscious and unattractive egoism of what is artist. `But since he understands so well,' she seemed to think, `why doesn't he change?' I had brought my new friends of Pontigny to see her. what is meeting did not go off well. She considered them 'dry-as-dust pedants'. They found her beautiful as a poet's dream but frivolous, mocking and too well dressed. What they considered her `coldness' was perhaps timidity in what is presence of creatures of a different species from her own. Nevertheless Charlie, endowed with a mysterious sense of what is tragic, had divined - in her, beneath what is ermine and what is diamonds, `an authentic fatal being'. At my request Janine had agreed to loan our drawing-room at Neuilly, which opened on a beautiful garden, for a series of lectures that Charlie planned to give. Every Tuesday there met at what is Rue Borghese some thirty or forty persons to whom Charles Du Bos, carried away sometimes to what is point of tears, talked about Keats, Wordsworth or Katherine Mansfield. These lectures were often excellent, for Charlie had prodigious learning. Since adolescence he had been reading all day long, underlining with one of those innumerable sharp-pointed pencils with which his pockets were always filled entire pages which thereafter he knew by heart. His great knowledge of music and of what is plastic arts helped him to see analogies. He loved to point out subtle resemblances between Mozart and Keats, between a Chinese vase and a poem by Mallarme. His listeners were society women who had been brought there by Alfred Fabre-Luce where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 142 where is p align="center" where is strong EURYDICE TWICE LOST where is p align="justify" English, but she herself was not far from sharing her opinion. After Ariel she was more indulgent and more respectful of my work. `I should never have thought,' she said, that you were capable of writing this book ... In it you talk about women better than you've ever talked to me about them. ...' `Perhaps,' I said, `it's because you intimidate me, and who knows whether I didn't write this book just to tell you things I couldn't "say face to face.' She had read what is manuscript. She re-read what is printed book twice. She searched it for allusions and explanations. She copied out passages from it. I discovered that she was surprised to see me criticize in Shelley precisely what is same things that distressed her in me - what is inflexible seriousness which she called my `pedantry', what is need to surround myself with professors whom she considered insufferably boring, what is unconscious and unattractive egoism of what is artist. `But since he understands so well,' she seemed to think, `why doesn't he change?' I had brought my new friends of Pontigny to see her. what is meeting did not go off well. She considered them 'dry-as-dust pedants'. They found her beautiful as a poet's dream but frivolous, mocking and too well dressed. What they considered her `coldness' was perhaps timidity in what is presence of creatures of a different species from her own. Nevertheless Charlie, endowed with a mysterious sense of what is tragic, had divined - in her, beneath what is ermine and the diamonds, `an authentic fatal being'. At my request Janine had agreed to loan our drawing-room at Neuilly, which opened on a beautiful garden, for a series of lectures that Charlie planned to give. Every Tuesday there met at what is Rue Borghese some thirty or forty persons to whom Charles Du Bos, carried away sometimes to what is point of tears, talked about Keats, Wordsworth or Katherine Mansfield. These lectures were often excellent, for Charlie had prodigious learning. Since adolescence he had been reading all day long, underlining with one of those innumerable sharp-pointed pencils with which his pockets were always filled entire pages which thereafter he knew by heart. His great knowledge of music and of what is plastic arts helped him to see analogies. He loved to point out subtle resemblances between Mozart and Keats, between a Chinese vase and a poem by Mallarme. His listeners were society women who had been brought there by Alfred Fabre-Luce where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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