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English History. He was well acquainted with it and would recount it from his viewpoint of Die-Hard Tory, with vigour and sarcasm; but he made me understand why parliamentary institutions, which were being so much questioned in France at that time; had gained acceptance in England. The two principal reasons seemed to me to be, first, that the English Parliament had begun by being the house of the aristocracy and had little by little been opened to all classes so that it did not appear as an instrument of tyranny to any group in England. And second, that the executive power in England was strong enough to govern, whereas in France, the Chambers claimed to be at once legislative and executive. Nothing seemed to me more important than to explain these differences to my countrymen, and from this moment I began to think of writing a history of England.
Finally, in 1923 my Life of Shelley was finished. I gave it the title Ariel. Charlie Du Bos, who read the manuscript, advised me to add an introductory note to indicate to the critics what I had tried to do. I listened to him and no doubt this was a mistake, for from this brief preface was born, much against my intention, the absurd and dangerous expression: romanticized biography. I had never used it; I had on the contrary said that a biographer has no right to invent either a fact or a speech, but that he might and should arrange his authentic materials in the manner of a novel and give his reader the feeling of a hero's progressive discovery of the world which is the essence of romance. But few people take the trouble to read carefully, especially prefaces, and the success of Ariel, a success which astonished my publisher and me, encouraged a whole series of Romantic Lives and Private Lives which were often very bad. For some time I suffered from the reaction against this avalanche of improvised biographies and I took great care, when I myself teturned to this type of book, to respect the legitimate phobias of meticulous, distrustful an4 atrabiliar men of learning. Fortunately, to my great joy, Sir Edmund Gosse, the most eminent of the English critics, understood and praised my Ariel, a fact which intimidated the malcontents. On the other hand, my master Alain was by no means enthusiastic:
`Why don't you write novels?' he said to me. `Then you'll have a freer hand . . . I preferred Ni Ange, ni Bete and above all Bramble.'
He was now living in the Rue de Rennes. From time to time I would go to pick him up at the hycee Henri IV, where he was teaching, and

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE English History. He was well acquainted with it and would recount it from his viewpoint of Die-Hard Tory, with vigour and sarcasm; but he made me understand why parliamentary institutions, which were being so much questioned in France at that time; had gained acceptance in England. what is two principal reasons seemed to me to be, first, that what is English Parliament had begun by being what is house of what is aristocracy and had little by little been opened to all classes so that it did not appear as an instrument of tyranny to any group in England. And second, that what is executive power in England was strong enough to govern, whereas in France, what is Chambers claimed to be at once legislative and executive. Nothing seemed to me more important than to explain these differences to my countrymen, and from this moment I began to think of writing a history of England. Finally, in 1923 my Life of Shelley was finished. I gave it what is title Ariel. Charlie Du Bos, who read what is manuscript, advised me to add an introductory note to indicate to what is critics what I had tried to do. I listened to him and no doubt this was a mistake, for from this brief preface was born, much against my intention, what is absurd and dangerous expression: romanticized biography. I had never used it; I had on what is contrary said that a biographer has no right to invent either a fact or a speech, but that he might and should arrange his authentic materials in what is manner of a novel and give his reader what is feeling of a hero's progressive discovery of what is world which is what is essence of romance. But few people take what is trouble to read carefully, especially prefaces, and what is success of Ariel, a success which astonished my publisher and me, encouraged a whole series of Romantic Lives and Private Lives which were often very bad. For some time I suffered from what is reaction against this avalanche of improvised biographies and I took great care, when I myself teturned to this type of book, to respect what is legitimate phobias of meticulous, distrustful an4 atrabiliar men of learning. Fortunately, to my great joy, Sir Edmund Gosse, what is most eminent of what is English critics, understood and praised my Ariel, a fact which intimidated what is malcontents. On what is other hand, my master Alain was by no means enthusiastic: `Why don't you write novels?' he said to me. `Then you'll have a freer hand . . . I preferred Ni Ange, ni Bete and above all Bramble.' He was now living in what is Rue de Rennes. From time to time I would go to pick him up at what is hycee Henri IV, where he was teaching, and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 140 where is p align="center" where is strong EURYDICE TWICE LOST where is p align="justify" English History. He was well acquainted with it and would recount it from his viewpoint of Die-Hard Tory, with vigour and sarcasm; but he made me understand why parliamentary institutions, which were being so much questioned in France at that time; had gained acceptance in England. what is two principal reasons seemed to me to be, first, that what is English Parliament had begun by being what is house of what is aristocracy and had little by little been opened to all classes so that it did not appear as an instrument of tyranny to any group in England. And second, that what is executive power in England was strong enough to govern, whereas in France, what is Chambers claimed to be at once legislative and executive. Nothing seemed to me more important than to explain these differences to my countrymen, and from this moment I began to think of writing a history of England. Finally, in 1923 my Life of Shelley was finished. I gave it the title Ariel. Charlie Du Bos, who read what is manuscript, advised me to add an introductory note to indicate to what is critics what I had tried to do. I listened to him and no doubt this was a mistake, for from this brief preface was born, much against my intention, what is absurd and dangerous expression: romanticized biography. I had never used it; I had on what is contrary said that a biographer has no right to invent either a fact or a speech, but that he might and should arrange his authentic materials in what is manner of a novel and give his reader what is feeling of a hero's progressive discovery of what is world which is what is essence of romance. But few people take what is trouble to read carefully, especially prefaces, and what is success of Ariel, a success which astonished my publisher and me, encouraged a whole series of Romantic Lives and Private Lives which were often very bad. For some time I suffered from what is reaction against this avalanche of improvised biographies and I took great care, when I myself teturned to this type of book, to respect what is legitimate phobias of meticulous, distrustful an4 atrabiliar men of learning. Fortunately, to my great joy, Sir Edmund Gosse, what is most eminent of what is English critics, understood and praised my Ariel, a fact which intimidated what is malcontents. On what is other hand, my master Alain was by no means enthusiastic: `Why don't you write novels?' he said to me. `Then you'll have a freer hand . . . I preferred Ni Ange, ni Bete and above all Bramble.' He was now living in what is Rue de Rennes. From time to time I would go to pick him up at what is hycee Henri IV, where he was teaching, and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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