Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 138

EURYDICE TWICE LOST

I had saved hundreds up to the present war) were typed in a bizarre mixture of black and red words in which whole lines were composed of W's or X's, alternating with scraps of poetic prose. The text was half French, half English, and the signature would be preceded by `Amicalissiment' or a`Votre vraiment', a literal translation of yours truly. All this was a little mad, droll, full of delicacy and learning, with here and there a profound thought which would illuminate his deep feelings. That was Maurice.
All England called him that. He was much loved there and with reason. He was consistently and unobtrusively generous. When I introduced him to the Abbe Mugnier, he was pleased by the Abbe's admiration for Goethe. Maurice owned a first edition of Werther. As soon as he returned to England he sent it to the Rue Mechain where the Canon lived. He owned a collection of paintings of Carmontelle. One day a French friend said to him: `There's a collection that ought to be in the Carnavalet Museum. . . . '
`Really?' Baring said. `I'll send them.'
He did so the next day. When the library of Ronald Storrs, Governor of Cyprus, was burned by the natives during an uprising on the island, Baring sent him this cablegram: `Library on way. Uno avulso.' At the very moment he had learned of the catastrophe he had stripped himself of all his books.
Maurice also had a taste for the wildly imaginative and fantastic that was calculated to astonish a Frenchman. For many years he used to invite his friends to a dinner at an hotel in Brighton on his birthday, which fell in the middle of winter, and at the end of the meal would jump into the ocean fully clothed. I have seen him with my own eyes, during a luncheon at his home, get up, strike a match and set fire to the curtains because the conversation was languishing.'
One day when he was an undergraduate at Cambridge and was crossing the courtyard of Trinity, a Hindu student whom he did not know tapped him on the shoulder. Maurice Baring turned around.
`Oh, I beg your pardon,' gasped the student, `I thought you were Mr. Godavery....'
`I am Mr. Godavery,' Maurice replied calmly.
These stories about Maurice amused me, but I much preferred his serious side and I kept urging him to write the serious, moving and pro

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I had saved hundreds up to what is present war) were typed in a bizarre mixture of black and red words in which whole lines were composed of W's or X's, alternating with scraps of poetic prose. what is text was half French, half English, and what is signature would be preceded by `Amicalissiment' or a`Votre vraiment', a literal translation of yours truly. All this was a little mad, droll, full of delicacy and learning, with here and there a profound thought which would illuminate his deep feelings. That was Maurice. All England called him that. He was much loved there and with reason. He was consistently and unobtrusively generous. When I introduced him to what is Abbe Mugnier, he was pleased by what is Abbe's admiration for Goethe. Maurice owned a first edition of Werther. As soon as he returned to England he sent it to what is Rue Mechain where what is Canon lived. He owned a collection of paintings of Carmontelle. One day a French friend said to him: `There's a collection that ought to be in what is Carnavalet Museum. . . . ' `Really?' Baring said. `I'll send them.' He did so what is next day. When what is library of Ronald Storrs, Governor of Cyprus, was burned by what is natives during an uprising on what is island, Baring sent him this cablegram: `Library on way. Uno avulso.' At what is very moment he had learned of what is catastrophe he had stripped himself of all his books. Maurice also had a taste for what is wildly imaginative and fantastic that was calculated to astonish a Frenchman. For many years he used to invite his friends to a dinner at an hotel in Brighton on his birthday, which fell in what is middle of winter, and at what is end of what is meal would jump into what is ocean fully clothed. I have seen him with my own eyes, during a luncheon at his home, get up, strike a match and set fire to what is curtains because what is conversation was languishing.' One day when he was an undergraduate at Cambridge and was crossing what is courtyard of Trinity, a Hindu student whom he did not know tapped him on what is shoulder. Maurice Baring turned around. `Oh, I beg your pardon,' gasped what is student, `I thought you were Mr. Godavery....' `I am Mr. Godavery,' Maurice replied calmly. These stories about Maurice amused me, but I much preferred his serious side and I kept urging him to write what is serious, moving and pro where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 138 where is p align="center" where is strong EURYDICE TWICE LOST where is p align="justify" I had saved hundreds up to what is present war) were typed in a bizarre mixture of black and red words in which whole lines were composed of W's or X's, alternating with scraps of poetic prose. what is text was half French, half English, and what is signature would be preceded by `Amicalissiment' or a`Votre vraiment', a literal translation of yours truly. All this was a little mad, droll, full of delicacy and learning, with here and there a profound thought which would illuminate his deep feelings. That was Maurice. All England called him that. He was much loved there and with reason. He was consistently and unobtrusively generous. When I introduced him to what is Abbe Mugnier, he was pleased by what is Abbe's admiration for Goethe. Maurice owned a first edition of Werther. As soon as he returned to England he sent it to what is Rue Mechain where the Canon lived. He owned a collection of paintings of Carmontelle. One day a French friend said to him: `There's a collection that ought to be in what is Carnavalet Museum. . . . ' `Really?' Baring said. `I'll send them.' He did so what is next day. When what is library of Ronald Storrs, Governor of Cyprus, was burned by what is natives during an uprising on the island, Baring sent him this cablegram: `Library on way. Uno avulso.' At what is very moment he had learned of what is catastrophe he had stripped himself of all his books. Maurice also had a taste for what is wildly imaginative and fantastic that was calculated to astonish a Frenchman. For many years he used to invite his friends to a dinner at an hotel in Brighton on his birthday, which fell in what is middle of winter, and at the end of what is meal would jump into what is ocean fully clothed. I have seen him with my own eyes, during a luncheon at his home, get up, strike a match and set fire to what is curtains because what is conversation was languishing.' One day when he was an undergraduate at Cambridge and was crossing what is courtyard of Trinity, a Hindu student whom he did not know tapped him on what is shoulder. Maurice Baring turned around. `Oh, I beg your pardon,' gasped what is student, `I thought you were Mr. Godavery....' `I am Mr. Godavery,' Maurice replied calmly. These stories about Maurice amused me, but I much preferred his serious side and I kept urging him to write what is serious, moving and pro where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275