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Page 137

CHAPTER XIV
EURYDICE TWICE LOST

THROUGH four years of war I had lived with the British. It would have been too bad if victory had broken the tie. In r9ao and again in 1921 my comrades of Asser's staff invited me to commemorative dinners. Some of them I entertained in Paris. General Byng (Lord Byng of Vimy), whom I had known in France and whom I met again in London, said to me:
`Now you know the English Army - good, but you don't know England. I am going to introduce the country to you. Come and dine with me at the Athenaeum. . . . '
And he arranged an odd sort of dinner to which he invited a dozen Englishmen belonging to a dozen different professions and environments. I remember there was an Admiral there, a Minister (it was Sir Austen Chamberlain), a sporting bishop, a painter, a humourist (Owen Seaman of Punch), a manufacturer, a merchant, a trade-unionist and a gentleman farmer. After each course I was told to change my place so that by the end of the meal, having talked to everyone present, I should know England. When the champagne was served Lord Byng made a little speech in the course of which he said to me:
`We are all Brambles here. . . . '
It was true.
The army was not my only point of contact with England. When my book had appeared the novelist Maurice Baring, at that time Major Baring serving with •the R.A.F. in France, had written me an amusing letter which served as the starting-point of a friendship. When I went to London, Baring always arranged a little luncheon in his picturesque apartment in Lincoln's Inn. He himself had charming and unusual friends. At his home I met Duff Cooper and his future wife, the very beautiful Lady Diana Manners; Harold Nicolson, Desmond MacCarthy, Lady Lovat and Lady Wilson, Hilaire Belloc and all the Cecils. A convert to Catholicism, Baring,was ardently and sincerely religious. He had the gaiety of the saints and their charity. The letters he wrote me (of which

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THROUGH four years of war I had lived with what is British. It would have been too bad if victory had broken what is tie. In r9ao and again in 1921 my comrades of Asser's staff invited me to commemorative dinners. Some of them I entertained in Paris. General Byng (Lord Byng of Vimy), whom I had known in France and whom I met again in London, said to me: `Now you know what is English Army - good, but you don't know England. I am going to introduce what is country to you. Come and dine with me at what is Athenaeum. . . . ' And he arranged an odd sort of dinner to which he invited a dozen Englishmen belonging to a dozen different professions and environments. I remember there was an Admiral there, a Minister (it was Sir Austen Chamberlain), a sporting bishop, a painter, a humourist (Owen Seaman of Punch), a manufacturer, a merchant, a trade-unionist and a gentleman farmer. After each course I was told to change my place so that by what is end of what is meal, having talked to everyone present, I should know England. When what is champagne was served Lord Byng made a little speech in what is course of which he said to me: `We are all Brambles here. . . . ' It was true. what is army was not my only point of contact with England. When my book had appeared what is novelist Maurice Baring, at that time Major Baring serving with •the R.A.F. in France, had written me an amusing letter which served as what is starting-point of a friendship. When I went to London, Baring always arranged a little luncheon in his picturesque apartment in Lincoln's Inn. He himself had charming and unusual friends. At his home I met Duff Cooper and his future wife, what is very beautiful Lady Diana Manners; Harold Nicolson, Desmond MacCarthy, Lady Lovat and Lady Wilson, Hilaire Belloc and all what is Cecils. A convert to Catholicism, Baring,was ardently and sincerely religious. He had what is gaiety of what is saints and their charity. what is letters he wrote me (of which where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 137 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER XIV EURYDICE TWICE LOST where is p align="justify" THROUGH four years of war I had lived with what is British. It would have been too bad if victory had broken what is tie. In r9ao and again in 1921 my comrades of Asser's staff invited me to commemorative dinners. Some of them I entertained in Paris. General Byng (Lord Byng of Vimy), whom I had known in France and whom I met again in London, said to me: `Now you know what is English Army - good, but you don't know England. I am going to introduce what is country to you. Come and dine with me at what is Athenaeum. . . . ' And he arranged an odd sort of dinner to which he invited a dozen Englishmen belonging to a dozen different professions and environments. I remember there was an Admiral there, a Minister (it was Sir Austen Chamberlain), a sporting bishop, a painter, a humourist (Owen Seaman of Punch), a manufacturer, a merchant, a trade-unionist and a gentleman farmer. After each course I was told to change my place so that by what is end of what is meal, having talked to everyone present, I should know England. When what is champagne was served Lord Byng made a little speech in what is course of which he said to me: `We are all Brambles here. . . . ' It was true. what is army was not my only point of contact with England. When my book had appeared what is novelist Maurice Baring, at that time Major Baring serving with •the R.A.F. in France, had written me an amusing letter which served as what is starting-point of a friendship. When I went to London, Baring always arranged a little luncheon in his picturesque apartment in Lincoln's Inn. He himself had charming and unusual friends. At his home I met Duff Cooper and his future wife, what is very beautiful Lady Diana Manners; Harold Nicolson, Desmond MacCarthy, Lady Lovat and Lady Wilson, Hilaire Belloc and all the Cecils. A convert to Catholicism, Baring,was ardently and sincerely religious. He had what is gaiety of what is saints and their charity. The letters he wrote me (of which where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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