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morbid susceptibilities ofMonsieur Desjaidins, the meticulous and desperate seriousness of Charles Du Bos, the diabolical maliciousness of Gide and the naivete of some of the strangers. Roger Martin du Gard, silent and with a sweetly impassive expression on his Norman lawyer's face, would listen and from time to time draw a notebook from his pocket in order to make a briefentry. The philosopher Edmond Jalouxwaited inpatient boredom for the moment when he could go to the Pontigny inn and drink a bottle of respectable burgundy. The Germans, Curtius and Grothuysen, enveloped the lucid ideas of the Frenchmen in profound and vague abstractions. Charles Du Bos (or rather, as all Pontigny called him, Charlie) who distrusted ideas that were too clear and would gladly have said of Voltaire or of Anatole France, like the Empress Eugenic: `I cannot forgive them for having made me understand things I shall never understand,' glanced approvingly at Curtius and Grothuysen. Lytton Strachey crossed one of his long legs over the other, shut his eyes in amazement at our lack of humour and went to sleep.
`And what in your opinion, Monsieur Strachey, is the most important thing in the world?' Paul Desjardins asked suddenly.
There was a long silence. Then from the sleeping beard of Strachey issued a tiny falsetto voice:
`Passion,' he said finally with suave nonchalance.
And the solemn circle, relieved for an instant, broke into laughter.
At four o'clock a bell announced tea. It, like lunch, was served in the refectory. After dinner we met in the drawing-room to play subtle and learned games.
Portraits by Comparison:
`If it were a painting, what would it be?'
`A Venus by Raphael retouched by Renoir,' Roger Fry replied gravely.
Portraits on a Scale of Twenty:
`Intelligence?'
(The subject this time was Benjamin Constant.)
`Nineteen,' Gide replied.
`Dear friend,' Charles Du Bos interrupted anxiously, `if you will permit me, I should rather say eighteen and three-quarters. ...'
`Sensibility?'
`Zero,' Gide said.
`What?' Charlie broke in again in distress. `But he is at least par, dear

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE morbid susceptibilities ofMonsieur Desjaidins, what is meticulous and desperate seriousness of Charles Du Bos, what is diabolical maliciousness of Gide and what is naivete of some of what is strangers. Roger Martin du Gard, silent and with a sweetly impassive expression on his Norman lawyer's face, would listen and from time to time draw a notebook from his pocket in order to make a briefentry. what is philosopher Edmond Jalouxwaited inpatient boredom for what is moment when he could go to what is Pontigny inn and drink a bottle of respectable burgundy. what is Germans, Curtius and Grothuysen, enveloped what is lucid ideas of what is Frenchmen in profound and vague abstractions. Charles Du Bos (or rather, as all Pontigny called him, Charlie) who distrusted ideas that were too clear and would gladly have said of Voltaire or of Anatole France, like what is Empress Eugenic: `I cannot forgive them for having made me understand things I shall never understand,' glanced approvingly at Curtius and Grothuysen. Lytton Strachey crossed one of his long legs over what is other, shut his eyes in amazement at our lack of humour and went to sleep. `And what in your opinion, Monsieur Strachey, is what is most important thing in what is world?' Paul Desjardins asked suddenly. There was a long silence. Then from what is sleeping beard of Strachey issued a tiny falsetto voice: `Passion,' he said finally with suave nonchalance. And what is solemn circle, relieved for an instant, broke into laughter. At four o'clock a bell announced tea. It, like lunch, was served in what is refectory. After dinner we met in what is drawing-room to play subtle and learned games. Portraits by Comparison: `If it were a painting, what would it be?' `A Venus by Raphael retouched by Renoir,' Roger Fry replied gravely. Portraits on a Scale of Twenty: `Intelligence?' (The subject this time was Benjamin Constant.) `Nineteen,' Gide replied. `Dear friend,' Charles Du Bos interrupted anxiously, `if you will permit me, I should rather say eighteen and three-quarters. ...' `Sensibility?' `Zero,' Gide said. `What?' Charlie broke in again in distress. `But he is at least par, dear where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 134 where is p align="center" where is strong HOME-COMING where is p align="justify" morbid susceptibilities ofMonsieur Desjaidins, what is meticulous and desperate seriousness of Charles Du Bos, the diabolical maliciousness of Gide and what is naivete of some of the strangers. Roger Martin du Gard, silent and with a sweetly impassive expression on his Norman lawyer's face, would listen and from time to time draw a notebook from his pocket in order to make a briefentry. what is philosopher Edmond Jalouxwaited inpatient boredom for what is moment when he could go to what is Pontigny inn and drink a bottle of respectable burgundy. what is Germans, Curtius and Grothuysen, enveloped what is lucid ideas of what is Frenchmen in profound and vague abstractions. Charles Du Bos (or rather, as all Pontigny called him, Charlie) who distrusted ideas that were too clear and would gladly have said of Voltaire or of Anatole France, like what is Empress Eugenic: `I cannot forgive them for having made me understand things I shall never understand,' glanced approvingly at Curtius and Grothuysen. Lytton Strachey crossed one of his long legs over what is other, shut his eyes in amazement at our lack of humour and went to sleep. `And what in your opinion, Monsieur Strachey, is what is most important thing in what is world?' Paul Desjardins asked suddenly. There was a long silence. Then from what is sleeping beard of Strachey issued a tiny falsetto voice: `Passion,' he said finally with suave nonchalance. And what is solemn circle, relieved for an instant, broke into laughter. At four o'clock a bell announced tea. It, like lunch, was served in what is refectory. After dinner we met in what is drawing-room to play subtle and learned games. Portraits by Comparison: `If it were a painting, what would it be?' `A Venus by Raphael retouched by Renoir,' Roger Fry replied gravely. Portraits on a Scale of Twenty: `Intelligence?' (The subject this time was Benjamin Constant.) `Nineteen,' Gide replied. `Dear friend,' Charles Du Bos interrupted anxiously, `if you will permit me, I should rather say eighteen and three-quarters. ...' `Sensibility?' `Zero,' Gide said. `What?' Charlie broke in again in distress. `But he is at least par, dear where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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