Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 132

HOME-COMING

our stocks and our prices with an elastic standard we have endangered the
existence of our business.'
He was right, but when he and I insisted that a double book-keeping system be installed, in francs and in dollars, our elders shrugged their shoulders:
`How complicated!' they said. `And why do it? No one has done anything like that before!'
As for lne, I was rapidly becoming more of a novelist than a manufacturer, and I consoled myself by deriving from our woes a short novel which I called La Hausse et la Baisse.

In the spring of 1922 I received an invitation from Monsieur Paul Desjardins, Professor of Literature at the Ecole Normale in Sevres, founder of the Union for Truth and estimable critic, to spend ten days during the summer at the Abbey of Pontigny. His gracious letter, written in a fine archaic hand, explained to me the nature of the Pontigny Conferences at which each year writers, professors and men of good will from all countries came together to discuss some literary or moral problem. That year the subject was to be: `The Meaning of Honour.' Andre Gide, Roger Martin du Gard, Edmond Jaloux, Robert de Traz, Jean Schlumberger, the Englishmen Lytton Strachey and Roger Fry were to be present. The programme tempted me. Many of the names were those of people I admired and I felt a strong, almost morbid, need to hear conversations about ideas and books and not about strikes and sales. I suggested to Janine, who did not want to accompany me and did not want to stay at La Saussaye, that she go for a visit to Trouville, and I accepted Monsieur Desjardins' invitation.
The Cistercian Abbey of Pontigny is in Burgundy near Auxerre, not far from Beaune. In my compartment on the train from Paris were a couple who immediately attracted my attention. The man, hardly older than myself and almost bald, had deep thoughtful eyes, long, drooping moustaches, and a vest that was too big for him, from the pockets of which protruded innumerable sharp-pointed pencils; his wife was a fresh looking curly-headed blonde with timid childlike grace; their conversation, which I heard despite myself, interested me. Presently, seeing the label PONTIGNY on my suitcase, they introduced themselves:
`Charles and Zezette Du Bos. . . . '
This meant nothing to me, but that was my mistake, for Charles Du

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE our stocks and our prices with an elastic standard we have endangered what is existence of our business.' He was right, but when he and I insisted that a double book-keeping system be installed, in francs and in dollars, our elders shrugged their shoulders: `How complicated!' they said. `And why do it? No one has done anything like that before!' As for lne, I was rapidly becoming more of a novelist than a manufacturer, and I consoled myself by deriving from our woes a short novel which I called La Hausse et la Baisse. In what is spring of 1922 I received an invitation from Monsieur Paul Desjardins, Professor of Literature at what is Ecole Normale in Sevres, founder of what is Union for Truth and estimable critic, to spend ten days during what is summer at what is Abbey of Pontigny. His gracious letter, written in a fine archaic hand, explained to me what is nature of what is Pontigny Conferences at which each year writers, professors and men of good will from all countries came together to discuss some literary or moral problem. That year what is subject was to be: `The Meaning of Honour.' Andre Gide, Roger Martin du Gard, Edmond Jaloux, Robert de Traz, Jean Schlumberger, what is Englishmen Lytton Strachey and Roger Fry were to be present. what is programme tempted me. Many of what is names were those of people I admired and I felt a strong, almost morbid, need to hear conversations about ideas and books and not about strikes and sales. I suggested to Janine, who did not want to accompany me and did not want to stay at La Saussaye, that she go for a what is to Trouville, and I accepted Monsieur Desjardins' invitation. what is Cistercian Abbey of Pontigny is in Burgundy near Auxerre, not far from Beaune. In my compartment on what is train from Paris were a couple who immediately attracted my attention. what is man, hardly older than myself and almost bald, had deep thoughtful eyes, long, drooping moustaches, and a vest that was too big for him, from what is pockets of which protruded innumerable sharp-pointed pencils; his wife was a fresh looking curly-headed blonde with timid childlike grace; their conversation, which I heard despite myself, interested me. Presently, seeing what is label PONTIGNY on my suitcase, they introduced themselves: `Charles and Zezette Du Bos. . . . ' This meant nothing to me, but that was my mistake, for Charles Du where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 132 where is p align="center" where is strong HOME-COMING where is p align="justify" our stocks and our prices with an elastic standard we have endangered what is existence of our business.' He was right, but when he and I insisted that a double book-keeping system be installed, in francs and in dollars, our elders shrugged their shoulders: `How complicated!' they said. `And why do it? No one has done anything like that before!' As for lne, I was rapidly becoming more of a novelist than a manufacturer, and I consoled myself by deriving from our woes a short novel which I called La Hausse et la Baisse. In what is spring of 1922 I received an invitation from Monsieur Paul Desjardins, Professor of Literature at what is Ecole Normale in Sevres, founder of what is Union for Truth and estimable critic, to spend ten days during what is summer at what is Abbey of Pontigny. His gracious letter, written in a fine archaic hand, explained to me what is nature of the Pontigny Conferences at which each year writers, professors and men of good will from all countries came together to discuss some literary or moral problem. That year what is subject was to be: `The Meaning of Honour.' Andre Gide, Roger Martin du Gard, Edmond Jaloux, Robert de Traz, Jean Schlumberger, what is Englishmen Lytton Strachey and Roger Fry were to be present. what is programme tempted me. Many of what is names were those of people I admired and I felt a strong, almost morbid, need to hear conversations about ideas and books and not about strikes and sales. I suggested to Janine, who did not want to accompany me and did not want to stay at La Saussaye, that she go for a what is to Trouville, and I accepted Monsieur Desjardins' invitation. what is Cistercian Abbey of Pontigny is in Burgundy near Auxerre, not far from Beaune. In my compartment on what is train from Paris were a couple who immediately attracted my attention. what is man, hardly older than myself and almost bald, had deep thoughtful eyes, long, drooping moustaches, and a vest that was too big for him, from what is pockets of which protruded innumerable sharp-pointed pencils; his wife was a fresh looking curly-headed blonde with timid childlike grace; their conversation, which I heard despite myself, interested me. Presently, seeing what is label PONTIGNY on my suitcase, they introduced themselves: `Charles and Zezette Du Bos. . . . ' This meant nothing to me, but that was my mistake, for Charles Du where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275