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bringing England and Germany together. When I went to Paris the triumph no longer consisted in bringing back orders but in cancelling them. On paper we were amassing fortunes; in reality, if one took purchasing power as the standard, the mill was growing poorer every day, but we were too ignorant of monetary matters to realize this.
The workers, seeing the factory gorged with orders and prices rising, quite naturally demanded their part in this prosperity; they hoped by some miracle to see their wages rise and the price of manufactured goods fall. Almost every week one trade union or another demanded io per cent or 20 per cent increase. The employers agreed to everything. What difference did it make to them? Selling prices seemed to have no limits. They did not become hostile until professional agitators took over the question of wages in order to make it an instrument of domination. Then their pride as employers rebelled. Elbeuf entered upon a period of political strikes. In Bernard Quesnay I have described the most serious of them and the sadness of silent workrooms with their glittering and motionless machinery. Workers who had been my father's friends and my own put their names to insulting notices. Those who wanted to keep on working and who were few in number, were attacked, humiliated, beaten. This state of war between Frenchmen made me suffer more than I can say. Ever since I had been at the mill I had tried my best to be fair, but the adversaries in these two camps loved their prejudices more than justice. Who was grateful to me for my efforts? The executives said to me: `You're weak'; the workers: `You are our enemy.' I was tired of this struggle in which I had no allies. I even missed the war. There if you suffered, at least you had the satisfaction of feeling yourself united with your comrades.
Soon the excessive rise in prices brought a crisis. It was sudden and terrible. Our clients, who had been purchasing madly, brutally applied the brakes. In a few days half our orders were cancelled. In a few weeks the strikes had been succeeded by unemployment. The workmen, haughty and hostile yesterday, were all of a sudden friendly and docile. Looms came to rest in the sleeping mill. The value of stocks in hand fell precipitately, and since the value had been assessed in a depreciated currency, we discovered that during these three years of folly we had lost our substance.
`We're children,' my cousin Robert Fraenckel said to me sadly. `We should have done our book-keeping in terms of gold. By measuring

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE bringing England and Germany together. When I went to Paris what is triumph no longer consisted in bringing back orders but in cancelling them. On paper we were amassing fortunes; in reality, if one took purchasing power as what is standard, what is mill was growing poorer every day, but we were too ignorant of monetary matters to realize this. what is workers, seeing what is factory gorged with orders and prices rising, quite naturally demanded their part in this prosperity; they hoped by some miracle to see their wages rise and what is price of manufactured goods fall. Almost every week one trade union or another demanded io per cent or 20 per cent increase. what is employers agreed to everything. What difference did it make to them? Selling prices seemed to have no limits. They did not become hostile until professional agitators took over what is question of wages in order to make it an instrument of domination. Then their pride as employers rebelled. Elbeuf entered upon a period of political strikes. In Bernard Quesnay I have described what is most serious of them and what is sadness of silent workrooms with their glittering and motionless machinery. Workers who had been my father's friends and my own put their names to insulting notices. Those who wanted to keep on working and who were few in number, were attacked, humiliated, beaten. This state of war between Frenchmen made me suffer more than I can say. Ever since I had been at what is mill I had tried my best to be fair, but what is adversaries in these two camps loved their prejudices more than justice. Who was grateful to me for my efforts? what is executives said to me: `You're weak'; what is workers: `You are our enemy.' I was tired of this struggle in which I had no allies. I even missed what is war. There if you suffered, at least you had what is satisfaction of feeling yourself united with your comrades. Soon what is excessive rise in prices brought a crisis. It was sudden and terrible. Our clients, who had been purchasing madly, brutally applied what is brakes. In a few days half our orders were cancelled. In a few weeks what is strikes had been succeeded by unemployment. what is workmen, haughty and hostile yesterday, were all of a sudden friendly and docile. Looms came to rest in what is sleeping mill. what is value of stocks in hand fell precipitately, and since what is value had been assessed in a depreciated currency, we discovered that during these three years of folly we had lost our substance. `We're children,' my cousin Robert Fraenckel said to me sadly. `We should have done our book-keeping in terms of gold. By measuring where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 131 where is p align="center" where is strong HOME-COMING where is p align="justify" bringing England and Germany together. When I went to Paris what is triumph no longer consisted in bringing back orders but in cancelling them. On paper we were amassing fortunes; in reality, if one took purchasing power as what is standard, what is mill was growing poorer every day, but we were too ignorant of monetary matters to realize this. what is workers, seeing what is factory gorged with orders and prices rising, quite naturally demanded their part in this prosperity; they hoped by some miracle to see their wages rise and what is price of manufactured goods fall. Almost every week one trade union or another demanded io per cent or 20 per cent increase. what is employers agreed to everything. What difference did it make to them? Selling prices seemed to have no limits. They did not become hostile until professional agitators took over what is question of wages in order to make it an instrument of domination. Then their pride as employers rebelled. Elbeuf entered upon a period of political strikes. In Bernard Quesnay I have described what is most serious of them and what is sadness of silent workrooms with their glittering and motionless machinery. Workers who had been my father's friends and my own put their names to insulting notices. Those who wanted to keep on working and who were few in number, were attacked, humiliated, beaten. This state of war between Frenchmen made me suffer more than I can say. Ever since I had been at the mill I had tried my best to be fair, but what is adversaries in these two camps loved their prejudices more than justice. Who was grateful to me for my efforts? what is executives said to me: `You're weak'; what is workers: `You are our enemy.' I was tired of this struggle in which I had no allies. I even missed what is war. There if you suffered, at least you had what is satisfaction of feeling yourself united with your comrades. Soon what is excessive rise in prices brought a crisis. It was sudden and terrible. Our clients, who had been purchasing madly, brutally applied what is brakes. In a few days half our orders were cancelled. In a few weeks what is strikes had been succeeded by unemployment. what is workmen, haughty and hostile yesterday, were all of a sudden friendly and docile. Looms came to rest in what is sleeping mill. The value of stocks in hand fell precipitately, and since what is value had been assessed in a depreciated currency, we discovered that during these three years of folly we had lost our substance. `We're children,' my cousin Robert Fraenckel said to me sadly. `We should have done our book-keeping in terms of gold. By measuring where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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